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\n  \n 2016\n \n \n (50)\n \n \n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Effect of ions on sulfuric acid-water binary particle formation: 1. Theory for kinetic- and nucleation-type particle formation and atmospheric implications.\n \n\n\n \n Merikanto, J.; Duplissy, J.; Määttänen, A.; Henschel, H.; Donahue, N., M.; Brus, D.; Schobesberger, S.; Kulmala, M.; and Vehkamäki, H.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 121(4): 1736-1751. 2 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"EffectWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Effect of ions on sulfuric acid-water binary particle formation: 1. Theory for kinetic- and nucleation-type particle formation and atmospheric implications},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {1736-1751},\n volume = {121},\n websites = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2015JD023538,http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JD023538},\n month = {2},\n day = {27},\n id = {c99e27ff-5b4a-3329-b680-d10aa5d98ef8},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:21.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Merikanto:jgra:2015a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Merikanto, Joonas and Duplissy, Jonathan and Määttänen, Anni and Henschel, Henning and Donahue, Neil M and Brus, David and Schobesberger, Siegfried and Kulmala, Markku and Vehkamäki, Hanna},\n journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres},\n number = {4}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Urban particulate matter pollution: a tale of five cities.\n \n\n\n \n Pandis, S., N.; Skyllakou, K.; Florou, K.; Kostenidou, E.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Hasa, E.; and Presto, A., A.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n FARADAY DISCUSSIONS, 189: 277-290. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Urban particulate matter pollution: a tale of five cities},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {277-290},\n volume = {189},\n id = {5c4b34fb-4ba3-3809-9ed0-56e94cbc4809},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:21.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000380099700014},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {Five case studies (Athens and Paris in Europe, Pittsburgh and Los\nAngeles in the United States, and Mexico City in Central America) are\nused to gain insights into the changing levels, sources, and role of\natmospheric chemical processes in air quality in large urban areas as\nthey develop technologically. Fine particulate matter is the focus of\nour analysis. In all cases reductions of emissions by industrial and\ntransportation sources have resulted in significant improvements in air\nquality during the last few decades. However, these changes have\nresulted in the increasing importance of secondary particulate matter\n(PM) which dominates over primary in most cases. At the same time, long\nrange transport of secondary PM from sources located hundreds of\nkilometres from the cities is becoming a bigger contributor to the urban\nPM levels in all seasons. ``Non-traditional'' sources including\ncooking, and residential and agricultural biomass burning contribute an\nincreasing fraction of the now reduced fine PM levels. Atmospheric\nchemistry is found to change the chemical signatures of a number of\nthese sources relatively fast both during the day and night,\ncomplicating the corresponding source apportionment.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Pandis, Spyros N and Skyllakou, Ksakousti and Florou, Kalliopi and Kostenidou, Evangelia and Kaltsonoudis, Christos and Hasa, Erion and Presto, Albert A},\n journal = {FARADAY DISCUSSIONS}\n}
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\n Five case studies (Athens and Paris in Europe, Pittsburgh and Los\nAngeles in the United States, and Mexico City in Central America) are\nused to gain insights into the changing levels, sources, and role of\natmospheric chemical processes in air quality in large urban areas as\nthey develop technologically. Fine particulate matter is the focus of\nour analysis. In all cases reductions of emissions by industrial and\ntransportation sources have resulted in significant improvements in air\nquality during the last few decades. However, these changes have\nresulted in the increasing importance of secondary particulate matter\n(PM) which dominates over primary in most cases. At the same time, long\nrange transport of secondary PM from sources located hundreds of\nkilometres from the cities is becoming a bigger contributor to the urban\nPM levels in all seasons. ``Non-traditional'' sources including\ncooking, and residential and agricultural biomass burning contribute an\nincreasing fraction of the now reduced fine PM levels. Atmospheric\nchemistry is found to change the chemical signatures of a number of\nthese sources relatively fast both during the day and night,\ncomplicating the corresponding source apportionment.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Hidden sulphuric acid leads to rapid growth of freshly nucleated nano-particles under atmospheric conditions.\n \n\n\n \n Lehtipalo, K.; Rondo, L.; Schobesberger, S.; Jokinen, T.; Sarnela, N.; Franchin, A.; Nieminen, T.; Sipilä, M.; Kürten, A.; Riccobono, F.; Erhart, S.; Yli-Juuti, T.; Konkanen, J.; Adamov, A.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Dommen, J.; Downard, A., J.; Dunne, E., M.; Duplissy, J.; Flagan, R., C.; Guida, R.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Jud, W.; Kangasluoma, J.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; and Serge Mathot; Ortega, I., K.; Onnela, A.; Praplan, A.; and Matti P. Rissanen; Ruuskanen, T.; Santos, F., D.; Schallhart, S.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Smith, J., N.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Tomé, A.; Vaattovaara, P.; Vrtala, A., E.; E.Wagner, P.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Winkler, P., M.; Virtanen, A.; Donahue, N., M.; Carslaw, K., S.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Riipinen, I.; Curtius, J.; Kulmala, M.; and Worsnop, D., R.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Nature Communications, 7: 11594. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"HiddenWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Hidden sulphuric acid leads to rapid growth of freshly nucleated nano-particles under atmospheric conditions},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {11594},\n volume = {7},\n websites = {http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms11594/},\n id = {44c8baf6-8426-32e8-9fc4-882a68e7ca35},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:21.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Lehtipalo:naturecom:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Lehtipalo, Katrianne and Rondo, Linda and Schobesberger, Siegfried and Jokinen, Tuija and Sarnela, Nina and Franchin, Alessandro and Nieminen, Tuomo and Sipilä, Mikko and Kürten, Andreas and Riccobono, Francesco and Erhart, Sebastian and Yli-Juuti, Taina and Konkanen, Jenni and Adamov, Alexey and Almeida, João and Amorim, Antonio and Bianchi, Federico and Breitenlechner, Martin and Dommen, Josef and Downard, Andrew J and Dunne, Eimear M and Duplissy, Jonathan and Flagan, Richard C and Guida, Roberto and Hakala, Jani and Hansel, Armin and Jud, Werner and Kangasluoma, Juha and Keskinen, Helmi and Kim, Jaseok and Kupc, Agnieszka and Laaksonen, Ari and and Serge Mathot, undefined and Ortega, Ismael K and Onnela, Antti and Praplan, Arnaud and and Matti P. Rissanen, undefined and Ruuskanen, Taina and Santos, Filipe D and Schallhart, Simon and Schnitzhofer, Ralf and Smith, James N and Tröstl, Jasmin and Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios and Tomé, António and Vaattovaara, Petri and Vrtala, Aron E and E.Wagner, Paul and Williamson, Christina and Wimmer, Daniela and Winkler, Paul M and Virtanen, Annele and Donahue, Neil M and Carslaw, Kenneth S and Baltensperger, Urs and Kirkby, Jasper and Riipinen, Ilona and Curtius, Joachim and Kulmala, Markku and Worsnop, Douglas R},\n journal = {Nature Communications}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Can highly oxidized organics contribute to atmospheric new-particle formation?.\n \n\n\n \n Ortega, I., K.; Donahue, N., M.; Kurtén, T.; Kulmala, M.; Focsa, C.; and Vehkamäki, H.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Journal of Physical Chemistry A, 120: 1452-1458. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"CanWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Can highly oxidized organics contribute to atmospheric new-particle formation?},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {1452-1458},\n volume = {120},\n websites = {http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.jpca.5b07427},\n id = {27c90ff6-20c1-30db-9830-076be1d9295a},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:21.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Ortega:jpca:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Ortega, I K and Donahue, N M and Kurtén, T and Kulmala, M and Focsa, C and Vehkamäki, H},\n journal = {Journal of Physical Chemistry A}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Pressure Dependent Criegee Intermediate Stabilization from Alkene Ozonolysis.\n \n\n\n \n Hakala, J.; and Donahue, N., M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Journal of Physical Chemistry A, 120: 2173-2178. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"PressureWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Pressure Dependent Criegee Intermediate Stabilization from Alkene Ozonolysis},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {2173-2178},\n volume = {120},\n websites = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpca.6b01538},\n id = {f8dc4119-8732-36ef-9619-14ce4d1cb0c8},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:21.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Hakala:jpca:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Hakala, J and Donahue, N M},\n journal = {Journal of Physical Chemistry A}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Intermediate Volatility Organic Compound Emissions from On-Road Gasoline Vehicles and Small Off-Road Gasoline Engines.\n \n\n\n \n Zhao, Y., L.; Nguyen, N., T.; Presto, A., A.; Hennigan, C., J.; May, A., A.; and Robinson, A., L.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Environmental Science & Technology, 50(8): 4554-4563. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"IntermediateWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Intermediate Volatility Organic Compound Emissions from On-Road Gasoline Vehicles and Small Off-Road Gasoline Engines},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {4554-4563},\n volume = {50},\n websites = {%3CGo,to},\n id = {7aeb0048-d49d-3852-b307-4203df6052a1},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:21.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {RN1184},\n source_type = {article},\n user_context = {Journal Article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Zhao, Y L and Nguyen, N T and Presto, A A and Hennigan, C J and May, A A and Robinson, A L},\n journal = {Environmental Science & Technology},\n number = {8}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n A 2-Dimensional Volatility Basis Set -- Part 3: Prognostic modeling and NO$_x$ dependence.\n \n\n\n \n Chuang, W.; and Donahue, N., M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 16: 123-134. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"AWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {A 2-Dimensional Volatility Basis Set -- Part 3: Prognostic modeling and NO$_x$ dependence},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {123-134},\n volume = {16},\n websites = {http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/16/123/2016/},\n id = {f7847505-f649-32a8-8802-a2cf5192c431},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:22.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Chuang:acp:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Chuang, W and Donahue, N M},\n journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Chemical complexity of the urban atmosphere and its consequences: general discussion.\n \n\n\n \n Geiger, F.; Pope, F.; MacKenzie, R.; Brune, W.; Monks, P., S.; Bloss, W.; Fuller, G.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Hort, M.; Tomlin, A.; Presto, A.; van Pinxteren, D.; Vlachou, A.; Heard, D.; Hewitt, C., N.; Baltensperger, U.; Lewis, A.; Querol, X.; Kim, S.; Hamilton, J.; Sommariva, R.; McFiggans, G.; Harrison, R.; Jimenez, J., L.; Cross, E.; Wenger, J.; Pandis, S.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Donahue, N., M.; Whalley, L.; McDonald, B.; Pieber, S.; Prevot, A.; Alam, M., S.; Kumar, N., K.; Wahner, A.; Skouloudis, A.; Kalberer, M.; Wallington, T.; and Dunmore, R.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n FARADAY DISCUSSIONS, 189: 137-167. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Chemical complexity of the urban atmosphere and its consequences: general discussion},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {137-167},\n volume = {189},\n id = {d7058af3-2d5e-3956-b3ae-85a463113d82},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:22.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000380099700008},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Geiger, Franz and Pope, Francis and MacKenzie, Rob and Brune, William and Monks, Paul S and Bloss, William and Fuller, Gary and Moussiopoulos, Nicolas and Hort, Matthew and Tomlin, Alison and Presto, Albert and van Pinxteren, Dominik and Vlachou, Athanasia and Heard, Dwayne and Hewitt, C N and Baltensperger, Urs and Lewis, Alastair and Querol, Xavier and Kim, Saewung and Hamilton, Jacqueline and Sommariva, Roberto and McFiggans, Gordon and Harrison, Roy and Jimenez, Jose L and Cross, Eben and Wenger, John and Pandis, Spyros and Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid and Donahue, Neil M and Whalley, Lisa and McDonald, Brian and Pieber, Simone and Prevot, Andre and Alam, Mohammed Salim and Kumar, Nivedita Krishna and Wahner, Andreas and Skouloudis, Andreas and Kalberer, Markus and Wallington, Timothy and Dunmore, Rachel},\n journal = {FARADAY DISCUSSIONS}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles.\n \n\n\n \n Kirkby, J.; Duplissy, J.; Sengupta, K.; Frege, C.; Gordon, H.; Williamson, C.; Heinritzi, M.; Simon, M.; Yan, C.; Almeida, J.; Tröstl, J.; Nieminen, T.; Ortega, I., K.; Wagner, R.; Adamov, A.; Amorim, A.; Bernhammer, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Brilke, S.; Chen, X.; Craven, J.; Dias, A.; Ehrhart, S.; Flagan, R., C.; Franchin, A.; Fuchs, C.; Guida, R.; Hakala, J.; Hoyle, C., R.; Jokinen, T.; Junninen, H.; Kangasluoma, J.; Kim, J.; Krapf, M.; Kürten, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Makhmutov, V.; Mathot, S.; Molteni, U.; Onnela, A.; Peräkylä, O.; Piel, F.; Petäjä, T.; Praplan, A., P.; Pringle, K.; Rap, A.; Richards, N., A., D.; Riipinen, I.; Rissanen, M., P.; Rondo, L.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Scott, C., E.; Seinfeld, J., H.; Sipilä, M.; Steiner, G.; Stozhkov, Y.; Stratmann, F.; Tomé, A.; Virtanen, A.; Vogel, A., L.; Wagner, A., C.; Wagner, P., E.; Weingartner, E.; Wimmer, D.; Winkler, P., M.; Ye, P.; Zhang, X.; Hansel, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N., M.; Worsnop, D., R.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Carslaw, K., S.; and Curtius, J.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Nature, 533(7604): 521-526. 5 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"Ion-inducedWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {521-526},\n volume = {533},\n websites = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature17953,http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature17953},\n month = {5},\n day = {25},\n id = {26985dd5-5d87-37b0-b973-d43ea5862e17},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:22.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Kirkby:nature:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Kirkby, Jasper and Duplissy, Jonathan and Sengupta, Kamalika and Frege, Carla and Gordon, Hamish and Williamson, Christina and Heinritzi, Martin and Simon, Mario and Yan, Chao and Almeida, João and Tröstl, Jasmin and Nieminen, Tuomo and Ortega, Ismael K and Wagner, Robert and Adamov, Alexey and Amorim, Antonio and Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin and Bianchi, Federico and Breitenlechner, Martin and Brilke, Sophia and Chen, Xuemeng and Craven, Jill and Dias, Antonio and Ehrhart, Sebastian and Flagan, Richard C and Franchin, Alessandro and Fuchs, Claudia and Guida, Roberto and Hakala, Jani and Hoyle, Christopher R and Jokinen, Tuija and Junninen, Heikki and Kangasluoma, Juha and Kim, Jaeseok and Krapf, Manuel and Kürten, Andreas and Laaksonen, Ari and Lehtipalo, Katrianne and Makhmutov, Vladimir and Mathot, Serge and Molteni, Ugo and Onnela, Antti and Peräkylä, Otso and Piel, Felix and Petäjä, Tuukka and Praplan, Arnaud P and Pringle, Kirsty and Rap, Alexandru and Richards, Nigel A D and Riipinen, Ilona and Rissanen, Matti P and Rondo, Linda and Sarnela, Nina and Schobesberger, Siegfried and Scott, Catherine E and Seinfeld, John H and Sipilä, Mikko and Steiner, Gerhard and Stozhkov, Yuri and Stratmann, Frank and Tomé, Antonio and Virtanen, Annele and Vogel, Alexander L and Wagner, Andrea C. and Wagner, Paul E and Weingartner, Ernest and Wimmer, Daniela and Winkler, Paul M and Ye, Penglin and Zhang, Xuan and Hansel, Armin and Dommen, Josef and Donahue, Neil M and Worsnop, Douglas R and Baltensperger, Urs and Kulmala, Markku and Carslaw, Kenneth S and Curtius, Joachim},\n journal = {Nature},\n number = {7604}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Numerical modelling strategies for the urban atmosphere: general discussion.\n \n\n\n \n MacKenzie, R.; Tomlin, A.; Kleffmann, J.; Karl, T.; Hewitt, C., N.; Heard, D.; Sartelet, K.; Sommariva, R.; Baltensperger, U.; Harrison, R.; Madronich, S.; McFiggans, G.; Pandis, S.; Wenger, J.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Donahue, N., M.; Dunmore, R.; Doherty, R.; Moller, S.; Kilbane-Dawe, I.; McDonald, B.; Wahner, A.; Zhu, S.; Presto, A.; Kalberer, M.; Hort, M.; Lee, J.; Nikolova, I.; Jimenez, J., L.; Whalley, L.; Alam, M., S.; and Skouloudis, A.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n FARADAY DISCUSSIONS, 189: 635-660. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Numerical modelling strategies for the urban atmosphere: general discussion},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {635-660},\n volume = {189},\n id = {3bb8be83-f16b-38e0-929c-5491a1d20a20},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:22.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000380099700030},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {MacKenzie, Rob and Tomlin, Alison and Kleffmann, Joerg and Karl, Thomas and Hewitt, C N and Heard, Dwayne and Sartelet, Karine and Sommariva, Roberto and Baltensperger, Urs and Harrison, Roy and Madronich, Sasha and McFiggans, Gordon and Pandis, Spyros and Wenger, John and Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid and Donahue, Neil M and Dunmore, Rachel and Doherty, Ruth and Moller, Sarah and Kilbane-Dawe, Iarla and McDonald, Brian and Wahner, Andreas and Zhu, Shupeng and Presto, Albert and Kalberer, Markus and Hort, Matthew and Lee, James and Nikolova, Irina and Jimenez, Jose L and Whalley, Lisa and Alam, Mohammed Salim and Skouloudis, Andreas},\n journal = {FARADAY DISCUSSIONS}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous secondary organic aerosol produced from ozonolysis of α-pinene.\n \n\n\n \n Ignatius, K.; Kristensen, T., B.; Järvinen, E.; Nichman, L.; Fuchs, C.; Gordon, H.; Herenz, P.; Hoyle, C., R.; Duplissy, J.; Garimella, S.; Dias, A.; Frege, C.; Höppel, N.; Tröstl, J.; Wagner, R.; Yan, C.; Amorim, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N., M.; Gallagher, M., W.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Tomé, A.; Virtanen, A.; Worsnop, D.; and Stratmann, F.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 16(10): 6495-6509. 5 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"HeterogeneousWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous secondary organic aerosol produced from ozonolysis of <i>α</i>-pinene},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {6495-6509},\n volume = {16},\n websites = {http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/16/6495/2016/},\n month = {5},\n publisher = {Copernicus GmbH},\n day = {27},\n id = {792985ca-4cd0-38a3-8cc9-048816384d83},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:22.000Z},\n accessed = {2016-05-27},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Ignatius2016},\n language = {English},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Ignatius, Karoliina and Kristensen, Thomas B. and Järvinen, Emma and Nichman, Leonid and Fuchs, Claudia and Gordon, Hamish and Herenz, Paul and Hoyle, Christopher R. and Duplissy, Jonathan and Garimella, Sarvesh and Dias, Antonio and Frege, Carla and Höppel, Niko and Tröstl, Jasmin and Wagner, Robert and Yan, Chao and Amorim, Antonio and Baltensperger, Urs and Curtius, Joachim and Donahue, Neil M. and Gallagher, Martin W. and Kirkby, Jasper and Kulmala, Markku and Möhler, Ottmar and Saathoff, Harald and Schnaiter, Martin and Tomé, Antonio and Virtanen, Annele and Worsnop, Douglas and Stratmann, Frank},\n journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics},\n number = {10}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n BTEX exposures in an area impacted by industrial and mobile sources: Source attribution and impact of averaging time.\n \n\n\n \n Presto, A., A.; Dallmann, T., R.; Gu, P., S.; and Rao, U.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association, 66(4): 387-401. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"BTEXWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {BTEX exposures in an area impacted by industrial and mobile sources: Source attribution and impact of averaging time},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {387-401},\n volume = {66},\n websites = {%3CGo,to},\n id = {e2e7fde0-339a-3138-b7be-0c9d29ec7241},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:22.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {RN1185},\n source_type = {article},\n user_context = {Journal Article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Presto, A A and Dallmann, T R and Gu, P S and Rao, U},\n journal = {Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association},\n number = {4}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Experimental particle formation rates spanning tropospheric conditions of sulfuric acid, ammonia, ions, and temperature.\n \n\n\n \n Kürten, A.; Bianchi, F.; Almeida, J.; Kupiainen-Maata; Dunne, E., M.; Duplissy, J.; Barmet, P.; Breitenlichner, M.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N., M.; Flagan, R., C.; Franchin, A.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Heinritzi, M.; Ickes, L.; Jokinen, T.; Kangasluoma, J.; Kim, J.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Makhmutov, V.; Onnela, A.; Ortega, I., K.; Petäjä, T.; Praplan, A., P.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M.; Rondo, L.; Schnizhofer, R.; Schobesberger, S.; Smith, J., N.; Steiner, G.; Stozhkov, Y.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Wagner, P., E.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Ye, P.; Baltensperger, U.; Carslaw, K.; Kulmala, M.; and Curtius, J.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres, in press. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Experimental particle formation rates spanning tropospheric conditions of sulfuric acid, ammonia, ions, and temperature},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n volume = {in press},\n id = {b9fa88c0-998d-37f3-b430-da7fe073b562},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:22.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Kuerten:jgra:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Kürten, A and Bianchi, F and Almeida, J and Kupiainen-Maata, undefined and Dunne, E M and Duplissy, J and Barmet, P and Breitenlichner, M and Dommen, J and Donahue, N M and Flagan, R C and Franchin, A and Hakala, J and Hansel, A and Heinritzi, M and Ickes, L and Jokinen, T and Kangasluoma, J and Kim, J and Kirkby, J and Kupc, A and Lehtipalo, K and Leiminger, M and Makhmutov, V and Onnela, A and Ortega, I K and Petäjä, T and Praplan, A P and Riccobono, F and Rissanen, M and Rondo, L and Schnizhofer, R and Schobesberger, S and Smith, J N and Steiner, G and Stozhkov, Y and Tomé, A and Tröstl, J and Tsagkogeorgas, G and Wagner, P E and Williamson, C and Wimmer, D and Ye, P and Baltensperger, U and Carslaw, K and Kulmala, M and Curtius, J},\n journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Vapor wall loss of semi-volatile organic compounds in a Teflon chamber.\n \n\n\n \n Ye, P.; Ding, X.; Hakala, J.; Hofbauer, V.; Robinson, E., S.; and Donahue, N., M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Aerosol Science and Technology, 50: 822-834. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"VaporWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Vapor wall loss of semi-volatile organic compounds in a Teflon chamber},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {822-834},\n volume = {50},\n websites = {http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02786826.2016.1195905},\n id = {8bf59e55-492d-3db1-9dc3-512d84266bf4},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {PYe:ast:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Ye, Penglin and Ding, Xiang and Hakala, Jani and Hofbauer, V and Robinson, E S and Donahue, N M},\n journal = {Aerosol Science and Technology}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Walls and organic condensation in smog chamber experiments.\n \n\n\n \n Trump, E., R.; Epstein, S., A.; Riipinen, I.; and Donahue, N., M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Aerosol Measurement Techniques, in press. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Walls and organic condensation in smog chamber experiments},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n volume = {in press},\n id = {b62e388c-ec95-3ff1-8c12-b6251d19b68a},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Trump:ast:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Trump, E R and Epstein, S A and Riipinen, I and Donahue, N M},\n journal = {Aerosol Measurement Techniques}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Public Health Costs of Primary PM2.5 and Inorganic PM2.5 Precursor Emissions in the United States.\n \n\n\n \n Heo, J.; Adams, P., J.; and Gao, H., O.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Environmental Science & Technology, 50(11): 6061-6070. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Public Health Costs of Primary PM2.5 and Inorganic PM2.5 Precursor Emissions in the United States},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {6061-6070},\n volume = {50},\n id = {1704f7bf-b866-3c1b-a6ae-b448084aaabc},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Heo2016a},\n source_type = {Journal Article},\n notes = {Times Cited: 0<br/>Heo, Jinhyok Adams, Peter J. Gao, H. Oliver},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Heo, J and Adams, P J and Gao, H O},\n journal = {Environmental Science & Technology},\n number = {11}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Effect of particle surface area on ice active site densities retrieved from droplet freezing spectra.\n \n\n\n \n Beydoun, H.; Polen, M.; and Sullivan, R., C.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 16(20): 13359-13378. 10 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"EffectWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Effect of particle surface area on ice active site densities retrieved from droplet freezing spectra},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {13359-13378},\n volume = {16},\n websites = {http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/16/13359/2016/},\n month = {10},\n day = {28},\n id = {3a85fcf0-14ca-3364-9f36-1dc7cecc2836},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {true},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Beydoun2016a},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {Heterogeneous ice nucleation remains one of the outstanding problems in cloud physics and atmospheric science. Experimental challenges in properly simulating particle-induced freezing processes under atmospherically relevant conditions have largely contributed to the absence of a well-established parameterization of immersion freezing properties. Here, we formulate an ice active, surface-site-based stochastic model of heterogeneous freezing with the unique feature of invoking a continuum assumption on the ice nucleating activity (contact angle) of an aerosol particle's surface that requires no assumptions about the size or number of active sites. The result is a particle-specific property g that defines a distribution of local ice nucleation rates. Upon integration, this yields a full freezing probability function for an ice nucleating particle. Current cold plate droplet freezing measurements provide a valuable and inexpensive resource for studying the freezing properties of many atmospheric aerosol systems. We apply our g framework to explain the observed dependence of the freezing temperature of droplets in a cold plate on the concentration of the particle species investigated. Normalizing to the total particle mass or surface area present to derive the commonly used ice nuclei active surface (INAS) density (ns) often cannot account for the effects of particle concentration, yet concentration is typically varied to span a wider measurable freezing temperature range. A method based on determining what is denoted an ice nucleating species' specific critical surface area is presented and explains the concentration dependence as a result of increasing the variability in ice nucleating active sites between droplets. By applying this method to experimental droplet freezing data from four different systems, we demonstrate its ability to interpret immersion freezing temperature spectra of droplets containing variable particle concentrations. It is shown that general active site density functions, such as the popular ns parameterization, cannot be reliably extrapolated below this critical surface area threshold to describe freezing curves for lower particle surface area concentrations. Freezing curves obtained below this threshold translate to higher ns values, while the ns values are essentially the same from curves obtained above the critical area threshold; ns should remain the same for a system as concentration is varied. However, we can successfully predict the lower concentration freezing curves, which are more atmospherically relevant, through a process of random sampling from g distributions obtained from high particle concentration data. Our analysis is applied to cold plate freezing measurements of droplets containing variable concentrations of particles from NX illite minerals, MCC cellulose, and commercial Snomax bacterial particles. Parameterizations that can predict the temporal evolution of the frozen fraction of cloud droplets in larger atmospheric models are also derived from this new framework.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Beydoun, Hassan and Polen, Michael and Sullivan, Ryan C.},\n journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics},\n number = {20}\n}
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\n Heterogeneous ice nucleation remains one of the outstanding problems in cloud physics and atmospheric science. Experimental challenges in properly simulating particle-induced freezing processes under atmospherically relevant conditions have largely contributed to the absence of a well-established parameterization of immersion freezing properties. Here, we formulate an ice active, surface-site-based stochastic model of heterogeneous freezing with the unique feature of invoking a continuum assumption on the ice nucleating activity (contact angle) of an aerosol particle's surface that requires no assumptions about the size or number of active sites. The result is a particle-specific property g that defines a distribution of local ice nucleation rates. Upon integration, this yields a full freezing probability function for an ice nucleating particle. Current cold plate droplet freezing measurements provide a valuable and inexpensive resource for studying the freezing properties of many atmospheric aerosol systems. We apply our g framework to explain the observed dependence of the freezing temperature of droplets in a cold plate on the concentration of the particle species investigated. Normalizing to the total particle mass or surface area present to derive the commonly used ice nuclei active surface (INAS) density (ns) often cannot account for the effects of particle concentration, yet concentration is typically varied to span a wider measurable freezing temperature range. A method based on determining what is denoted an ice nucleating species' specific critical surface area is presented and explains the concentration dependence as a result of increasing the variability in ice nucleating active sites between droplets. By applying this method to experimental droplet freezing data from four different systems, we demonstrate its ability to interpret immersion freezing temperature spectra of droplets containing variable particle concentrations. It is shown that general active site density functions, such as the popular ns parameterization, cannot be reliably extrapolated below this critical surface area threshold to describe freezing curves for lower particle surface area concentrations. Freezing curves obtained below this threshold translate to higher ns values, while the ns values are essentially the same from curves obtained above the critical area threshold; ns should remain the same for a system as concentration is varied. However, we can successfully predict the lower concentration freezing curves, which are more atmospherically relevant, through a process of random sampling from g distributions obtained from high particle concentration data. Our analysis is applied to cold plate freezing measurements of droplets containing variable concentrations of particles from NX illite minerals, MCC cellulose, and commercial Snomax bacterial particles. Parameterizations that can predict the temporal evolution of the frozen fraction of cloud droplets in larger atmospheric models are also derived from this new framework.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Secondary organic aerosols are crunchy when dry but runny when wet.\n \n\n\n \n Ye, Q.; Robinson, E., S.; Ye, P.; Ding, X.; Sullivan, R., C.; and Donahue, N., M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, in press. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Secondary organic aerosols are crunchy when dry but runny when wet},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n volume = {in press},\n id = {021f70f8-d71a-3881-aa0a-cd956ee0e0b0},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {QYe:pnas:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Ye, Qing and Robinson, E S and Ye, Penglin and Ding, Xiang and Sullivan, R C and Donahue, N M},\n journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Reduced-form modeling of public health impacts of inorganic PM2.5 and precursor emissions.\n \n\n\n \n Heo, J.; Adams, P., J.; and Gao, H., O.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Environment, 137: 80-89. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Reduced-form modeling of public health impacts of inorganic PM2.5 and precursor emissions},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {80-89},\n volume = {137},\n id = {1120fec7-597b-3dde-97b3-1dd65f591631},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Heo2016},\n source_type = {Journal Article},\n notes = {Times Cited: 1<br/>Heo, Jinhyok Adams, Peter J. Gao, H. Oliver},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Heo, J and Adams, P J and Gao, H O},\n journal = {Atmospheric Environment}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Single-particle measurements of phase partitioning between primary and secondary organic aerosols.\n \n\n\n \n Robinson, E., S.; Donahue, N., M.; Ye, Q.; Ahern, A., T.; and Lipsky, E., M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Faraday Discussions, 189: 31-49. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"Single-particleWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Single-particle measurements of phase partitioning between primary and secondary organic aerosols},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {31-49},\n volume = {189},\n websites = {http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2016/fd/c5fd00214a},\n id = {80d68113-fd7b-3a43-8fb8-eebae4d95ba8},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ERobinson:faraday:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Robinson, E S and Donahue, N M and Ye, Q and Ahern, A T and Lipsky, E M},\n journal = {Faraday Discussions}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Urban case studies: general discussion.\n \n\n\n \n Brune, W.; Bloss, W.; Shi, Z.; Pope, F.; Fuller, G.; Monks, P., S.; Tomlin, A.; Karl, T.; Hort, M.; Mohr, C.; MacKenzie, R.; Vlachou, A.; Tian, Z.; Kramer, L., J.; Heard, D.; Purvis, R.; Querol, X.; Baltensperger, U.; Dunmore, R.; Harrison, R.; Murrells, T.; Jimenez, J., L.; Cross, E.; McFiggans, G.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Ho, T.; Charron, A.; Wallington, T.; Krishna Kumar, N.; Pieber, S.; Geiger, F.; Wahner, A.; Mitchell, E.; Prévôt, A.; Skouloudis, A.; Kalberer, M.; McDonald, B.; Hewitt, C., N.; Sioutas, C.; Donahue, N., M.; Lee, J.; van Pinxteren, D.; Moller, S.; Minguillón, M., C.; Shafer, M.; Carslaw, D.; Ehlers, C.; and Pandis, S.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Faraday Discuss., 189: 473-514. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"UrbanWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Urban case studies: general discussion},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {473-514},\n volume = {189},\n websites = {http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C6FD90021F},\n id = {03eae47f-d7a6-30fc-a06f-9f86003d4442},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000380099700023},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Brune, William and Bloss, William and Shi, Zongbo and Pope, Francis and Fuller, Gary and Monks, Paul S and Tomlin, Alison and Karl, Thomas and Hort, Matthew and Mohr, Claudia and MacKenzie, Rob and Vlachou, Athanasia and Tian, Zhe and Kramer, Louisa J and Heard, Dwayne and Purvis, Ruth and Querol, Xavier and Baltensperger, Urs and Dunmore, Rachel and Harrison, Roy and Murrells, Tim and Jimenez, Jose L and Cross, Eben and McFiggans, Gordon and Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid and Ho, Tzer-Ren and Charron, Aurélie and Wallington, Timothy and Krishna Kumar, Nivedita and Pieber, Simone and Geiger, Franz and Wahner, Andreas and Mitchell, Edward and Prévôt, André and Skouloudis, Andreas and Kalberer, Markus and McDonald, Brian and Hewitt, C N and Sioutas, Costas and Donahue, Neil. M and Lee, James and van Pinxteren, Dominik and Moller, Sarah and Minguillón, María Cruz and Shafer, Martin and Carslaw, David and Ehlers, Christian and Pandis, Spyros},\n journal = {Faraday Discuss.}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Sea spray aerosol as a unique source of ice nucleating particles.\n \n\n\n \n DeMott, P., J.; Hill, T., C., J.; McCluskey, C., S.; Prather, K., A.; Collins, D., B.; Sullivan, R., C.; Ruppel, M., J.; Mason, R., H.; Irish, V., E.; Lee, T.; Hwang, C., Y.; Rhee, T., S.; Snider, J., R.; McMeeking, G., R.; Dhaniyala, S.; Lewis, E., R.; Wentzell, J., J., B.; Abbatt, J.; Lee, C.; Sultana, C., M.; Ault, A., P.; Axson, J., L.; Diaz Martinez, M.; Venero, I.; Santos-Figueroa, G.; Stokes, M., D.; Deane, G., B.; Mayol-Bracero, O., L.; Grassian, V., H.; Bertram, T., H.; Bertram, A., K.; Moffett, B., F.; and Franc, G., D.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 113(21): 5797-5803. 5 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"SeaWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Sea spray aerosol as a unique source of ice nucleating particles},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {5797-5803},\n volume = {113},\n websites = {http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2015/12/17/1514034112.abstract,http://www.pnas.org/lookup/doi/10.1073/pnas.1514034112},\n month = {5},\n day = {24},\n id = {ad5ff4df-a3c9-3963-bf7e-f97430ce5a1e},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n accessed = {2015-12-28},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {true},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {DeMott2015a},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {Ice nucleating particles (INPs) are vital for ice initiation in, and precipitation from, mixed-phase clouds. A source of INPs from oceans within sea spray aerosol (SSA) emissions has been suggested in previous studies but remained unconfirmed. Here, we show that INPs are emitted using real wave breaking in a laboratory flume to produce SSA. The number concentrations of INPs from laboratory-generated SSA, when normalized to typical total aerosol number concentrations in the marine boundary layer, agree well with measurements from diverse regions over the oceans. Data in the present study are also in accord with previously published INP measurements made over remote ocean regions. INP number concentrations active within liquid water droplets increase exponentially in number with a decrease in temperature below 0 °C, averaging an order of magnitude increase per 5 °C interval. The plausibility of a strong increase in SSA INP emissions in association with phytoplankton blooms is also shown in laboratory simulations. Nevertheless, INP number concentrations, or active site densities approximated using "dry" geometric SSA surface areas, are a few orders of magnitude lower than corresponding concentrations or site densities in the surface boundary layer over continental regions. These findings have important implications for cloud radiative forcing and precipitation within low-level and midlevel marine clouds unaffected by continental INP sources, such as may occur over the Southern Ocean.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {DeMott, Paul J and Hill, Thomas C J and McCluskey, Christina S and Prather, Kimberly A and Collins, Douglas B and Sullivan, Ryan C and Ruppel, Matthew J and Mason, Ryan H and Irish, Victoria E and Lee, Taehyoung and Hwang, Chung Yeon and Rhee, Tae Siek and Snider, Jefferson R and McMeeking, Gavin R and Dhaniyala, Suresh and Lewis, Ernie R and Wentzell, Jeremy J B and Abbatt, Jonathan and Lee, Christopher and Sultana, Camille M and Ault, Andrew P and Axson, Jessica L and Diaz Martinez, Myrelis and Venero, Ingrid and Santos-Figueroa, Gilmarie and Stokes, M Dale and Deane, Grant B and Mayol-Bracero, Olga L and Grassian, Vicki H and Bertram, Timothy H. and Bertram, Allan K and Moffett, Bruce F and Franc, Gary D},\n journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},\n number = {21}\n}
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\n Ice nucleating particles (INPs) are vital for ice initiation in, and precipitation from, mixed-phase clouds. A source of INPs from oceans within sea spray aerosol (SSA) emissions has been suggested in previous studies but remained unconfirmed. Here, we show that INPs are emitted using real wave breaking in a laboratory flume to produce SSA. The number concentrations of INPs from laboratory-generated SSA, when normalized to typical total aerosol number concentrations in the marine boundary layer, agree well with measurements from diverse regions over the oceans. Data in the present study are also in accord with previously published INP measurements made over remote ocean regions. INP number concentrations active within liquid water droplets increase exponentially in number with a decrease in temperature below 0 °C, averaging an order of magnitude increase per 5 °C interval. The plausibility of a strong increase in SSA INP emissions in association with phytoplankton blooms is also shown in laboratory simulations. Nevertheless, INP number concentrations, or active site densities approximated using \"dry\" geometric SSA surface areas, are a few orders of magnitude lower than corresponding concentrations or site densities in the surface boundary layer over continental regions. These findings have important implications for cloud radiative forcing and precipitation within low-level and midlevel marine clouds unaffected by continental INP sources, such as may occur over the Southern Ocean.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Simulating the formation of carbonaceous aerosol in a European Megacity (Paris) during the MEGAPOLI summer and winter campaigns.\n \n\n\n \n Fountoukis, C.; Megaritis, A., G.; Skyllakou, K.; Charalampidis, P., E.; van der Gon, H., A., C., D.; Crippa, M.; Prevot, A., S., H.; Fachinger, F.; Wiedensohler, A.; Pilinis, C.; and Pandis, S., N.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS, 16(6): 3727-3741. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Simulating the formation of carbonaceous aerosol in a European Megacity (Paris) during the MEGAPOLI summer and winter campaigns},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {3727-3741},\n volume = {16},\n id = {b01eb854-34cd-3880-8b6a-0e6f6400371e},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000374702300004},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {We use a three-dimensional regional chemical transport model (PMCAMx)\nwith high grid resolution and high-resolution emissions (4 x 4 km(2))\nover the Paris greater area to simulate the formation of carbonaceous\naerosol during a summer (July 2009) and a winter (January/February 2010)\nperiod as part of the MEGAPOLI (megacities: emissions, urban, regional,\nand global atmospheric pollution and climate effects, and Integrated\ntools for assessment and mitigation) campaigns. Model predictions of\ncarbonaceous aerosol are compared against Aerodyne aerosol mass\nspectrometer and black carbon (BC) high time resolution measurements\nfrom three ground sites. PMCAMx predicts BC concentrations reasonably\nwell reproducing the majority (70aEuro-%) of the hourly data within a\nfactor of two during both periods. The agreement for the summertime\nsecondary organic aerosol (OA) concentrations is also encouraging (mean\nbias = 0.1 A mu g m(-3)) during a photochemically intense period. The\nmodel tends to underpredict the summertime primary OA concentrations in\nthe Paris greater area (by approximately 0.8 A mu g m(-3)) mainly due to\nmissing primary OA emissions from cooking activities. The total cooking\nemissions are estimated to be approximately 80 mg d(-1) per capita and\nhave a distinct diurnal profile in which 50 % of the daily cooking OA\nis emitted during lunch time (12:00-14:00 LT) and 20 % during dinner\ntime (20:00-22:00 LT). Results also show a large underestimation of\nsecondary OA in the Paris greater area during wintertime (mean bias =\naEuro-a'2.3 A mu g m(-3)) pointing towards a secondary OA formation\nprocess during low photochemical activity periods that is not simulated\nin the model.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Fountoukis, Christos and Megaritis, Athanasios G and Skyllakou, Ksakousti and Charalampidis, Panagiotis E and van der Gon, Hugo A C Denier and Crippa, Monica and Prevot, Andre S H and Fachinger, Friederike and Wiedensohler, Alfred and Pilinis, Christodoulos and Pandis, Spyros N},\n journal = {ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS},\n number = {6}\n}
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\n We use a three-dimensional regional chemical transport model (PMCAMx)\nwith high grid resolution and high-resolution emissions (4 x 4 km(2))\nover the Paris greater area to simulate the formation of carbonaceous\naerosol during a summer (July 2009) and a winter (January/February 2010)\nperiod as part of the MEGAPOLI (megacities: emissions, urban, regional,\nand global atmospheric pollution and climate effects, and Integrated\ntools for assessment and mitigation) campaigns. Model predictions of\ncarbonaceous aerosol are compared against Aerodyne aerosol mass\nspectrometer and black carbon (BC) high time resolution measurements\nfrom three ground sites. PMCAMx predicts BC concentrations reasonably\nwell reproducing the majority (70aEuro-%) of the hourly data within a\nfactor of two during both periods. The agreement for the summertime\nsecondary organic aerosol (OA) concentrations is also encouraging (mean\nbias = 0.1 A mu g m(-3)) during a photochemically intense period. The\nmodel tends to underpredict the summertime primary OA concentrations in\nthe Paris greater area (by approximately 0.8 A mu g m(-3)) mainly due to\nmissing primary OA emissions from cooking activities. The total cooking\nemissions are estimated to be approximately 80 mg d(-1) per capita and\nhave a distinct diurnal profile in which 50 % of the daily cooking OA\nis emitted during lunch time (12:00-14:00 LT) and 20 % during dinner\ntime (20:00-22:00 LT). Results also show a large underestimation of\nsecondary OA in the Paris greater area during wintertime (mean bias =\naEuro-a'2.3 A mu g m(-3)) pointing towards a secondary OA formation\nprocess during low photochemical activity periods that is not simulated\nin the model.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS).\n \n\n\n \n Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N., M.; Dunne, E., M.; Flagan, R., C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M., P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J., N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P., M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D., R.; and Curtius, J.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres, 121: 3036-3049. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"EffectWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS)},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {3036-3049},\n volume = {121},\n websites = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2015JD023868},\n id = {6967466c-8d25-37bb-b7bc-ec4faaa40203},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Rondo:jgra:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Rondo, L and Ehrhart, S and Kürten, A and Adamov, A and Bianchi, F and Breitenlechner, M and Duplissy, J and Franchin, A and Dommen, J and Donahue, N M and Dunne, E M and Flagan, R C and Hakala, J and Hansel, A and Keskinen, H and Kim, J and Jokinen, T and Lehtipalo, K and Leiminger, M and Praplan, A and Riccobono, F and Rissanen, M P and Sarnela, N and Schobesberger, S and Simon, M and Sipilä, M and Smith, J N and Tomé, A and Tröstl, J and Tsagkogeorgas, G and Vaattovaara, P and Winkler, P M and Williamson, C and Wimmer, D and Baltensperger, U and Kirkby, J and Kulmala, M and Petäjä, T and Worsnop, D R and Curtius, J},\n journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Uptake of semi-volatile secondary organic aerosol formed from $α$-pinene into non-volatile polyethylene glycol probe particles.\n \n\n\n \n Ye, P.; Ding, X.; Ye, Q.; Robinson, E., S.; and Donahue, N., M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Journal of Physical Chemistry A, 120: 1459-1467. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"UptakeWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Uptake of semi-volatile secondary organic aerosol formed from $α$-pinene into non-volatile polyethylene glycol probe particles},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {1459-1467},\n volume = {120},\n websites = {http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/acs.jpca.5b07435},\n id = {0809af1f-f455-30b2-8ff5-b00a0f943a5c},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {PYe:jpca:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Ye, Penglin and Ding, Xiang and Ye, Qing and Robinson, E S and Donahue, N M},\n journal = {Journal of Physical Chemistry A}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Observation of viscosity transition in $α$-pinene secondary organic aerosol.\n \n\n\n \n Järvinen, E.; Ignatius, K.; Nichman, L.; Kristensen, T., B.; Fuchs, C.; Hoyle, C., R.; Höppel, N.; Corbin, J., C.; Craven, J.; Duplissy, J.; Ehrhart, S.; El Haddad, I.; Frege, C.; Gordon, H.; Jokinen, T.; Kallinger, P.; Kirkby, J.; Kiselev, A.; Naumann, K.; Petäjä, T.; Pinterich, T.; Prevot, A., S., H.; Saathoff, H.; Schiebel, T.; Sengupta, K.; Simon, M.; Slowik, J., G.; Tröstl, J.; Virtanen, A.; Vochezer, P.; Vogt, S.; Wagner, A., C.; Wagner, R.; Williamson, C.; Winkler, P., M.; Yan, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Donahue, N., M.; Flagan, R., C.; Gallagher, M.; Hansel, A.; Kulmala, M.; Stratmann, F.; Worsnop, D., R.; Möhler, O.; Leisner, T.; and Schnaiter, M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 16: 4423-4438. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"ObservationWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Observation of viscosity transition in $α$-pinene secondary organic aerosol},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {4423-4438},\n volume = {16},\n websites = {http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/16/4423/2016/},\n id = {df833949-689c-3258-b3ba-512f41487f5a},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Jaervinen:acp:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Järvinen, E and Ignatius, K and Nichman, L and Kristensen, T B and Fuchs, C and Hoyle, C R and Höppel, N and Corbin, J C and Craven, J and Duplissy, J and Ehrhart, S and El Haddad, I and Frege, C and Gordon, H and Jokinen, T and Kallinger, P and Kirkby, J and Kiselev, A and Naumann, K.-H. and Petäjä, T and Pinterich, T and Prevot, A S H and Saathoff, H and Schiebel, T and Sengupta, K and Simon, M and Slowik, J G and Tröstl, J and Virtanen, A and Vochezer, P and Vogt, S and Wagner, A C and Wagner, R and Williamson, C and Winkler, P M and Yan, C and Baltensperger, U and Donahue, N M and Flagan, R C and Gallagher, M and Hansel, A and Kulmala, M and Stratmann, F and Worsnop, D R and Möhler, O and Leisner, T and Schnaiter, M},\n journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Estimating Ambient Particulate Organic Carbon Concentrations and Partitioning Using Thermal Optical Measurements and the Volatility Basis Set.\n \n\n\n \n Ma, J.; Li, X.; Gu, P.; Dallmann, T., R.; Presto, A., A.; and Donahue, N., M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Aerosol Science and Technology, 50: 638-651. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"EstimatingWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Estimating Ambient Particulate Organic Carbon Concentrations and Partitioning Using Thermal Optical Measurements and the Volatility Basis Set},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {638-651},\n volume = {50},\n websites = {http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/suppl/10.1080/02786826.2016.1158778},\n id = {59542bc4-a847-3d81-8275-c8cbee84b997},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Ma:ast:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Ma, J and Li, Xiang and Gu, Peishi and Dallmann, T R and Presto, A A and Donahue, N M},\n journal = {Aerosol Science and Technology}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Optical properties of black carbon in cookstove emissions coated with secondary organic aerosols: Measurements and modeling.\n \n\n\n \n Saliba, G.; Subramanian, R.; Saleh, R.; Ahern, A., T.; Lipsky, E., M.; Tasoglou, A.; Sullivan, R., C.; Bhandari, J.; Mazzoleni, C.; and Robinson, A., L.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Aerosol Science and Technology, 50(11): 1264-1276. 11 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"OpticalWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Optical properties of black carbon in cookstove emissions coated with secondary organic aerosols: Measurements and modeling},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n keywords = {Thomas Kirchstetter},\n pages = {1264-1276},\n volume = {50},\n websites = {https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02786826.2016.1225947},\n month = {11},\n publisher = {Taylor & Francis},\n day = {22},\n id = {1072ccbc-b1c1-3c20-a4f9-fcd20254fb67},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n accessed = {2016-09-14},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {true},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Saliba2016},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {ABSTRACTCookstoves are a major source of black carbon (BC) particles and associated organic compounds, which influence the atmospheric radiative balance. We present results from experiments that characterize BC emissions from a rocket stove coated with secondary organic aerosol. Optical properties, namely, BC mass absorption cross-section (MACBC) and mass scattering cross-section (MSC), as a function of the organic-to-black carbon ratio (OA:BC) of fresh and aged cookstove emissions were compared with Mie and Rayleigh–Debye–Gans (RDG) calculations. Mie theory reproduced the measured MACBC across the entire OA:BC range. However, Mie theory failed to capture the MSC at low OA:BC, where the data agreed better with RDG, consistent with a fractal morphology of fresh BC aggregates. As the OA:BC increased, the MSC approached Mie predictions indicating that BC-containing particles approach a core–shell structure as BC cores become heavily coated. To gain insight into the implications of our findings, we calculated...},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Saliba, Georges and Subramanian, R. and Saleh, Rawad and Ahern, Adam T. and Lipsky, Eric M. and Tasoglou, Antonios and Sullivan, Ryan C. and Bhandari, Janarjan and Mazzoleni, Claudio and Robinson, Allen L.},\n journal = {Aerosol Science and Technology},\n number = {11}\n}
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\n ABSTRACTCookstoves are a major source of black carbon (BC) particles and associated organic compounds, which influence the atmospheric radiative balance. We present results from experiments that characterize BC emissions from a rocket stove coated with secondary organic aerosol. Optical properties, namely, BC mass absorption cross-section (MACBC) and mass scattering cross-section (MSC), as a function of the organic-to-black carbon ratio (OA:BC) of fresh and aged cookstove emissions were compared with Mie and Rayleigh–Debye–Gans (RDG) calculations. Mie theory reproduced the measured MACBC across the entire OA:BC range. However, Mie theory failed to capture the MSC at low OA:BC, where the data agreed better with RDG, consistent with a fractal morphology of fresh BC aggregates. As the OA:BC increased, the MSC approached Mie predictions indicating that BC-containing particles approach a core–shell structure as BC cores become heavily coated. To gain insight into the implications of our findings, we calculated...\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Reactions of atmospheric particulate stabilized Criegee intermediates lead to high molecular weight aerosol components.\n \n\n\n \n Wang, M.; Yao, L.; Zheng, J.; X., W.; Chen, J.; Yang, X.; Worsnop, D., R.; Donahue, N., M.; and Wang, L.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Environmental Science & Technology, 50: 5702-5710. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"ReactionsWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Reactions of atmospheric particulate stabilized Criegee intermediates lead to high molecular weight aerosol components},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {5702-5710},\n volume = {50},\n websites = {http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.est.6b02114},\n id = {50b3a117-90ac-369c-80f7-b5c0aaa34c4a},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {MYWang:est:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Wang, M and Yao, L and Zheng, J and X., Wang and Chen, J and Yang, X and Worsnop, D R and Donahue, N M and Wang, L},\n journal = {Environmental Science & Technology}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n The unstable ice nucleation properties of Snomax® bacterial particles.\n \n\n\n \n Polen, M.; Lawlis, E.; and Sullivan, R., C.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 121(19): 11,666-11,678. 10 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"TheWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {The unstable ice nucleation properties of Snomax® bacterial particles},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {11,666-11,678},\n volume = {121},\n websites = {http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JD025251},\n month = {10},\n day = {16},\n id = {9ba7fa1d-702f-34a2-b4ab-166486ca67fa},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {true},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Polen2016},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Polen, Michael and Lawlis, Emily and Sullivan, Ryan C.},\n journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres},\n number = {19}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Advanced aerosol optical tweezers chamber design to facilitate phase-separation and equilibration timescale experiments on complex droplets.\n \n\n\n \n Gorkowski, K.; Beydoun, H.; Aboff, M.; Walker, J., S.; Reid, J., P.; and Sullivan, R., C.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Aerosol Science and Technology, 1-15. 8 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"AdvancedWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Advanced aerosol optical tweezers chamber design to facilitate phase-separation and equilibration timescale experiments on complex droplets},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n keywords = {Thomas Kirchstetter},\n pages = {1-15},\n websites = {https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02786826.2016.1224317},\n month = {8},\n publisher = {Taylor & Francis},\n day = {15},\n id = {5103dd6b-fc5b-30e2-bbdc-003bd7db6875},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n accessed = {2016-09-25},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {true},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Gorkowski2016},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {ABSTRACTThe phase-separation of mixed aerosol particles and the resulting morphology plays an important role in determining the interactions of liquid aerosols with their gas-phase environment. We present the application of a new aerosol optical tweezers chamber for delivering a uniformly mixed aerosol flow to the trapped droplet's position for performing experiments that determine the phase-separation and resulting properties of complex mixed droplets. This facilitates stable trapping when adding additional phases through aerosol coagulation, and reproducible measurements of the droplet's equilibration timescale. We demonstrate the trapping of pure organic carbon droplets, which allows us to study the morphology of droplets containing pure hydrocarbon phases to which a second phase is added by coagulation. A series of experiments using simple compounds are presented to establish our ability to use the cavity enhanced Raman spectra to distinguish between homogeneous single-phase, and phase-separated core–...},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Gorkowski, Kyle and Beydoun, Hassan and Aboff, Mark and Walker, Jim S. and Reid, Jonathan P. and Sullivan, Ryan C.},\n journal = {Aerosol Science and Technology}\n}
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\n ABSTRACTThe phase-separation of mixed aerosol particles and the resulting morphology plays an important role in determining the interactions of liquid aerosols with their gas-phase environment. We present the application of a new aerosol optical tweezers chamber for delivering a uniformly mixed aerosol flow to the trapped droplet's position for performing experiments that determine the phase-separation and resulting properties of complex mixed droplets. This facilitates stable trapping when adding additional phases through aerosol coagulation, and reproducible measurements of the droplet's equilibration timescale. We demonstrate the trapping of pure organic carbon droplets, which allows us to study the morphology of droplets containing pure hydrocarbon phases to which a second phase is added by coagulation. A series of experiments using simple compounds are presented to establish our ability to use the cavity enhanced Raman spectra to distinguish between homogeneous single-phase, and phase-separated core–...\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Reduced anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing caused by biogenic new particle formation.\n \n\n\n \n Gordon, H.; Sengupta, K.; Rap, A.; Duplissy, J.; Frege, C.; Williamson, C.; Heinritzi, M.; Simon, M.; Yan, C.; Almeida, J.; Tröstl, J.; Nieminen, T.; Ortega, I., K.; Wagner, R.; Dunne, E., M.; Adamov, A.; Amorim, A.; Bernhammer, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Brilke, S.; Chen, X.; Craven, J., S.; Dias, A.; Ehrhart, S.; Fischer, L.; Flagan, R., C.; Franchin, A.; Fuchs, C.; Guida, R.; Hakala, J.; Hoyle, C., R.; Jokinen, T.; Junninen, H.; Kangasluoma, J.; Kim, J.; Kirkby, J.; Krapf, M.; Kürten, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Makhmutov, V.; Mathot, S.; Molteni, U.; Monks, S., A.; Onnela, A.; Peräkylä, O.; Piel, F.; Petäjä, T.; Praplan, A., P.; Pringle, K., J.; Richards, N., A., D.; Rissanen, M., P.; Rondo, L.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Scott, C., E.; Seinfeld, J., H.; Sharma, S.; Sipilä, M.; Steiner, G.; Stozhkov, Y.; Stratmann, F.; Tomé, A.; Virtanen, A.; Vogel, A., L.; Wagner, A., C.; Wagner, P., E.; Weingartner, E.; Wimmer, D.; Winkler, P., M.; Ye, P.; Zhang, X.; Hansel, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N., M.; Worsnop, D., R.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Curtius, J.; and Carslaw, K., S.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 113(43): 12053-12058. 10 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"ReducedWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Reduced anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing caused by biogenic new particle formation},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {12053-12058},\n volume = {113},\n websites = {http://www.pnas.org/lookup/doi/10.1073/pnas.1602360113},\n month = {10},\n publisher = {National Academy of Sciences},\n day = {25},\n id = {69fc7f80-940a-37ae-89b2-37295bb50ae0},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n accessed = {2016-10-25},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {false},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Gordon2016},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Gordon, Hamish and Sengupta, Kamalika and Rap, Alexandru and Duplissy, Jonathan and Frege, Carla and Williamson, Christina and Heinritzi, Martin and Simon, Mario and Yan, Chao and Almeida, João and Tröstl, Jasmin and Nieminen, Tuomo and Ortega, Ismael K. and Wagner, Robert and Dunne, Eimear M. and Adamov, Alexey and Amorim, Antonio and Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin and Bianchi, Federico and Breitenlechner, Martin and Brilke, Sophia and Chen, Xuemeng and Craven, Jill S. and Dias, Antonio and Ehrhart, Sebastian and Fischer, Lukas and Flagan, Richard C. and Franchin, Alessandro and Fuchs, Claudia and Guida, Roberto and Hakala, Jani and Hoyle, Christopher R. and Jokinen, Tuija and Junninen, Heikki and Kangasluoma, Juha and Kim, Jaeseok and Kirkby, Jasper and Krapf, Manuel and Kürten, Andreas and Laaksonen, Ari and Lehtipalo, Katrianne and Makhmutov, Vladimir and Mathot, Serge and Molteni, Ugo and Monks, Sarah A. and Onnela, Antti and Peräkylä, Otso and Piel, Felix and Petäjä, Tuukka and Praplan, Arnaud P. and Pringle, Kirsty J. and Richards, Nigel A. D. and Rissanen, Matti P. and Rondo, Linda and Sarnela, Nina and Schobesberger, Siegfried and Scott, Catherine E. and Seinfeld, John H. and Sharma, Sangeeta and Sipilä, Mikko and Steiner, Gerhard and Stozhkov, Yuri and Stratmann, Frank and Tomé, Antonio and Virtanen, Annele and Vogel, Alexander Lucas and Wagner, Andrea C. and Wagner, Paul E. and Weingartner, Ernest and Wimmer, Daniela and Winkler, Paul M. and Ye, Penglin and Zhang, Xuan and Hansel, Armin and Dommen, Josef and Donahue, Neil M. and Worsnop, Douglas R. and Baltensperger, Urs and Kulmala, Markku and Curtius, Joachim and Carslaw, Kenneth S.},\n journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},\n number = {43}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Simulations of Aerosol Filteration by Vegetation: Validation of Existing Models with Available Lab Data and Application to Near-Roadway Scenario.\n \n\n\n \n Neft, I.; Scungio, M.; Culver, N.; and Singh, S.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Aerosol Science and Technology, In Press, . 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Simulations of Aerosol Filteration by Vegetation: Validation of Existing Models with Available Lab Data and Application to Near-Roadway Scenario},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n id = {7971a175-dfb9-30bc-9069-aa014a4381e3},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {neft_ast_2016},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Neft, I and Scungio, M and Culver, N and Singh, S},\n journal = {Aerosol Science and Technology, In Press}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Discrimination of Water, Ice and Aerosols by light polarisation in the CLOUD experiment.\n \n\n\n \n Nichman, L.; Fuchs, C.; Järvinen, E.; Ignatius, K.; Höppel, N., F.; Dias, A.; Heinritzi, M.; Simon, M.; Tröstl, J.; Wagner, A., C.; Wagner, R.; Williamson, C.; Yan, C.; Bianchi, F.; Connolly, P., J.; Dorsey, J., R.; Duplissy, J.; Ehrhart, S.; Frege, C.; Gordon, H.; Hoyle, C., R.; Kristensen, T., B.; Steiner, G.; Donahue, N., M.; Flagan, R.; Gallagher, M., W.; Kirkby, J.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Stratmann, F.; and Tomé, A.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 16: 3651-3664. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"DiscriminationWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Discrimination of Water, Ice and Aerosols by light polarisation in the CLOUD experiment},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {3651-3664},\n volume = {16},\n websites = {http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/16/3651/2016/},\n id = {b603f9dc-5c8d-3c7c-ba14-5120f08facd6},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Nichman:acp:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Nichman, L and Fuchs, C and Järvinen, E and Ignatius, K and Höppel, N F and Dias, A and Heinritzi, M and Simon, M and Tröstl, J and Wagner, A C and Wagner, R and Williamson, C and Yan, C and Bianchi, F and Connolly, P J and Dorsey, J R and Duplissy, J and Ehrhart, S and Frege, C and Gordon, H and Hoyle, C R and Kristensen, T B and Steiner, G and Donahue, N M and Flagan, R and Gallagher, M W and Kirkby, J and Möhler, O and Saathoff, H and Schnaiter, M and Stratmann, F and Tomé, A},\n journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Saturation Vapor Pressures of $α$-pinene Autoxidation Products May Be Severely Underpredicted by Group Contribution Methods.\n \n\n\n \n Kurtén, T.; Tiusanen, K.; Roldin, P.; Rissanen, M.; Luy, J.; and Donahue, N., M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Journal of Physical Chemistry A, 120: 2569-2582. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"SaturationWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Saturation Vapor Pressures of $α$-pinene Autoxidation Products May Be Severely Underpredicted by Group Contribution Methods},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {2569-2582},\n volume = {120},\n websites = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpca.6b02196},\n id = {fbd1660a-2467-3197-a273-59b20d7869b7},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Kurten:jpca:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Kurtén, Theo and Tiusanen, Kirsi and Roldin, Pontus and Rissanen, Matti and Luy, Jan-Niclas and Donahue, Neil M},\n journal = {Journal of Physical Chemistry A}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Volatility of organic aerosol and its components in the megacity of Paris.\n \n\n\n \n Paciga, A.; Karnezi, E.; Kostenidou, E.; Hildebrandt, L.; Psichoudaki, M.; Engelhart, G., J.; Lee, B.; Crippa, M.; Prevot, A., S., H.; Baltensperger, U.; and Pandis, S., N.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS, 16(4): 2013-2023. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Volatility of organic aerosol and its components in the megacity of Paris},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {2013-2023},\n volume = {16},\n id = {9bdcb7ff-cbae-38ee-9eb0-3fcb76ecffc0},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000372971500011},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {Using a mass transfer model and the volatility basis set, we estimate\nthe volatility distribution for the organic aerosol (OA) components\nduring summer and winter in Paris, France as part of the collaborative\nproject MEGAPOLI. The concentrations of the OA components as a function\nof temperature were measured combining data from a thermodenuder and an\naerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF)\nanalysis. The hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) had similar\nvolatility distributions for the summer and winter campaigns with half\nof the material in the saturation concentration bin of 10 mu g m(-3) and\nanother 35-40% consisting of low and extremely low volatility organic\ncompounds (LVOCs with effective saturation concentrations C* of\n10(-3)-0.1 mu g m(-3) and ELVOCs C* less or equal than 10(-4) mu g\nm(-3), respectively). The winter cooking OA (COA) was more than an order\nof magnitude less volatile than the summer COA. The low-volatility\noxygenated OA (LV-OOA) factor detected in the summer had the lowest\nvolatility of all the derived factors and consisted almost exclusively\nof ELVOCs. The volatility for the semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA)\nwas significantly higher than that of the LV-OOA, containing both\nsemi-volatile organic components (SVOCs with C* in the 1-100 mu g\nm(-3) range) and LVOCs. The oxygenated OA (OOA) factor in winter\ncon-sisted of SVOCs (45 %), LVOCs (25 %) and ELVOCs (30 %). The\nvolatility of marine OA (MOA) was higher than that of the other factors\ncontaining around 60% SVOCs. The biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor\ncontained components with a wide range of volatilities with significant\ncontributions from both SVOCs (50 %) and LVOCs (30 %). Finally,\ncombining the bulk average O:C ratios and volatility distributions of\nthe various factors, our results are placed into the two-dimensional\nvolatility basis set (2D-VBS) framework. The OA factors cover a broad\nspectrum of volatilities with no direct link between the average\nvolatility and average O:C of the OA components.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Paciga, Andrea and Karnezi, Eleni and Kostenidou, Evangelia and Hildebrandt, Lea and Psichoudaki, Magda and Engelhart, Gabriella J and Lee, Byong-Hyoek and Crippa, Monica and Prevot, Andre S H and Baltensperger, Urs and Pandis, Spyros N},\n journal = {ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS},\n number = {4}\n}
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\n Using a mass transfer model and the volatility basis set, we estimate\nthe volatility distribution for the organic aerosol (OA) components\nduring summer and winter in Paris, France as part of the collaborative\nproject MEGAPOLI. The concentrations of the OA components as a function\nof temperature were measured combining data from a thermodenuder and an\naerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF)\nanalysis. The hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) had similar\nvolatility distributions for the summer and winter campaigns with half\nof the material in the saturation concentration bin of 10 mu g m(-3) and\nanother 35-40% consisting of low and extremely low volatility organic\ncompounds (LVOCs with effective saturation concentrations C* of\n10(-3)-0.1 mu g m(-3) and ELVOCs C* less or equal than 10(-4) mu g\nm(-3), respectively). The winter cooking OA (COA) was more than an order\nof magnitude less volatile than the summer COA. The low-volatility\noxygenated OA (LV-OOA) factor detected in the summer had the lowest\nvolatility of all the derived factors and consisted almost exclusively\nof ELVOCs. The volatility for the semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA)\nwas significantly higher than that of the LV-OOA, containing both\nsemi-volatile organic components (SVOCs with C* in the 1-100 mu g\nm(-3) range) and LVOCs. The oxygenated OA (OOA) factor in winter\ncon-sisted of SVOCs (45 %), LVOCs (25 %) and ELVOCs (30 %). The\nvolatility of marine OA (MOA) was higher than that of the other factors\ncontaining around 60% SVOCs. The biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor\ncontained components with a wide range of volatilities with significant\ncontributions from both SVOCs (50 %) and LVOCs (30 %). Finally,\ncombining the bulk average O:C ratios and volatility distributions of\nthe various factors, our results are placed into the two-dimensional\nvolatility basis set (2D-VBS) framework. The OA factors cover a broad\nspectrum of volatilities with no direct link between the average\nvolatility and average O:C of the OA components.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Measurement of nonvolatile particle number size distribution.\n \n\n\n \n Gkatzelis, G., I.; Papanastasiou, D., K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; and Pandis, S., N.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n ATMOSPHERIC MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES, 9(1): 103-114. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
\n
@article{\n title = {Measurement of nonvolatile particle number size distribution},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {103-114},\n volume = {9},\n id = {5a331bcf-5a5a-372f-adbf-81505f9c24c1},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000375610500009},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {An experimental methodology was developed to measure the nonvolatile\nparticle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was\ncoupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer,\nmeasuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the\nsubmicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that\nprovided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from\n10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber\nexperiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of\nsecondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD\ntemperature of 400 degrees C and a centerline residence time of 15 s.\nThis experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in\nAthens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and\nsize distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources.\nDuring periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was\ndominant, more than 80% of particle number concentration remained after\npassing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass\nburning particles had a nonvolatile core. These remaining particles\nconsisted mostly of black carbon (60% mass contribution) and organic\naerosol (OA; 40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD\nwere mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as\ndetermined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during\nwhich traffic contribution was dominant 50-60% of the particles had a\nnonvolatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 degrees C. The\nremaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon with an 80%\ncontribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics\nwere mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest\nthat even at 400 degrees C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate\nfrom particles emitted from com-mon combustion processes, such as\nbiomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type\nof OA is of extremely low volatility.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Gkatzelis, G I and Papanastasiou, D K and Florou, K and Kaltsonoudis, C and Louvaris, E and Pandis, S N},\n journal = {ATMOSPHERIC MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES},\n number = {1}\n}
\n
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\n An experimental methodology was developed to measure the nonvolatile\nparticle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was\ncoupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer,\nmeasuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the\nsubmicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that\nprovided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from\n10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber\nexperiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of\nsecondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD\ntemperature of 400 degrees C and a centerline residence time of 15 s.\nThis experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in\nAthens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and\nsize distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources.\nDuring periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was\ndominant, more than 80% of particle number concentration remained after\npassing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass\nburning particles had a nonvolatile core. These remaining particles\nconsisted mostly of black carbon (60% mass contribution) and organic\naerosol (OA; 40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD\nwere mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as\ndetermined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during\nwhich traffic contribution was dominant 50-60% of the particles had a\nnonvolatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 degrees C. The\nremaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon with an 80%\ncontribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics\nwere mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest\nthat even at 400 degrees C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate\nfrom particles emitted from com-mon combustion processes, such as\nbiomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type\nof OA is of extremely low volatility.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Where Did This Particle Come From? Sources of Particle Number and Mass for Human Exposure Estimates.\n \n\n\n \n Donahue, N., M.; Posner, L., N.; Westervelt, D., M.; Li, Z.; Shrivastava, M.; Presto, A., A.; Sullivan, R., C.; Adams, P., J.; Pandis, S., N.; and Robinson, A., L.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Volume 42 . pages 35-71. Royal Society of Chemistry, 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"WhereWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
\n
@inBook{\n title = {Where Did This Particle Come From? Sources of Particle Number and Mass for Human Exposure Estimates},\n type = {inBook},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {35-71},\n volume = {42},\n websites = {http://ebook.rsc.org/?DOI=10.1039/9781782626589-00035},\n publisher = {Royal Society of Chemistry},\n editors = {[object Object],[object Object],[object Object]},\n id = {85a3310b-453b-3c59-a58f-e1aebeb0a822},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n accessed = {2016-09-28},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Donahue:iest:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {Atmospheric chemistry dominates the size distribution and composition of most fine particles inhaled by humans. However, it is important to distinguish between secondary particles—new particles formed in the atmosphere—and secondary mass—molecules formed in the atmosphere that condense to existing particles. In many ways the life stories of particles viewed from the perspectives of particle number concentrations and particle mass concentrations are distinct. Individual particle cores can often be said to have an individual source, while the mass on individual particles comes from myriad sources. This, plus the aforementioned chemical processing in the atmosphere, must be kept in mind when considering the health effects of fine particles.},\n bibtype = {inBook},\n author = {Donahue, Neil M. and Posner, Laura N. and Westervelt, Daniel M. and Li, Zhongju and Shrivastava, Manish and Presto, Albert A. and Sullivan, Ryan C. and Adams, Peter J. and Pandis, Spyros N. and Robinson, Allen L.},\n book = {Issues in Environmental Science and Technology}\n}
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\n Atmospheric chemistry dominates the size distribution and composition of most fine particles inhaled by humans. However, it is important to distinguish between secondary particles—new particles formed in the atmosphere—and secondary mass—molecules formed in the atmosphere that condense to existing particles. In many ways the life stories of particles viewed from the perspectives of particle number concentrations and particle mass concentrations are distinct. Individual particle cores can often be said to have an individual source, while the mass on individual particles comes from myriad sources. This, plus the aforementioned chemical processing in the atmosphere, must be kept in mind when considering the health effects of fine particles.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Effect of ions on sulfuric acid-water binary particle formation II: Experimental data and comparison with QC-normalized classical nucleation theory.\n \n\n\n \n Duplissy, J.; Merikanto, J.; Franchin, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Kangasluoma, J.; Wimmer, D.; Vuollekoski, H.; Schobesberger, S.; Lehtipalo, K.; Flagan, R., C.; Brus, D.; Donahue, N., M.; Vehkamäki, H.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Barmet, P.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Dunne, E., M.; Guida, R.; Henschel, H.; Junninen, H.; Kirkby, J.; Kürten, A.; Kupc, A.; Määttänen, A.; Makhmutov, V.; Mathot, S.; Nieminen, T.; Onnela, A.; Praplan, A., P.; Riccobono, F.; Rondo, L.; Steiner, G.; Tome, A.; Walther, H.; Baltensperger, U.; Carslaw, K., S.; Dommen, J.; Hansel, A.; Petäjä, T.; Sipilä, M.; Stratmann, F.; Vrtala, A.; Wagner, P., E.; Worsnop, D., R.; Curtius, J.; and Kulmala, M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres, 212: 1752-1775. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"EffectWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
\n
@article{\n title = {Effect of ions on sulfuric acid-water binary particle formation II: Experimental data and comparison with QC-normalized classical nucleation theory},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {1752-1775},\n volume = {212},\n websites = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2015JD023539},\n id = {07c131f5-895d-334b-aab6-21029fbbc1e7},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Duplissy:jgra:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Duplissy, J and Merikanto, J and Franchin, A and Tsagkogeorgas, G and Kangasluoma, J and Wimmer, D and Vuollekoski, H and Schobesberger, S and Lehtipalo, K and Flagan, R C and Brus, D and Donahue, N M and Vehkamäki, H and Almeida, J and Amorim, A and Barmet, P and Bianchi, F and Breitenlechner, M and Dunne, E M and Guida, R and Henschel, H and Junninen, H and Kirkby, J and Kürten, A and Kupc, A and Määttänen, A and Makhmutov, V and Mathot, S and Nieminen, T and Onnela, A and Praplan, A P and Riccobono, F and Rondo, L and Steiner, G and Tome, A and Walther, H and Baltensperger, U and Carslaw, K S and Dommen, J and Hansel, A and Petäjä, T and Sipilä, M and Stratmann, F and Vrtala, A and Wagner, P E and Worsnop, D R and Curtius, J and Kulmala, M},\n journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Mixing of secondary organic aerosols versus relative humidity.\n \n\n\n \n Ye, Q.; Robinson, E., S.; Ding, X.; Ye, P.; Sullivan, R., C.; and Donahue, N., M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 113(45): 12649-12654. 11 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"MixingWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
\n
@article{\n title = {Mixing of secondary organic aerosols versus relative humidity},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {12649-12654},\n volume = {113},\n websites = {http://www.pnas.org/lookup/doi/10.1073/pnas.1604536113},\n month = {11},\n day = {8},\n id = {804d15af-b07c-356c-b572-1d8e1183c15a},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {true},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Ye2016},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Ye, Qing and Robinson, Ellis Shipley and Ding, Xiang and Ye, Penglin and Sullivan, Ryan C. and Donahue, Neil M.},\n journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},\n number = {45}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Quantifying the effect of organic aerosol aging and intermediate-volatility emissions on regional-scale aerosol pollution in China.\n \n\n\n \n Zhao, B.; Wang, S.; Donahue, N., M.; Jathar, S., H.; Huang, X.; Wu, W.; Hao, J.; and Robinson, A., L.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Scientific Reports, 6: 28815. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"QuantifyingWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Quantifying the effect of organic aerosol aging and intermediate-volatility emissions on regional-scale aerosol pollution in China},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {28815},\n volume = {6},\n websites = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep28815},\n id = {331cd1f2-788d-38c2-93d7-d250b0e0a2cb},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Zhao:scirep:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Zhao, Bin and Wang, Shuxiao and Donahue, Neil M and Jathar, Shantanu H and Huang, Xiaofeng and Wu, Wenjing and Hao, Jiming and Robinson, Allen L},\n journal = {Scientific Reports}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Low-volatility organic compounds are key to initial particle growth in the atmosphere.\n \n\n\n \n Tröstl, J.; Chuang, W., K.; Heinritzi, M.; Yan, C.; Molteni, U.; Ahlm, L.; Frege, C.; Bianchi, F.; Wagner, R.; Simon, M.; Lehtipalo, K.; Williamson, C.; Craven, J., S.; Duplissy, J.; Adamov, A.; Almeida, J.; Bernhammer, A.; Breitenlechner, M.; Brilke, S.; Dias, A.; Ehrhart, S.; Flagan, R., C.; Franchin, A.; Fuchs, C.; Gordon, H.; Guida, R.; Gysel, M.; Hansel, A.; Hoyle, C., R.; Jokinen, T.; Junninen, H.; Kangasluoma, J.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Krapf, M.; Kürten, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lawler, M.; Leiminger, M.; Mathot, S.; Möhler, O.; Nieminen, T.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Piel, F., M.; Miettinen, P.; Rissanen, M., P.; Rondo, L.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Sengupta, K.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J., N.; Steiner, G.; Tomè, A.; Virtanen, A.; Wagner, A., C.; Weingartner, E.; Wimmer, D.; Winkler, P., M.; Ye, P.; Carslaw, K., S.; Curtius, J.; Dommen, J.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Riipinen, I.; Worsnop, D., R.; Donahue, N., M.; and Baltensperger, U.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Nature, 530: 527-531. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"Low-volatilityWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Low-volatility organic compounds are key to initial particle growth in the atmosphere},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {527-531},\n volume = {530},\n websites = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature18271},\n id = {368b5e5b-33b5-39c6-a8ff-1a8237876f64},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Troestl:nature:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Tröstl, Jasmin and Chuang, Wayne K and Heinritzi, Martin and Yan, Chao and Molteni, Ugo and Ahlm, Lars and Frege, Carla and Bianchi, Federico and Wagner, Robert and Simon, Mario and Lehtipalo, Katrianne and Williamson, Christina and Craven, Jill S and Duplissy, Jonathan and Adamov, Alexey and Almeida, Joao and Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin and Breitenlechner, Martin and Brilke, Sophia and Dias, Antònio and Ehrhart, Sebastian and Flagan, Richard C and Franchin, Alessandro and Fuchs, Claudia and Gordon, Hamish and Guida, Roberto and Gysel, Martin and Hansel, Armin and Hoyle, Christopher R and Jokinen, Tuija and Junninen, Heikki and Kangasluoma, Juha and Keskinen, Helmi and Kim, Jaeseok and Krapf, Manuel and Kürten, Andreas and Laaksonen, Ari and Lawler, Michael and Leiminger, Markus and Mathot, Serge and Möhler, Ottmar and Nieminen, Tuomo and Onnela, Antti and Petäjä, Tuukka and Piel, Felix M and Miettinen, Pasi and Rissanen, Matti P and Rondo, Linda and Sarnela, Nina and Schobesberger, Siegfried and Sengupta, Kamalika and Sipilä, Mikko and Smith, James N and Steiner, Gerhard and Tomè, Antònio and Virtanen, Annele and Wagner, Andrea C and Weingartner, Ernest and Wimmer, Daniela and Winkler, Paul M and Ye, Penglin and Carslaw, Kenneth S and Curtius, Joachim and Dommen, Josef and Kirkby, Jasper and Kulmala, Markku and Riipinen, Ilona and Worsnop, Douglas R and Donahue, Neil M and Baltensperger, Urs},\n journal = {Nature}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n The interplay between assumed morphology and the direct radiative effect of light-absorbing organic aerosol.\n \n\n\n \n Saleh, R.; Donahue, N., M.; Robinson, A., L.; and Adams, P., J.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Geophysical Research Letters, in press. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {The interplay between assumed morphology and the direct radiative effect of light-absorbing organic aerosol},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n volume = {in press},\n id = {6400c896-d66a-36ed-9a3d-3b0dcf57eacf},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Saleh:grl:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Saleh, R and Donahue, N M and Robinson, A L and Adams, P J},\n journal = {Geophysical Research Letters}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Hygroscopicity of nanoparticles produced from homogeneous nucleation in the CLOUD experiments.\n \n\n\n \n Kim, J.; Ahlm, L.; Keskinen, H.; Lawler, M.; Tröstl, J.; Duplissy, J.; Yli-Juuti, T.; Lehtinen, E., J.; Smith, J.; Riipinen, I.; Kürten, A.; Bianchi, F.; Donahue, N., M.; Miettinen, P.; Amorim, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Tomé, A.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Hakala, J.; Kirkby, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Sengupta, K.; Rondo, L.; Heinritzi, M.; Winkler, P., M.; P, M.; Rissanen; Simon, M.; Ye, P.; Flagan, R., C.; Schobesberger, S.; Jokinen, T.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; and Virtanen, A.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 16: 293-304. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"HygroscopicityWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Hygroscopicity of nanoparticles produced from homogeneous nucleation in the CLOUD experiments},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {293-304},\n volume = {16},\n websites = {http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/16/293/2016/},\n id = {6baef4aa-34d2-39a5-94b0-6a6bc23ff7de},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Kim:acp:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Kim, J and Ahlm, L and Keskinen, H and Lawler, M and Tröstl, J and Duplissy, J and Yli-Juuti, T and Lehtinen, E J and Smith, J and Riipinen, I and Kürten, A and Bianchi, F and Donahue, N M and Miettinen, P and Amorim, A and Laaksonen, A and Tomé, A and Williamson, C and Wimmer, D and Hakala, J and Kirkby, J and Lehtipalo, K and Sengupta, K and Rondo, L and Heinritzi, M and Winkler, P M and P, M and Rissanen, undefined and Simon, M and Ye, Penglin and Flagan, R C and Schobesberger, S and Jokinen, T and Petäjä, T and Kulmala, M and Virtanen, A},\n journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Black Carbon Emissions from Associated Natural Gas Flaring.\n \n\n\n \n Weyant, C., L.; Shepson, P., B.; Subramanian, R.; Cambaliza, M., O., L.; Heimburger, A.; McCabe, D.; Baum, E.; Stirm, B., H.; and Bone, T., C.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Environmental Science & Technology, 50(4): 2075-2081. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Black Carbon Emissions from Associated Natural Gas Flaring},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {2075-2081},\n volume = {50},\n id = {60b5939f-fa56-3f21-94e7-511eb940c72f},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:26.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Weyant2016},\n source_type = {JOUR},\n notes = {Times Cited: 0<br/>Weyant, Cheryl L. Shepson, Paul B. Subramanian, R. Cambaliza, Maria O. L. Heimburger, Alexie McCabe, David Baum, Ellen Stirm, Brian H. Bone, Tami C.<br/>0<br/>1520-5851},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Weyant, C L and Shepson, P B and Subramanian, R and Cambaliza, M O L and Heimburger, A and McCabe, D and Baum, E and Stirm, B H and Bone, T C},\n journal = {Environmental Science & Technology},\n number = {4}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Aqueous phase oxidation of sulphur dioxide by ozone in cloud droplets.\n \n\n\n \n Hoyle, C., R.; Fuchs, C.; Järvinen, E.; Saathoff, H.; Dias, A.; El Haddad, I.; Gysel, M.; Coburn, S., C.; Tröstl, J.; Bernhammer, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Corbin, J., C.; Craven, J.; Donahue, N., M.; Duplissy, J.; Ehrhart, S.; Frege, C.; Gordon, H.; Höppel, N.; Heinritzi, M.; Kristensen, T., B.; Molteni, U.; Nichman, L.; Pinterich, T.; Prévôt, A., S., H.; Simon, M.; Slowik, J., G.; Steiner, G.; Tomé, A.; Vogel, A., L.; Volkamer, R.; Wagner, A., C.; Wagner, R.; Wexler, A., S.; Williamson, C.; Winkler, P., M.; Yan, C.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Curtius, J.; Gallagher, M., W.; Flagan, R., C.; Hansel, A.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Möhler, O.; Stratmann, F.; Worsnop, D., R.; and Baltensperger, U.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 16: 1693-1712. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"AqueousWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Aqueous phase oxidation of sulphur dioxide by ozone in cloud droplets},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {1693-1712},\n volume = {16},\n websites = {http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/16/1693/2016/},\n id = {147017bb-67d7-3de6-947d-cf2b27270147},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:26.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Hoyle:acp:2016a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Hoyle, C R and Fuchs, C and Järvinen, E and Saathoff, H and Dias, A and El Haddad, I and Gysel, M and Coburn, S C and Tröstl, J and Bernhammer, A.-K. and Bianchi, F and Breitenlechner, M and Corbin, J C and Craven, J and Donahue, N M and Duplissy, J and Ehrhart, S and Frege, C and Gordon, H and Höppel, N and Heinritzi, M and Kristensen, T B and Molteni, U and Nichman, L and Pinterich, T and Prévôt, A S H and Simon, M and Slowik, J G and Steiner, G and Tomé, A and Vogel, A L and Volkamer, R and Wagner, A C and Wagner, R and Wexler, A S and Williamson, C and Winkler, P M and Yan, C and Amorim, A and Dommen, J and Curtius, J and Gallagher, M W and Flagan, R C and Hansel, A and Kirkby, J and Kulmala, M and Möhler, O and Stratmann, F and Worsnop, D R and Baltensperger, U},\n journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Estimation of the local and long-range contributions to particulate matter levels using continuous measurements in a single urban background site.\n \n\n\n \n Diamantopoulou, M.; Skyllakou, K.; and Pandis, S., N.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT, 134: 1-9. 6 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Estimation of the local and long-range contributions to particulate matter levels using continuous measurements in a single urban background site},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {1-9},\n volume = {134},\n month = {6},\n id = {0144a0f3-313a-361f-8fc2-edd5f72801a2},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:26.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000375504100001},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {The Particulate Matter Source Apportionment Technology (PSAT) algorithm\nis used together with PMCAMx, a regional chemical transport model, to\ndevelop a simple observation-based method (OBM) for the estimation of\nlocal and regional contributions of sources of primary and secondary\npollutants in urban areas. We test the hypothesis that the minimum of\nthe diurnal average concentration profile of the pollutant is a good\nestimate of the average contribution of long range transport levels. We\nuse PMCAMx to generate ``pseudo-observations'' for four different\nEuropean cities (Paris, London, Milan, and Dusseldorf) and PSAT to\nestimate the corresponding ``true'' local and regional contributions.\nThe predictions of the proposed OBM are compared to the ``true''\nvalues for different definitions of the source area.\nDuring winter, the estimates by the OBM for the local contributions to\nthe concentrations of total PM2.5, primary pollutants, and sulfate are\nwithin 25% of the ``true'' contributions of the urban area sources.\nFor secondary organic aerosol the OBM overestimates the importance of\nthe local sources and it actually estimates the contributions of sources\nwithin 200 km from the receptor.\nDuring summer for primary pollutants and cities with low nearby\nemissions (ratio of emissions in an area extending 100 km from the city\nover local emissions lower than 10) the OBM estimates correspond to the\ncity emissions within 25% or so. For cities with relatively high nearby\nemissions the OBM estimates correspond to emissions within 100 km from\nthe receptor. For secondary PM2.5 components like sulfate and secondary\norganic aerosol the OBM's estimates correspond to sources within 200 km\nfrom the receptor. Finally, for total PM2.5 the OBM provides\napproximately the contribution of city emissions during the winter and\nthe contribution of sources within 100 km from the receptor during the\nsummer. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Diamantopoulou, Marianna and Skyllakou, Ksakousti and Pandis, Spyros N},\n journal = {ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT}\n}
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\n The Particulate Matter Source Apportionment Technology (PSAT) algorithm\nis used together with PMCAMx, a regional chemical transport model, to\ndevelop a simple observation-based method (OBM) for the estimation of\nlocal and regional contributions of sources of primary and secondary\npollutants in urban areas. We test the hypothesis that the minimum of\nthe diurnal average concentration profile of the pollutant is a good\nestimate of the average contribution of long range transport levels. We\nuse PMCAMx to generate ``pseudo-observations'' for four different\nEuropean cities (Paris, London, Milan, and Dusseldorf) and PSAT to\nestimate the corresponding ``true'' local and regional contributions.\nThe predictions of the proposed OBM are compared to the ``true''\nvalues for different definitions of the source area.\nDuring winter, the estimates by the OBM for the local contributions to\nthe concentrations of total PM2.5, primary pollutants, and sulfate are\nwithin 25% of the ``true'' contributions of the urban area sources.\nFor secondary organic aerosol the OBM overestimates the importance of\nthe local sources and it actually estimates the contributions of sources\nwithin 200 km from the receptor.\nDuring summer for primary pollutants and cities with low nearby\nemissions (ratio of emissions in an area extending 100 km from the city\nover local emissions lower than 10) the OBM estimates correspond to the\ncity emissions within 25% or so. For cities with relatively high nearby\nemissions the OBM estimates correspond to emissions within 100 km from\nthe receptor. For secondary PM2.5 components like sulfate and secondary\norganic aerosol the OBM's estimates correspond to sources within 200 km\nfrom the receptor. Finally, for total PM2.5 the OBM provides\napproximately the contribution of city emissions during the winter and\nthe contribution of sources within 100 km from the receptor during the\nsummer. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Simulations of vehicle induced mixing and near-road aerosol microphysics using computational fluid dynamics.\n \n\n\n \n Singh, S.; Adams, P., J.; and Presto, A., A.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Environment, Submitted. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Simulations of vehicle induced mixing and near-road aerosol microphysics using computational fluid dynamics},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n volume = {Submitted},\n id = {69b3e8f1-c3c8-3111-9f53-20437304021d},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:26.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {singh_atm_2016},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Singh, S and Adams, P J and Presto, A A},\n journal = {Atmospheric Environment}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Methane Emissions from Conventional and Unconventional Natural Gas Production Sites in the Marcellus Shale Basin.\n \n\n\n \n Omara, M.; Sullivan, M., R.; Li, X.; Subramanian, R.; Robinson, A., L.; and Presto, A., A.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Environmental Science & Technology, 50(4): 2099-2107. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Methane Emissions from Conventional and Unconventional Natural Gas Production Sites in the Marcellus Shale Basin},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {2099-2107},\n volume = {50},\n id = {d5cc1873-72a5-3308-8e59-247bb981d7af},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:26.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Omara2016},\n source_type = {JOUR},\n notes = {Times Cited: 1<br/>Omara, Mark Sullivan, Melissa R. Li, Xiang Subramanian, R. Robinson, Allen L. Presto, Albert A.<br/>Presto, Albert/C-3193-2008; Robinson, Allen/M-3046-2014<br/>Presto, Albert/0000-0002-9156-1094; Robinson, Allen/0000-0002-1819-083X<br/>1<br/>1520-5851},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Omara, M and Sullivan, M R and Li, X and Subramanian, R and Robinson, A L and Presto, A A},\n journal = {Environmental Science & Technology},\n number = {4}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Application of plume analysis to build land use regression models from mobile sampling to improve model transferability.\n \n\n\n \n Tan, Y.; Dallmann, T., R.; Robinson, A., L.; and Presto, A., A.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Environment, 134: 51-60. 2016.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"ApplicationWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Application of plume analysis to build land use regression models from mobile sampling to improve model transferability},\n type = {article},\n year = {2016},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {51-60},\n volume = {134},\n websites = {%3CGo,to},\n id = {811a8d14-9097-383a-9421-c0029b4ea105},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:26.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {RN1182},\n source_type = {article},\n user_context = {Journal Article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Tan, Y and Dallmann, T R and Robinson, A L and Presto, A A},\n journal = {Atmospheric Environment}\n}
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\n  \n 2015\n \n \n (42)\n \n \n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n In situ, satellite measurement and model evidence on the dominant regional contribution to fine particulate matter levels in the Paris megacity.\n \n\n\n \n Beekmann, M.; Prevot, A., S., H.; Drewnick, F.; Sciare, J.; Pandis, S., N.; van der Gon, H., A., C., D.; Crippa, M.; Freutel, F.; Poulain, L.; Ghersi, V.; Rodriguez, E.; Beirle, S.; Zotter, P.; von der Weiden-Reinmueller, S., -.; Bressi, M.; Fountoukis, C.; Petetin, H.; Szidat, S.; Schneider, J.; Rosso, A.; El Haddad, I.; Megaritis, A.; Zhang, Q., J.; Michoud, V.; Slowik, J., G.; Moukhtar, S.; Kolmonen, P.; Stohl, A.; Eckhardt, S.; Borbon, A.; Gros, V.; Marchand, N.; Jaffrezo, J., L.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Colomb, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Borrmann, S.; Lawrence, M.; Baklanov, A.; and Baltensperger, U.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS, 15(16): 9577-9591. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {In situ, satellite measurement and model evidence on the dominant regional contribution to fine particulate matter levels in the Paris megacity},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {9577-9591},\n volume = {15},\n id = {423ea65a-8352-32d5-b0a0-a47ef33e6ba9},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:21.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000360646500028},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {A detailed characterization of air quality in the megacity of Paris\n(France) during two 1-month intensive campaigns and from additional\n1-year observations revealed that about 70% of the urban background\nfine particulate matter (PM) is transported on average into the megacity\nfrom upwind regions. This dominant influence of regional sources was\nconfirmed by in situ measurements during short intensive and longer-term\ncampaigns, aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements from ENVISAT, and\nmodeling results from PMCAMx and CHIMERE chemistry transport models.\nWhile advection of sulfate is well documented for other megacities,\nthere was surprisingly high contribution from long-range transport for\nboth nitrate and organic aerosol. The origin of organic PM was\ninvestigated by comprehensive analysis of aerosol mass spectrometer\n(AMS), radiocarbon and tracer measurements during two intensive\ncampaigns. Primary fossil fuel combustion emissions constituted less\nthan 20% in winter and 40% in summer of carbonaceous fine PM,\nunexpectedly small for a megacity. Cooking activities and, during\nwinter, residential wood burning are the major primary organic PM\nsources. This analysis suggests that the major part of secondary organic\naerosol is of modern origin, i.e., from biogenic precursors and from\nwood burning. Black carbon concentrations are on the lower end of values\nencountered in megacities worldwide, but still represent an issue for\nair quality. These comparatively low air pollution levels are due to a\ncombination of low emissions per inhabitant, flat terrain, and a\nmeteorology that is in general not conducive to local pollution\nbuild-up. This revised picture of a megacity only being partially\nresponsible for its own average and peak PM levels has important\nimplications for air pollution regulation policies.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Beekmann, M and Prevot, A S H and Drewnick, F and Sciare, J and Pandis, S N and van der Gon, H A C Denier and Crippa, M and Freutel, F and Poulain, L and Ghersi, V and Rodriguez, E and Beirle, S and Zotter, P and von der Weiden-Reinmueller, S -L. and Bressi, M and Fountoukis, C and Petetin, H and Szidat, S and Schneider, J and Rosso, A and El Haddad, I and Megaritis, A and Zhang, Q J and Michoud, V and Slowik, J G and Moukhtar, S and Kolmonen, P and Stohl, A and Eckhardt, S and Borbon, A and Gros, V and Marchand, N and Jaffrezo, J L and Schwarzenboeck, A and Colomb, A and Wiedensohler, A and Borrmann, S and Lawrence, M and Baklanov, A and Baltensperger, U},\n journal = {ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS},\n number = {16}\n}
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\n A detailed characterization of air quality in the megacity of Paris\n(France) during two 1-month intensive campaigns and from additional\n1-year observations revealed that about 70% of the urban background\nfine particulate matter (PM) is transported on average into the megacity\nfrom upwind regions. This dominant influence of regional sources was\nconfirmed by in situ measurements during short intensive and longer-term\ncampaigns, aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements from ENVISAT, and\nmodeling results from PMCAMx and CHIMERE chemistry transport models.\nWhile advection of sulfate is well documented for other megacities,\nthere was surprisingly high contribution from long-range transport for\nboth nitrate and organic aerosol. The origin of organic PM was\ninvestigated by comprehensive analysis of aerosol mass spectrometer\n(AMS), radiocarbon and tracer measurements during two intensive\ncampaigns. Primary fossil fuel combustion emissions constituted less\nthan 20% in winter and 40% in summer of carbonaceous fine PM,\nunexpectedly small for a megacity. Cooking activities and, during\nwinter, residential wood burning are the major primary organic PM\nsources. This analysis suggests that the major part of secondary organic\naerosol is of modern origin, i.e., from biogenic precursors and from\nwood burning. Black carbon concentrations are on the lower end of values\nencountered in megacities worldwide, but still represent an issue for\nair quality. These comparatively low air pollution levels are due to a\ncombination of low emissions per inhabitant, flat terrain, and a\nmeteorology that is in general not conducive to local pollution\nbuild-up. This revised picture of a megacity only being partially\nresponsible for its own average and peak PM levels has important\nimplications for air pollution regulation policies.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Evaluation of the ability of the EC tracer method to estimate secondary organic carbon.\n \n\n\n \n Day, M., C.; Zhang, M.; and Pandis, S., N.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT, 112: 317-325. 7 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Evaluation of the ability of the EC tracer method to estimate secondary organic carbon},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {317-325},\n volume = {112},\n month = {7},\n id = {4e423733-d1c8-3b38-b4db-91e8e1c3783b},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:21.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000356190800032},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {The elemental carbon (EC) tracer method has often been used to estimate\nthe primary and secondary organic aerosol (OA) fractions using field\nmeasurements of organic carbon (OC) and EC. In this observation-based\napproach, EC is used as a tracer for primary OC (POC), which allows for\nthe estimation of secondary OC (SOC). The accuracy of this approach is\nevaluated using concentrations generated by PMCAMx, a three-dimensional\nchemical transport model that simulates the complex processes leading to\nSOC formation (including evaporation and chemical processing of POC and\nchemical aging of semivolatile and intermediate volatility organics).\nThe ratio of primary organic to elemental carbon [OC/EC](p) is\nestimated in various locations in the Eastern United States, and is then\nused to calculate the primary and secondary OC concentrations. To\nestimate the [OC/EC](p) from simulated concentrations, we use both a\ntraditional approach and the high EC edge method, in which only values\nwith the highest EC/OC ratio are used. Both methods perform best on a\ndaily-averaged basis, because of the variability of the [OC/EC](p)\nratio during the day. The SOC estimated by the EC tracer methods\ncorresponds to the biogenic and anthropogenic SOC formed during the\noxidation of volatile organic compounds. On the other hand, the\nestimated POC corresponds to the sum of the fresh POC, the SOC from\noxidation of the evaporated POC and the intermediate volatility organic\ncompounds, and the OC from long-distance transport. With this\ncorrespondence, the traditional EC tracer method tends to overpredict\nprimary OC and underpredict secondary OC for the selected urban areas in\nthe eastern United States. The high EC edge method performs better,\nespecially in areas where the primary contribution to OC is smaller.\nDespite the weaknesses of models like the one used here, the conclusions\nabout the accuracy of observation-based methods like the EC-tracer\napproach should be relatively robust due to the internal consistency of\nthe data and the approach. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Day, Melissa C and Zhang, Minghui and Pandis, Spyros N},\n journal = {ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT}\n}
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\n The elemental carbon (EC) tracer method has often been used to estimate\nthe primary and secondary organic aerosol (OA) fractions using field\nmeasurements of organic carbon (OC) and EC. In this observation-based\napproach, EC is used as a tracer for primary OC (POC), which allows for\nthe estimation of secondary OC (SOC). The accuracy of this approach is\nevaluated using concentrations generated by PMCAMx, a three-dimensional\nchemical transport model that simulates the complex processes leading to\nSOC formation (including evaporation and chemical processing of POC and\nchemical aging of semivolatile and intermediate volatility organics).\nThe ratio of primary organic to elemental carbon [OC/EC](p) is\nestimated in various locations in the Eastern United States, and is then\nused to calculate the primary and secondary OC concentrations. To\nestimate the [OC/EC](p) from simulated concentrations, we use both a\ntraditional approach and the high EC edge method, in which only values\nwith the highest EC/OC ratio are used. Both methods perform best on a\ndaily-averaged basis, because of the variability of the [OC/EC](p)\nratio during the day. The SOC estimated by the EC tracer methods\ncorresponds to the biogenic and anthropogenic SOC formed during the\noxidation of volatile organic compounds. On the other hand, the\nestimated POC corresponds to the sum of the fresh POC, the SOC from\noxidation of the evaporated POC and the intermediate volatility organic\ncompounds, and the OC from long-distance transport. With this\ncorrespondence, the traditional EC tracer method tends to overpredict\nprimary OC and underpredict secondary OC for the selected urban areas in\nthe eastern United States. The high EC edge method performs better,\nespecially in areas where the primary contribution to OC is smaller.\nDespite the weaknesses of models like the one used here, the conclusions\nabout the accuracy of observation-based methods like the EC-tracer\napproach should be relatively robust due to the internal consistency of\nthe data and the approach. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Improvement of Simulation of Fine Inorganic PM Levels through Better Descriptions of Coarse Particle Chemistry.\n \n\n\n \n Trump, E., R.; Fountoukis, C.; Donahue, N., M.; and Pandis, S., N.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Environment, 102: 274-281. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"ImprovementWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Improvement of Simulation of Fine Inorganic PM Levels through Better Descriptions of Coarse Particle Chemistry},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {274-281},\n volume = {102},\n websites = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231014009315},\n id = {4f7ea646-273f-38ed-be3a-c4b88c81dd37},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:21.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Trump:ae:2015a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Trump, E R and Fountoukis, C and Donahue, N M and Pandis, S N},\n journal = {Atmospheric Environment}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Reconciling divergent estimates of oil and gas methane emissions.\n \n\n\n \n Zavala-Araiza, D.; Lyon, D., R.; Alvarez, R., A.; Davis, K., J.; Harriss, R.; Herndon, S., C.; Karion, A.; Kort, E., A.; Lamb, B., K.; Lan, X.; Marchese, A., J.; Pacala, S., W.; Robinson, A., L.; Shepson, P., B.; Sweeney, C.; Talbot, R.; Townsend-Small, A.; Yacovitch, T., I.; Zimmerle, D., J.; and Hamburg, S., P.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 112(51): 15597-15602. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Reconciling divergent estimates of oil and gas methane emissions},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {15597-15602},\n volume = {112},\n id = {2db5b684-5bb3-3d34-99ef-97cdeb1d1654},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:22.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Zavala-Araiza2015},\n source_type = {Journal Article},\n short_title = {Reconciling divergent estimates of oil and gas met},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Zavala-Araiza, Daniel and Lyon, David R and Alvarez, Ramon A and Davis, Kenneth J and Harriss, Robert and Herndon, Scott C and Karion, Anna and Kort, Eric Adam and Lamb, Brian K and Lan, Xin and Marchese, Anthony J and Pacala, Stephen W and Robinson, Allen L and Shepson, Paul B and Sweeney, Colm and Talbot, Robert and Townsend-Small, Amy and Yacovitch, Tara I and Zimmerle, Daniel J and Hamburg, Steven P},\n journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},\n number = {51}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Connecting the solubility and CCN activation of complex organic aerosols: a theoretical study using solubility distributions.\n \n\n\n \n Riipinen, I.; Rastak, N.; and Pandis, S., N.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS, 15(11): 6305-6322. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Connecting the solubility and CCN activation of complex organic aerosols: a theoretical study using solubility distributions},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {6305-6322},\n volume = {15},\n id = {d8b3e2e1-4df4-361d-b5f3-1c02617c79ea},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:22.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000356180900019},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {We present a theoretical study investigating the cloud activation of\nmulticomponent organic particles. We modeled these complex mixtures\nusing solubility distributions (analogous to volatility distributions in\nthe VBS, i.e., volatility basis set, approach), describing the mixture\nas a set of surrogate compounds with varying water solubilities in a\ngiven range. We conducted Khler theory calculations for 144 different\nmixtures with varying solubility range, number of components, assumption\nabout the organic mixture thermodynamics and the shape of the solubility\ndistribution, yielding approximately 6000 unique cloud condensation\nnucleus (CCN)-activation points. The results from these comprehensive\ncalculations were compared to three simplifying assumptions about\norganic aerosol solubility: (1) complete dissolution at the point of\nactivation; (2) combining the aerosol solubility with the molar mass and\ndensity into a single effective hygroscopicity parameter kappa; and (3)\nassuming a fixed water-soluble fraction `` eff. The complete dissolution\nwas able to reproduce the activation points with a reasonable accuracy\nonly when the majority (70-80 %) of the material was dissolved at the\npoint of activation. The single-parameter representations of complex\nmixture solubility were confirmed to be powerful semi-empirical tools\nfor representing the CCN activation of organic aerosol, predicting the\nactivation diameter within 10% in most of the studied supersaturations.\nDepending mostly on the condensedphase interactions between the organic\nmolecules, material with solubilities larger than about 0.1-100 g L-1\ncould be treated as soluble in the CCN activation process over\natmospherically relevant particle dry diameters and supersaturations.\nOur results indicate that understanding the details of the solubility\ndistribution in the range of 0.1-100 g L-1 is thus critical for\ncapturing the CCN activation, while resolution outside this solubility\nrange will probably not add much information except in some special\ncases. The connections of these results to the previous observations of\nthe CCN activation and the molecular properties of complex organic\nmixture aerosols are discussed. The presented results help unravel the\nmechanistic reasons behind observations of hygroscopic growth and CCN\nactivation of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles. The\nproposed solubility distribution framework is a promising tool for\nmodeling the interlinkages between atmospheric aging, volatility and\nwater uptake of atmospheric organic aerosol.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Riipinen, I and Rastak, N and Pandis, S N},\n journal = {ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS},\n number = {11}\n}
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\n We present a theoretical study investigating the cloud activation of\nmulticomponent organic particles. We modeled these complex mixtures\nusing solubility distributions (analogous to volatility distributions in\nthe VBS, i.e., volatility basis set, approach), describing the mixture\nas a set of surrogate compounds with varying water solubilities in a\ngiven range. We conducted Khler theory calculations for 144 different\nmixtures with varying solubility range, number of components, assumption\nabout the organic mixture thermodynamics and the shape of the solubility\ndistribution, yielding approximately 6000 unique cloud condensation\nnucleus (CCN)-activation points. The results from these comprehensive\ncalculations were compared to three simplifying assumptions about\norganic aerosol solubility: (1) complete dissolution at the point of\nactivation; (2) combining the aerosol solubility with the molar mass and\ndensity into a single effective hygroscopicity parameter kappa; and (3)\nassuming a fixed water-soluble fraction `` eff. The complete dissolution\nwas able to reproduce the activation points with a reasonable accuracy\nonly when the majority (70-80 %) of the material was dissolved at the\npoint of activation. The single-parameter representations of complex\nmixture solubility were confirmed to be powerful semi-empirical tools\nfor representing the CCN activation of organic aerosol, predicting the\nactivation diameter within 10% in most of the studied supersaturations.\nDepending mostly on the condensedphase interactions between the organic\nmolecules, material with solubilities larger than about 0.1-100 g L-1\ncould be treated as soluble in the CCN activation process over\natmospherically relevant particle dry diameters and supersaturations.\nOur results indicate that understanding the details of the solubility\ndistribution in the range of 0.1-100 g L-1 is thus critical for\ncapturing the CCN activation, while resolution outside this solubility\nrange will probably not add much information except in some special\ncases. The connections of these results to the previous observations of\nthe CCN activation and the molecular properties of complex organic\nmixture aerosols are discussed. The presented results help unravel the\nmechanistic reasons behind observations of hygroscopic growth and CCN\nactivation of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles. The\nproposed solubility distribution framework is a promising tool for\nmodeling the interlinkages between atmospheric aging, volatility and\nwater uptake of atmospheric organic aerosol.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Adsorptive uptake of water by semisolid secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere.\n \n\n\n \n Pajunoja, A.; Lambe, A., T.; Hakala, J.; Rastak, N.; Cummings, M., J.; Brognan, J., F.; Hao, L.; Paramonov, M.; Hong, J.; Prisle, N.; Malila, J.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Lehtinen, K.; Laaksonen, A.; Kulmala, M.; Massoli, P.; Onasch, T., B.; Donahue, N., M.; Riipinen, I.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D., R.; Petäjä, T.; and Virtanen, A.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Geophysical Research Letters, 42: 3063-3068. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"AdsorptiveWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Adsorptive uptake of water by semisolid secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {3063-3068},\n volume = {42},\n websites = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015GL063142/full},\n id = {3b667316-ce0f-3b3a-8f3f-7119ef164450},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:22.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Pajunoja:grl:2015a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Pajunoja, A and Lambe, A T and Hakala, J and Rastak, N and Cummings, M J and Brognan, J F and Hao, L and Paramonov, M and Hong, J and Prisle, N and Malila, J and Romakkaniemi, S and Lehtinen, K and Laaksonen, A and Kulmala, M and Massoli, P and Onasch, T B and Donahue, N M and Riipinen, I and Davidovits, P and Worsnop, D R and Petäjä, T and Virtanen, A},\n journal = {Geophysical Research Letters}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Aging of secondary organic aerosol from small aromatic VOCs: changes in chemical composition, mass yield, volatility and hygroscopicity.\n \n\n\n \n Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A.; Cerully, K.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N., M.; and Pandis, S., N.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 15: 8301-8313. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"AgingWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Aging of secondary organic aerosol from small aromatic VOCs: changes in chemical composition, mass yield, volatility and hygroscopicity},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {8301-8313},\n volume = {15},\n websites = {http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/8301/2015/},\n id = {138d7248-5e84-31ab-ad8e-34d564c156fb},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:22.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Hildebrandt:acp:2015a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Hildebrandt Ruiz, L and Paciga, A and Cerully, K and Nenes, A and Donahue, N M and Pandis, S N},\n journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Particulate matter, air quality and climate: lessons learned and future needs.\n \n\n\n \n Fuzzi, S.; Baltensperger, U.; Carslaw, K.; Decesari, S.; Denier van der Gon, H.; Facchini, M., C.; Fowler, D.; Koren, I.; Langford, B.; Lohmann, U.; Nemitz, E.; Pandis, S.; Riipinen, I.; Rudich, Y.; Schaap, M.; Slowik, J., G.; Spracklen, D., V.; Vignati, E.; Wild, M.; Williams, M.; and Gilardoni, S.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 15(14): 8217-8299. 7 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"ParticulateWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Particulate matter, air quality and climate: lessons learned and future needs},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {8217-8299},\n volume = {15},\n websites = {http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/8217/2015/acp-15-8217-2015.html},\n month = {7},\n publisher = {Copernicus GmbH},\n day = {24},\n id = {81782f1f-6481-3b23-85d0-7b5910a8bc7e},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:22.000Z},\n accessed = {2015-07-24},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n tags = {REVIEW},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Fuzzi2015},\n language = {English},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Fuzzi, S. and Baltensperger, U. and Carslaw, K. and Decesari, S. and Denier van der Gon, H. and Facchini, M. C. and Fowler, D. and Koren, I. and Langford, B. and Lohmann, U. and Nemitz, E. and Pandis, S. and Riipinen, I. and Rudich, Y. and Schaap, M. and Slowik, J. G. and Spracklen, D. V. and Vignati, E. and Wild, M. and Williams, M. and Gilardoni, S.},\n journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics},\n number = {14}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Measurements of Methane Emissions from Natural Gas Gathering Facilities and Processing Plants: Measurement Results.\n \n\n\n \n Mitchell, A., L.; Tkacik, D., S.; Roscioli, J., R.; Herndon, S., C.; Yacovitch, T., I.; Martinez, D., M.; Vaughn, T., L.; Williams, L., L.; Sullivan, M., R.; Floerchinger, C.; Omara, M.; Subramanian, R.; Zimmerle, D.; Marchese, A., J.; and Robinson, A., L.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Environmental Science & Technology, 49(5): 3219-3227. 3 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"MeasurementsWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Measurements of Methane Emissions from Natural Gas Gathering Facilities and Processing Plants: Measurement Results},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {3219-3227},\n volume = {49},\n websites = {http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es5052809},\n month = {3},\n day = {3},\n id = {259076df-9c83-325d-ab9f-7acb41cc35f3},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:22.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Mitchell2015},\n source_type = {JOUR},\n short_title = {Measurements of methane emissions from natural gas},\n notes = {<b>From Duplicate 1 (<i>Measurements of Methane Emissions from Natural Gas Gathering Facilities and Processing Plants: Measurement Results</i> - Mitchell, A L; Tkacik, D S; Roscioli, J R; Herndon, S C; Yacovitch, T I; Martinez, D M; Vaughn, T L; Williams, L L; Sullivan, M R; Floerchinger, C; Omara, M; Subramanian, R; Zimmerle, D; Marchese, A J; Robinson, A L)<br/></b><br/>Times Cited: 16<br/>Mitchell, Austin L. Tkacik, Daniel S. Roscioli, Joseph R. Herndon, Scott C. Yacovitch, Tara I. Martinez, David M. Vaughn, Timothy L. Williams, Laurie L. Sullivan, Melissa R. Floerchinger, Cody Omara, Mark Subramanian, R. Zimmerle, Daniel Marchese, Anthony J. Robinson, Allen L.<br/>Tkacik, Daniel/G-5630-2011; Robinson, Allen/M-3046-2014<br/>Robinson, Allen/0000-0002-1819-083X<br/>16<br/>1520-5851<br/><br/><b>From Duplicate 2 (<i>Measurements of Methane Emissions from Natural Gas Gathering Facilities and Processing Plants: Measurement Results (vol 49, pg 3219, 2015)</i> - Mitchell, A L; Tkacik, D S; Roscioli, J R; Herndon, S C; Yacovitch, T I; Martinez, D M; Vaughn, T L; Williams, L; Sullivan, M; Floerchinger, C; Omara, M; Subramanian, R; Zimmerle, D; Marchese, A J; Robinson, A L)<br/></b><br/>Times Cited: 0<br/>Mitchell, Austin L. Tkacik, Daniel S. Roscioli, Joseph R. Herndon, Scott C. Yacovitch, Tara I. Martinez, David M. Vaughn, Timothy L. Williams, Laurie Sullivan, Melissa Floerchinger, Cody Omara, Mark Subramanian, R. Zimmerle, Dan Marchese, Anthony J. Robinson, Allen L.<br/>0<br/>1520-5851},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Mitchell, Austin L and Tkacik, Daniel S and Roscioli, Joseph R and Herndon, Scott C and Yacovitch, Tara I and Martinez, David M and Vaughn, Timothy L and Williams, Laurie L and Sullivan, Melissa R and Floerchinger, Cody and Omara, Mark and Subramanian, R and Zimmerle, Daniel and Marchese, Anthony J and Robinson, Allen L},\n journal = {Environmental Science & Technology},\n number = {5}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Methane Emissions from the Natural Gas Transmission and Storage System in the United States.\n \n\n\n \n Zimmerle, D., J.; Williams, L., L.; Vaughn, T., L.; Quinn, C.; Subramanian, R.; Duggan, G., P.; Willson, B.; Opsomer, J., D.; Marchese, A., J.; Martinez, D., M.; and Robinson, A., L.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Environmental Science & Technology, 49(15): 9374-9383. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Methane Emissions from the Natural Gas Transmission and Storage System in the United States},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {9374-9383},\n volume = {49},\n id = {068d4ba4-3b31-3d64-a23c-f80e92d3deda},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:22.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Zimmerle2015},\n source_type = {JOUR},\n notes = {Times Cited: 6<br/>Zimmerle, Daniel J. Williams, Laurie L. Vaughn, Timothy L. Quinn, Casey Subramanian, R. Duggan, Gerald P. Willson, Bryan Opsomer, Jean D. Marchese, Anthony J. Martinez, David M. Robinson, Allen L.<br/>Robinson, Allen/M-3046-2014<br/>Robinson, Allen/0000-0002-1819-083X<br/>7<br/>1520-5851},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Zimmerle, D J and Williams, L L and Vaughn, T L and Quinn, C and Subramanian, R and Duggan, G P and Willson, B and Opsomer, J D and Marchese, A J and Martinez, D M and Robinson, A L},\n journal = {Environmental Science & Technology},\n number = {15}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n The composition of ammonia-sulfuric acid ion clusters up to 2 nm during particle formation in the CLOUD chamber and in the boreal forest.\n \n\n\n \n Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I., K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E., M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F., D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P., E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N., M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; and Worsnop, D., R.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 15: 55-78. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"TheWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {The composition of ammonia-sulfuric acid ion clusters up to 2 nm during particle formation in the CLOUD chamber and in the boreal forest},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {55-78},\n volume = {15},\n websites = {http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/55/2015/},\n id = {a76ad4b8-82b0-3f99-8a3a-81915654efcf},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:22.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Schobesberger:acp:2015a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Schobesberger, Siegfried and Franchin, Alessandro and Bianchi, Federico and Rondo, Linda and Duplissy, Jonathan and Kürten, Andreas and Ortega, Ismael K and Metzger, Axel and Schnitzhofer, Ralf and Almeida, Joao and Amorim, Antonio and Dommen, Josef and Dunne, Eimear M and Ehn, Mikael and Gagné, Stephanie and Ickes, Luisa and Junninen, Heikki and Hansel, Armin and Kerminen, Veli-Matti and Kirkby, Jasper and Kupc, Agnieszka and Laaksonen, Ari and Lehtipalo, Katrianne and Mathot, Serge and Onnela, Antti and Petäjä, Tuukka and Riccobono, Francesco and Santos, Filipe D and Sipilä, Mikko and Tomé, Antonio and Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios and Viisanen, Yrjo and Wagner, Paul E and Wimmer, Daniela and Curtius, Joachim and Donahue, N M and Baltensperger, Urs and Kulmala, Markku and Worsnop, Douglas R},\n journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Sources of ultrafine particles in the Eastern United States.\n \n\n\n \n Posner, L., N.; and Pandis, S., N.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT, 111: 103-112. 6 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Sources of ultrafine particles in the Eastern United States},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {103-112},\n volume = {111},\n month = {6},\n id = {e9dc6502-0af6-3932-8786-ec36a12f7c35},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000355026100011},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {Source contributions to ultrafine particle number concentrations for a\nsummertime period in the Eastern U.S. are investigated using the\nchemical transport model PMCAMx-UF. New source-resolved number emissions\ninventories are developed for biomass burning, dust, gasoline\nautomobiles, industrial sources, non-road and on-road diesel. According\nto the inventory for this summertime period in the Eastern U.S.,\ngasoline automobiles are responsible for 40% of the ultrafine particle\nnumber emissions, followed by industrial sources (33%), non-road diesel\n(16%), on-road diesel (10%), and 1% from biomass burning and dust.\nWith these emissions as input, the chemical transport model PMCAMx-UF\nreproduces observed ultrafine particle number concentrations (N3-100) in\nPittsburgh with an error of 12%. For this summertime period in the\nEastern U.S., nucleation is predicted to be the source of more than 90%\nof the total particle number concentrations. The source contributions to\nprimary particle number concentrations are on average similar to those\nof their source emissions contributions: gasoline is predicted to\ncontribute 36% of the total particle number concentrations, followed by\nindustrial sources (31%), non-road diesel (18%), on-road diesel\n(10%), biomass burning (1%), and long-range transport (4%). For this\nsummertime period in Pittsburgh, number source apportionment predictions\nfor particles larger than 3 nm in diameter (traffic 65%, other\ncombustion sources 35%) are consistent with measurement-based source\napportionment (traffic 60%, combustion sources 40%). (C) 2015 Elsevier\nLtd. All rights reserved.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Posner, Laura N and Pandis, Spyros N},\n journal = {ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT}\n}
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\n Source contributions to ultrafine particle number concentrations for a\nsummertime period in the Eastern U.S. are investigated using the\nchemical transport model PMCAMx-UF. New source-resolved number emissions\ninventories are developed for biomass burning, dust, gasoline\nautomobiles, industrial sources, non-road and on-road diesel. According\nto the inventory for this summertime period in the Eastern U.S.,\ngasoline automobiles are responsible for 40% of the ultrafine particle\nnumber emissions, followed by industrial sources (33%), non-road diesel\n(16%), on-road diesel (10%), and 1% from biomass burning and dust.\nWith these emissions as input, the chemical transport model PMCAMx-UF\nreproduces observed ultrafine particle number concentrations (N3-100) in\nPittsburgh with an error of 12%. For this summertime period in the\nEastern U.S., nucleation is predicted to be the source of more than 90%\nof the total particle number concentrations. The source contributions to\nprimary particle number concentrations are on average similar to those\nof their source emissions contributions: gasoline is predicted to\ncontribute 36% of the total particle number concentrations, followed by\nindustrial sources (31%), non-road diesel (18%), on-road diesel\n(10%), biomass burning (1%), and long-range transport (4%). For this\nsummertime period in Pittsburgh, number source apportionment predictions\nfor particles larger than 3 nm in diameter (traffic 65%, other\ncombustion sources 35%) are consistent with measurement-based source\napportionment (traffic 60%, combustion sources 40%). (C) 2015 Elsevier\nLtd. All rights reserved.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Particulate emissions from residential wood combustion in Europe revised estimates and an evaluation.\n \n\n\n \n van der Gon, H., A., C., D.; Bergstrom, R.; Fountoukis, C.; Johansson, C.; Pandis, S., N.; Simpson, D.; and Visschedijk, A., J., H.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS, 15(11): 6503-6519. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Particulate emissions from residential wood combustion in Europe revised estimates and an evaluation},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {6503-6519},\n volume = {15},\n id = {d5a6a938-a4fe-3596-8460-3ccb9aa62107},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000356180900032},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {Currently residential wood combustion (RWC) is increasing in Europe\nbecause of rising fossil fuel prices but also due to climate change\nmitigation policies. However, especially in small-scale applications,\nRWC may cause high emissions of particulate matter (PM). Recently we\nhave developed a new high-resolution (7 x 7 km) anthropogenic\ncarbonaceous aerosol emission inventory for Europe. The inventory\nindicated that about half of the total PM2.5 emission in Europe is\ncarbonaceous aerosol and identified RWC as the largest organic aerosol\nsource in Europe. The inventory was partly based on national reported PM\nemissions. Use of this organic aerosol inventory as input for two\nchemical transport models (CTMs), PMCAMx and EMEP MSC-W, revealed major\nunderestimations of organic aerosol in winter time, especially for\nregions dominated by RWC. Interestingly, this was not universal but\nappeared to differ by country.\nIn the present study we constructed a revised bottom-up emission\ninventory for RWC accounting for the semivolatile components of the\nemissions. The revised RWC emissions are higher than those in the\nprevious inventory by a factor of 2-3 but with substantial inter-country\nvariation. The new emission inventory served as input for the CTMs and a\nsubstantially improved agreement between measured and predicted organic\naerosol was found. The revised RWC inven-tory improves the\nmodel-calculated organic aerosol significantly. Comparisons to\nScandinavian source apportionment studies also indicate substantial\nimprovements in the modelled wood-burning component of organic aerosol.\nThis suggests that primary organic aerosol emission inventories need to\nbe revised to include the semivolatile organic aerosol that is formed\nalmost instantaneously due to dilution and cooling of the flue gas or\nexhaust. Since RWC is a key source of fine PM in Europe, a major\nrevision of the emission estimates as proposed here is likely to\ninfluence source-receptor matrices and modelled source apportionment.\nSince usage of biofuels in small combustion units is a globally\nsignificant source, the findings presented here are also relevant for\nregions outside of Europe.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {van der Gon, H A C Denier and Bergstrom, R and Fountoukis, C and Johansson, C and Pandis, S N and Simpson, D and Visschedijk, A J H},\n journal = {ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS},\n number = {11}\n}
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\n Currently residential wood combustion (RWC) is increasing in Europe\nbecause of rising fossil fuel prices but also due to climate change\nmitigation policies. However, especially in small-scale applications,\nRWC may cause high emissions of particulate matter (PM). Recently we\nhave developed a new high-resolution (7 x 7 km) anthropogenic\ncarbonaceous aerosol emission inventory for Europe. The inventory\nindicated that about half of the total PM2.5 emission in Europe is\ncarbonaceous aerosol and identified RWC as the largest organic aerosol\nsource in Europe. The inventory was partly based on national reported PM\nemissions. Use of this organic aerosol inventory as input for two\nchemical transport models (CTMs), PMCAMx and EMEP MSC-W, revealed major\nunderestimations of organic aerosol in winter time, especially for\nregions dominated by RWC. Interestingly, this was not universal but\nappeared to differ by country.\nIn the present study we constructed a revised bottom-up emission\ninventory for RWC accounting for the semivolatile components of the\nemissions. The revised RWC emissions are higher than those in the\nprevious inventory by a factor of 2-3 but with substantial inter-country\nvariation. The new emission inventory served as input for the CTMs and a\nsubstantially improved agreement between measured and predicted organic\naerosol was found. The revised RWC inven-tory improves the\nmodel-calculated organic aerosol significantly. Comparisons to\nScandinavian source apportionment studies also indicate substantial\nimprovements in the modelled wood-burning component of organic aerosol.\nThis suggests that primary organic aerosol emission inventories need to\nbe revised to include the semivolatile organic aerosol that is formed\nalmost instantaneously due to dilution and cooling of the flue gas or\nexhaust. Since RWC is a key source of fine PM in Europe, a major\nrevision of the emission estimates as proposed here is likely to\ninfluence source-receptor matrices and modelled source apportionment.\nSince usage of biofuels in small combustion units is a globally\nsignificant source, the findings presented here are also relevant for\nregions outside of Europe.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Implications of ammonia emissions from post-combustion carbon capture for airborne particulate matter.\n \n\n\n \n Heo, J.; McCoy, S., T.; and Adams, P., J.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Environmental Science & Technology, 49(8): 5142-5150. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Implications of ammonia emissions from post-combustion carbon capture for airborne particulate matter},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {5142-5150},\n volume = {49},\n id = {ded1bbae-1ecb-38ca-aca0-76928f4ad32e},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Heo2015},\n source_type = {Journal Article},\n notes = {Times Cited: 0},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {Amine scrubbing, a mature post-combustion carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology, could increase ambient concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) due to its ammonia emissions. To capture 2.0 Gt CO2/year, for example, it could emit 32 Gg NH3/year in the United States given current design targets or 15 times higher (480 Gg NH3/year) at rates typical of current pilot plants. Employing a chemical transport model, we found that the latter emission rate would cause an increase of 2.0 mug PM2.5/m(3) in nonattainment areas during wintertime, which would be troublesome for PM2.5-burdened areas, and much lower increases during other seasons. Wintertime PM2.5 increases in nonattainment areas were fairly linear at a rate of 3.4 mug PM2.5/m(3) per 1 Tg NH3, allowing these results to be applied to other CCS emissions scenarios. The PM2.5 impacts are modestly uncertain (±20%) depending on future emissions of SO2, NOx, and NH3. The public health costs of CCS NH3 emissions were valued at $31-68 per tonne CO2 captured, comparable to the social cost of carbon itself. Because the costs of solvent loss to CCS operators are lower than the social costs of CCS ammonia, there is a regulatory interest to limit ammonia emissions from CCS.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Heo, Jinhyok and McCoy, Sean T and Adams, Peter J},\n journal = {Environmental Science & Technology},\n number = {8}\n}
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\n Amine scrubbing, a mature post-combustion carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology, could increase ambient concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) due to its ammonia emissions. To capture 2.0 Gt CO2/year, for example, it could emit 32 Gg NH3/year in the United States given current design targets or 15 times higher (480 Gg NH3/year) at rates typical of current pilot plants. Employing a chemical transport model, we found that the latter emission rate would cause an increase of 2.0 mug PM2.5/m(3) in nonattainment areas during wintertime, which would be troublesome for PM2.5-burdened areas, and much lower increases during other seasons. Wintertime PM2.5 increases in nonattainment areas were fairly linear at a rate of 3.4 mug PM2.5/m(3) per 1 Tg NH3, allowing these results to be applied to other CCS emissions scenarios. The PM2.5 impacts are modestly uncertain (±20%) depending on future emissions of SO2, NOx, and NH3. The public health costs of CCS NH3 emissions were valued at $31-68 per tonne CO2 captured, comparable to the social cost of carbon itself. Because the costs of solvent loss to CCS operators are lower than the social costs of CCS ammonia, there is a regulatory interest to limit ammonia emissions from CCS.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n In situ formation and spatial variability of particle number concentration in a European megacity.\n \n\n\n \n Pikridas, M.; Sciare, J.; Freutel, F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; von der Weiden-Reinmueller, S., -.; Borbon, A.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Merkel, M.; Crippa, M.; Kostenidou, E.; Psichoudaki, M.; Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G., J.; Petaja, T.; Prevot, A., S., H.; Drewnick, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kulmala, M.; Beekmann, M.; and Pandis, S., N.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS, 15(17): 10219-10237. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {In situ formation and spatial variability of particle number concentration in a European megacity},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {10219-10237},\n volume = {15},\n id = {77a12d67-0cac-3ee6-9a15-55c324dec312},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000361567600029},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {Ambient particle number size distributions were measured in Paris,\nFrance, during summer (1-31 July 2009) and winter (15 January to 15\nFebruary 2010) at three fixed ground sites and using two mobile\nlaboratories and one airplane. The campaigns were part of the\nMegacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution\nand climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation\n(MEGAPOLI) project. New particle formation (NPF) was observed only\nduring summer on approximately 50% of the campaign days, assisted by\nthe low condensation sink (about 10.7 +/- 5.9 x 10(-3) s(-1)). NPF\nevents inside the Paris plume were also observed at 600m altitude\nonboard an aircraft simultaneously with regional events identified on\nthe ground. Increased particle number concentrations were measured aloft\nalso outside of the Paris plume at the same altitude, and were\nattributed to NPF. The Paris plume was identified, based on increased\nparticle number and black carbon concentration, up to 200 km away from\nthe Paris center during summer. The number concentration of particles\nwith diameters exceeding 2.5 nm measured on the surface at the Paris\ncenter was on average 6.9 +/- 8.7 x 10(4) and 12.1 +/- 8.6 x 10(4)\ncm(-3) during summer and winter, respectively, and was found to decrease\nexponentially with distance from Paris. However, further than 30 km from\nthe city center, the particle number concentration at the surface was\nsimilar during both campaigns. During summer, one suburban site in the\nNE was not significantly affected by Paris emissions due to higher\nbackground number concentrations, while the particle number\nconcentration at the second suburban site in the SW increased by a\nfactor of 3 when it was downwind of Paris.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Pikridas, M and Sciare, J and Freutel, F and Crumeyrolle, S and von der Weiden-Reinmueller, S -L. and Borbon, A and Schwarzenboeck, A and Merkel, M and Crippa, M and Kostenidou, E and Psichoudaki, M and Hildebrandt, L and Engelhart, G J and Petaja, T and Prevot, A S H and Drewnick, F and Baltensperger, U and Wiedensohler, A and Kulmala, M and Beekmann, M and Pandis, S N},\n journal = {ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS},\n number = {17}\n}
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\n Ambient particle number size distributions were measured in Paris,\nFrance, during summer (1-31 July 2009) and winter (15 January to 15\nFebruary 2010) at three fixed ground sites and using two mobile\nlaboratories and one airplane. The campaigns were part of the\nMegacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution\nand climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation\n(MEGAPOLI) project. New particle formation (NPF) was observed only\nduring summer on approximately 50% of the campaign days, assisted by\nthe low condensation sink (about 10.7 +/- 5.9 x 10(-3) s(-1)). NPF\nevents inside the Paris plume were also observed at 600m altitude\nonboard an aircraft simultaneously with regional events identified on\nthe ground. Increased particle number concentrations were measured aloft\nalso outside of the Paris plume at the same altitude, and were\nattributed to NPF. The Paris plume was identified, based on increased\nparticle number and black carbon concentration, up to 200 km away from\nthe Paris center during summer. The number concentration of particles\nwith diameters exceeding 2.5 nm measured on the surface at the Paris\ncenter was on average 6.9 +/- 8.7 x 10(4) and 12.1 +/- 8.6 x 10(4)\ncm(-3) during summer and winter, respectively, and was found to decrease\nexponentially with distance from Paris. However, further than 30 km from\nthe city center, the particle number concentration at the surface was\nsimilar during both campaigns. During summer, one suburban site in the\nNE was not significantly affected by Paris emissions due to higher\nbackground number concentrations, while the particle number\nconcentration at the second suburban site in the SW increased by a\nfactor of 3 when it was downwind of Paris.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Intermediate Volatility Organic Compound Emissions from On-Road Diesel Vehicles: Chemical Composition, Emission Factors, and Estimated Secondary Organic Aerosol Production.\n \n\n\n \n Zhao, Y., L.; Nguyen, N., T.; Presto, A., A.; Hennigan, C., J.; May, A., A.; and Robinson, A., L.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Environmental Science & Technology, 49(19): 11516-11526. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"IntermediateWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Intermediate Volatility Organic Compound Emissions from On-Road Diesel Vehicles: Chemical Composition, Emission Factors, and Estimated Secondary Organic Aerosol Production},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {11516-11526},\n volume = {49},\n websites = {%3CGo,to},\n id = {0d431053-42f0-393a-90b8-0e49aa09c6a7},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {RN1187},\n source_type = {article},\n user_context = {Journal Article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Zhao, Y L and Nguyen, N T and Presto, A A and Hennigan, C J and May, A A and Robinson, A L},\n journal = {Environmental Science & Technology},\n number = {19}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Evaluation of one-dimensional and two-dimensional volatility basis set in simulating the aging of secondary organic aerosols with smog chamber experiments.\n \n\n\n \n Zhao, B.; Wang, S., X.; Donahue, N., M.; Chuang, W.; Hildebrandt, L.; Ng, N., L.; and Hao, J., M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Environmental Science & Technology, 49: 2245-2254. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"EvaluationWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Evaluation of one-dimensional and two-dimensional volatility basis set in simulating the aging of secondary organic aerosols with smog chamber experiments},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {2245-2254},\n volume = {49},\n websites = {http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es5048914},\n id = {5e6c080f-7ddf-3a82-84ec-e704ad326218},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Zhao:est:2015a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Zhao, B and Wang, S X and Donahue, N M and Chuang, W and Hildebrandt, L and Ng, N L and Hao, J M},\n journal = {Environmental Science & Technology}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Contribution of brown carbon and lensing to the direct radiative effect of carbonaceous aerosols from biomass and biofuel burning emissions.\n \n\n\n \n Saleh, R.; Marks, M.; Heo, J.; Adams, P., J.; Donahue, N., M.; and Robinson, A., L.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 120(19): 10,285-10,296. 10 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"ContributionWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Contribution of brown carbon and lensing to the direct radiative effect of carbonaceous aerosols from biomass and biofuel burning emissions},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {10,285-10,296},\n volume = {120},\n websites = {http://http//onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015JD023697/abstract,http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JD023697},\n month = {10},\n day = {16},\n id = {f44a6a86-3a06-3943-abfd-6902fc1c2941},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Saleh:jgra:2015a},\n source_type = {Journal Article},\n short_title = {Contribution of brown carbon and lensing to the di},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Saleh, Rawad and Marks, Marguerite and Heo, Jinhyok and Adams, Peter J and Donahue, Neil M and Robinson, Allen L},\n journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres},\n number = {19}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Effects of olive tree branches burning emissions on PM2.5 concentrations.\n \n\n\n \n Papadakis, G., Z.; Megaritis, A., G.; and Pandis, S., N.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT, 112: 148-158. 7 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Effects of olive tree branches burning emissions on PM2.5 concentrations},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {148-158},\n volume = {112},\n month = {7},\n id = {d78aa6ae-928a-3cf6-93da-9cfa60369319},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000356190800015},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {An olive tree branches burning emission inventory for Greece is\ndeveloped based on recently measured emission factors and the spatial\ndistribution of olive trees. A three-dimensional chemical transport\nmodel (CTM), PMCAMx, is used to estimate the corresponding impact on\nPM2.5 concentrations during a typical winter period. Assuming that\nburning of olive tree branches takes place only during days with low\nwind speed and without precipitation, the contribution of olive tree\nbranches burning emissions on PM2.5 levels is more significant during\nthe most polluted days. Increases of hourly PM2.5 exceeding 50% and\nlocally reaching up to 150% in Crete are predicted during the most\npolluted periods. On a monthly-average basis, the corresponding\nemissions are predicted to increase PM2.5 levels up to 1.5 mu g m(-3)\n(20%) in Crete and Peloponnese, where the largest fraction of olive\ntrees is located, and by 0.4 mu g m(-3) (5%) on average over Greece. OA\nand EC levels increase by 20% and 13% respectively on average over\nGreece, and up to 70% in Crete. The magnitude of the effect is quite\nsensitive to burning practices. Assuming that burning of olive tree\nbranches takes place during all days results in a smaller effect of\nburning on PM2.5 levels (9% increase instead of 20%). These results\nsuggest that this type of agricultural waste burning is a major source\nof particulate pollution in the Mediterranean countries where this\npractice is prevalent during winter. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights\nreserved.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Papadakis, G Z and Megaritis, A G and Pandis, S N},\n journal = {ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT}\n}
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\n An olive tree branches burning emission inventory for Greece is\ndeveloped based on recently measured emission factors and the spatial\ndistribution of olive trees. A three-dimensional chemical transport\nmodel (CTM), PMCAMx, is used to estimate the corresponding impact on\nPM2.5 concentrations during a typical winter period. Assuming that\nburning of olive tree branches takes place only during days with low\nwind speed and without precipitation, the contribution of olive tree\nbranches burning emissions on PM2.5 levels is more significant during\nthe most polluted days. Increases of hourly PM2.5 exceeding 50% and\nlocally reaching up to 150% in Crete are predicted during the most\npolluted periods. On a monthly-average basis, the corresponding\nemissions are predicted to increase PM2.5 levels up to 1.5 mu g m(-3)\n(20%) in Crete and Peloponnese, where the largest fraction of olive\ntrees is located, and by 0.4 mu g m(-3) (5%) on average over Greece. OA\nand EC levels increase by 20% and 13% respectively on average over\nGreece, and up to 70% in Crete. The magnitude of the effect is quite\nsensitive to burning practices. Assuming that burning of olive tree\nbranches takes place during all days results in a smaller effect of\nburning on PM2.5 levels (9% increase instead of 20%). These results\nsuggest that this type of agricultural waste burning is a major source\nof particulate pollution in the Mediterranean countries where this\npractice is prevalent during winter. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights\nreserved.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Sea spray aerosol as a unique source of ice nucleating particles.\n \n\n\n \n Demott, P., J.; Hill, T., C., J.; McCluskey, C., S.; Prather, K., A.; Collins, D., B.; Sullivan, R., C.; Ruppel, M., J.; and Mason, R., H.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Accepted. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Sea spray aerosol as a unique source of ice nucleating particles},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n pages = {Accepted},\n id = {fbb6eb98-daac-35d4-aa32-35a3a5122bd7},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:23.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {true},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Demott2015},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Demott, Paul J. and Hill, Thomas C. J. and McCluskey, Christina S. and Prather, Kimberly A. and Collins, Douglas B. and Sullivan, Ryan C. and Ruppel, Matthew J. and Mason, R. H.},\n journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Experimental investigation of ion-ion recombination at atmospheric conditions.\n \n\n\n \n Franchin, A.; Ehrhart, S.; Leppä, J.; Nieminen, T.; Gagné, S.; Schobesberger, S.; Wimmer, D.; Duplissy, J.; Riccobono, F.; Dunne, E., M.; Rondo, L.; Downard, A.; Bianchi, F.; Kupc, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Lehtipalo, K.; Manninen, H., E.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Wagner, P., E.; Hansel, A.; Kirkby, J.; Kürten, A.; Donahue, N., M.; Makhmutov, V.; Mathot, S.; Metzger, A.; Petäjä, T.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Sipilä, M.; Stozhkov, Y.; Tomé, A.; Kerminen, V.; Carslaw, K.; Curtius, J.; Baltensperger, U.; and Kulmala, M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 15: 7203-7216. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"ExperimentalWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Experimental investigation of ion-ion recombination at atmospheric conditions},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {7203-7216},\n volume = {15},\n websites = {http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/7203/2015/},\n id = {7585eea7-5185-3d83-a7a3-fe57554a66f8},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Franchin:acp:2015a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Franchin, A and Ehrhart, S and Leppä, J and Nieminen, T and Gagné, S and Schobesberger, S and Wimmer, D and Duplissy, J and Riccobono, F and Dunne, E M and Rondo, L and Downard, A and Bianchi, F and Kupc, A and Tsagkogeorgas, G and Lehtipalo, K and Manninen, H E and Almeida, J and Amorim, A and Wagner, P E and Hansel, A and Kirkby, J and Kürten, A and Donahue, N M and Makhmutov, V and Mathot, S and Metzger, A and Petäjä, T and Schnitzhofer, R and Sipilä, M and Stozhkov, Y and Tomé, A and Kerminen, V.-M. and Carslaw, K and Curtius, J and Baltensperger, U and Kulmala, M},\n journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Constructing a Spatially Resolved Methane Emission Inventory for the Barnett Shale Region.\n \n\n\n \n Lyon, D., R.; Zavala-Araiza, D.; Alvarez, R., A.; Harriss, R.; Palacios, V.; Lan, X.; Talbot, R.; Lavoie, T.; Shepson, P.; Yacovitch, T., I.; Herndon, S., C.; Marchese, A., J.; Zimmerle, D.; Robinson, A., L.; and Hamburg, S., P.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Environmental Science & Technology, 49(13): 8147-8157. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Constructing a Spatially Resolved Methane Emission Inventory for the Barnett Shale Region},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {8147-8157},\n volume = {49},\n id = {f980c393-ca2c-3982-b945-46c452788b00},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Lyon2015},\n source_type = {Journal Article},\n short_title = {Constructing a Spatially Resolved Methane Emission},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Lyon, David R and Zavala-Araiza, Daniel and Alvarez, Ramon A and Harriss, Robert and Palacios, Virginia and Lan, Xin and Talbot, Robert and Lavoie, Tegan and Shepson, Paul and Yacovitch, Tara I and Herndon, Scott C and Marchese, Anthony J and Zimmerle, Daniel and Robinson, Allen L and Hamburg, Steven P},\n journal = {Environmental Science & Technology},\n number = {13}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Predictions of Flow Separation at the Valve-Seat for Steady-State Port-Flow Simulation.\n \n\n\n \n Fang, T.; and Singh, S.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 137(11): 111512. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Predictions of Flow Separation at the Valve-Seat for Steady-State Port-Flow Simulation},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n pages = {111512},\n volume = {137},\n id = {45b75936-2536-3c92-b05f-4487cde5d54c},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {tao_gtp2015},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Fang, T and Singh, S},\n journal = {Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power},\n number = {11}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n The role of organic condensation on ultrafine particle growth during nucleation events.\n \n\n\n \n Patoulias, D.; Fountoukis, C.; Riipinen, I.; and Pandis, S., N.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS, 15(11): 6337-6350. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {The role of organic condensation on ultrafine particle growth during nucleation events},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {6337-6350},\n volume = {15},\n id = {24de05f5-8704-399d-b868-7db094e8e722},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000356180900021},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {A new aerosol dynamics model (DMANx) has been developed that simulates\naerosol size/composition distribution and includes the condensation of\norganic vapors on nanoparticles through the implementation of the\nrecently developed volatility basis set framework. Simulations were\nperformed for Hyytiala (Finland) and Finokalia (Greece), two locations\nwith different organic sources where detailed measurements were\navailable to constrain the new model. We investigate the effect of\ncondensation of organics and chemical aging reactions of secondary\norganic aerosol (SOA) precursors on ultrafine particle growth and\nparticle number concentration during a typical springtime nucleation\nevent in both locations. This work highlights the importance of the\npathways of oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds and the\nproduction of extremely low volatility organics. At Hyytiala, organic\ncondensation dominates the growth process of new particles. The\nlow-volatility SOA contributes to particle growth during the early\ngrowth stage, but after a few hours most of the growth is due to\nsemi-volatile SOA. At Finokalia, simulations show that organics have a\ncomplementary role in new particle growth, contributing 45% to the\ntotal mass of new particles. Condensation of organics increases the\nnumber concentration of particles that can act as CCN (cloud\ncondensation nuclei) (N-100) by 13% at Finokalia and 25% at Hyytiala\nduring a typical spring day with nucleation. The sensitivity of our\nresults to the surface tension used is discussed.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Patoulias, D and Fountoukis, C and Riipinen, I and Pandis, S N},\n journal = {ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS},\n number = {11}\n}
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\n A new aerosol dynamics model (DMANx) has been developed that simulates\naerosol size/composition distribution and includes the condensation of\norganic vapors on nanoparticles through the implementation of the\nrecently developed volatility basis set framework. Simulations were\nperformed for Hyytiala (Finland) and Finokalia (Greece), two locations\nwith different organic sources where detailed measurements were\navailable to constrain the new model. We investigate the effect of\ncondensation of organics and chemical aging reactions of secondary\norganic aerosol (SOA) precursors on ultrafine particle growth and\nparticle number concentration during a typical springtime nucleation\nevent in both locations. This work highlights the importance of the\npathways of oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds and the\nproduction of extremely low volatility organics. At Hyytiala, organic\ncondensation dominates the growth process of new particles. The\nlow-volatility SOA contributes to particle growth during the early\ngrowth stage, but after a few hours most of the growth is due to\nsemi-volatile SOA. At Finokalia, simulations show that organics have a\ncomplementary role in new particle growth, contributing 45% to the\ntotal mass of new particles. Condensation of organics increases the\nnumber concentration of particles that can act as CCN (cloud\ncondensation nuclei) (N-100) by 13% at Finokalia and 25% at Hyytiala\nduring a typical spring day with nucleation. The sensitivity of our\nresults to the surface tension used is discussed.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Methane Emissions from Natural Gas Compressor Stations in the Transmission and Storage Sector: Measurements and Comparisons with the EPA Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program Protocol.\n \n\n\n \n Subramanian, R.; Williams, L., L.; Vaughn, T., L.; Zimmerle, D.; Roscioli, J., R.; Herndon, S., C.; Yacovitch, T., I.; Floerchinger, C.; Tkacik, D., S.; Mitchell, A., L.; Sullivan, M., R.; Dallmann, T., R.; and Robinson, A., L.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Environmental Science & Technology, 49(5): 3252-3261. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Methane Emissions from Natural Gas Compressor Stations in the Transmission and Storage Sector: Measurements and Comparisons with the EPA Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program Protocol},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {3252-3261},\n volume = {49},\n id = {31c4986f-bfc5-305a-90db-4b3d9c08d2cf},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Subramanian2015},\n source_type = {JOUR},\n notes = {Times Cited: 12<br/>Subramanian, R. Williams, Laurie L. Vaughn, Timothy L. Zimmerle, Daniel Roscioli, Joseph R. Herndon, Scott C. Yacovitch, Tara I. Floerchinger, Cody Tkacik, Daniel S. Mitchell, Austin L. Sullivan, Melissa R. Dallmann, Timothy R. Robinson, Allen L.<br/>Tkacik, Daniel/G-5630-2011; Robinson, Allen/M-3046-2014<br/>Robinson, Allen/0000-0002-1819-083X<br/>12<br/>1520-5851},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Subramanian, R and Williams, L L and Vaughn, T L and Zimmerle, D and Roscioli, J R and Herndon, S C and Yacovitch, T I and Floerchinger, C and Tkacik, D S and Mitchell, A L and Sullivan, M R and Dallmann, T R and Robinson, A L},\n journal = {Environmental Science & Technology},\n number = {5}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Sources and chemical characterization of organic aerosol during the summer in the eastern Mediterranean.\n \n\n\n \n Kostenidou, E.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Tsiflikiotou, M.; Vratolis, S.; Eleftheriadis, K.; and Pandis, S., N.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS, 15(19): 11355-11371. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Sources and chemical characterization of organic aerosol during the summer in the eastern Mediterranean},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {11355-11371},\n volume = {15},\n id = {bcd7baa8-e9a6-3f30-a1ec-0894a4a0fdb0},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:24.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000362971000027},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {The concentration and chemical composition of non-refractory fine\nparticulate matter (NR-PM1) and black carbon (BC) levels were measured\nduring the summer of 2012 in the suburbs of two Greek cities, Patras and\nAthens, in an effort to better understand the chemical processing of\nparticles in the high photochemical activity environment of the eastern\nMediterranean. The composition of PM1 was surprisingly similar in both\nareas, demonstrating the importance of regional sources for the\ncorresponding pollution levels. The PM1 average mass concentration was\n9-14 mu g m(-3). The contribution of sulfate was around 38 %, while\norganic aerosol (OA) contributed approximately 45% in both cases. PM1\nnitrate levels were low (2 %). The oxygen to carbon (O : C) atomic\nratio was 0.50 +/- 0.08 in Patras and 0.47 +/- 0.11 in Athens. In both\ncases PM1 was acidic.\nPositive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to the high-resolution\norganic aerosol mass spectra obtained by an Aerodyne High-Resolution\nTime-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). For Patras, five\nOA sources could be identified: 19% very oxygenated OA (V-OOA), 38%\nmoderately oxygenated OA (M-OOA), 21% biogenic oxygenated OA (b-OOA),\n7% hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA-1) associated with traffic sources and 15%\nhydrocarbon-like OA (HOA-2) related to other primary emissions\n(including cooking OA). For Athens, the corresponding source\ncontributions were: V-OOA (35 %), M-OOA (30 %), HOA-1 (18 %) and\nHOA-2 (17 %). In both cities the major component was OOA, suggesting\nthat under high photochemical conditions most of the OA in the eastern\nMediterranean is quite aged. The contribution of the primary sources\n(HOA-1 and HOA-2) was important (22% in Patras and 35% in Athens) but\nnot dominant.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Kostenidou, E and Florou, K and Kaltsonoudis, C and Tsiflikiotou, M and Vratolis, S and Eleftheriadis, K and Pandis, S N},\n journal = {ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS},\n number = {19}\n}
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\n The concentration and chemical composition of non-refractory fine\nparticulate matter (NR-PM1) and black carbon (BC) levels were measured\nduring the summer of 2012 in the suburbs of two Greek cities, Patras and\nAthens, in an effort to better understand the chemical processing of\nparticles in the high photochemical activity environment of the eastern\nMediterranean. The composition of PM1 was surprisingly similar in both\nareas, demonstrating the importance of regional sources for the\ncorresponding pollution levels. The PM1 average mass concentration was\n9-14 mu g m(-3). The contribution of sulfate was around 38 %, while\norganic aerosol (OA) contributed approximately 45% in both cases. PM1\nnitrate levels were low (2 %). The oxygen to carbon (O : C) atomic\nratio was 0.50 +/- 0.08 in Patras and 0.47 +/- 0.11 in Athens. In both\ncases PM1 was acidic.\nPositive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to the high-resolution\norganic aerosol mass spectra obtained by an Aerodyne High-Resolution\nTime-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). For Patras, five\nOA sources could be identified: 19% very oxygenated OA (V-OOA), 38%\nmoderately oxygenated OA (M-OOA), 21% biogenic oxygenated OA (b-OOA),\n7% hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA-1) associated with traffic sources and 15%\nhydrocarbon-like OA (HOA-2) related to other primary emissions\n(including cooking OA). For Athens, the corresponding source\ncontributions were: V-OOA (35 %), M-OOA (30 %), HOA-1 (18 %) and\nHOA-2 (17 %). In both cities the major component was OOA, suggesting\nthat under high photochemical conditions most of the OA in the eastern\nMediterranean is quite aged. The contribution of the primary sources\n(HOA-1 and HOA-2) was important (22% in Patras and 35% in Athens) but\nnot dominant.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Estimates of non-traditional secondary organic aerosols from aircraft SVOC and IVOC emissions using CMAQ.\n \n\n\n \n Woody, M., C.; West, J., J.; Jathar, S., H.; Robinson, A., L.; and Arunachalam, S.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 15(12): 6929-6942. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Estimates of non-traditional secondary organic aerosols from aircraft SVOC and IVOC emissions using CMAQ},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {6929-6942},\n volume = {15},\n id = {02d246c5-5234-34df-8917-af6ea7238ad0},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Woody2015},\n source_type = {Journal Article},\n short_title = {Estimates of non-traditional secondary organic aer},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Woody, M C and West, J J and Jathar, S H and Robinson, A L and Arunachalam, S},\n journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics},\n number = {12}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Thermodynamics of the formation of sulfuric acid dimers in the binary (H2SO4-H2O) and ternary (H2SO4-H2O-NH3) system.\n \n\n\n \n Kürten, A.; Münch, S.; Rondo, L.; Bianchi, F.; Duplissy, J.; Jokinen, T.; Junninen, H.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N., M.; Dunne, E., M.; Flagan, R., C.; Franchin, A.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Makhmutov, V.; Petäjä, T.; Praplan, A., P.; Riccobono, F.; Steiner, G.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Wagner, P., E.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D., R.; and Curtius, J.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 15: 10701-10721. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"ThermodynamicsWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Thermodynamics of the formation of sulfuric acid dimers in the binary (H2SO4-H2O) and ternary (H2SO4-H2O-NH3) system},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {10701-10721},\n volume = {15},\n websites = {http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/10701/2015/},\n id = {b5e88de0-b9fa-30f3-b732-2c46fb49b86f},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Kuerten:acp:2015b},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Kürten, A and Münch, S and Rondo, L and Bianchi, F and Duplissy, J and Jokinen, T and Junninen, H and Sarnela, N and Schobesberger, S and Simon, M and Sipilä, M and Almeida, J and Amorim, A and Dommen, J and Donahue, N M and Dunne, E M and Flagan, R C and Franchin, A and Kirkby, J and Kupc, A and Makhmutov, V and Petäjä, T and Praplan, A P and Riccobono, F and Steiner, G and Tomé, A and Tsagkogeorgas, G and Wagner, P E and Wimmer, D and Baltensperger, U and Kulmala, M and Worsnop, D R and Curtius, J},\n journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol from toluene: changes in chemical composition, volatility, and hygroscopicity.\n \n\n\n \n Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A., L.; Cerully, K., M.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N., M.; and Pandis, S., N.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS, 15(14): 8301-8313. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol from toluene: changes in chemical composition, volatility, and hygroscopicity},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {8301-8313},\n volume = {15},\n id = {f91aebc1-69b4-341f-830e-7fa9c2735bb0},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000358799000030},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial\nformation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood.\nExperiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber\nto form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photo-oxidation of\ntoluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in\nthe presence of NOx under different oxidizing conditions. The effects of\nthe oxidizing condition on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield,\nvolatility, and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the\nhydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon\noxidation state (OSc), and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally\nincreased during photo-oxidation, and the final OA OSc ranged from -0.29\nto 0.16 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in\nthese different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30,\ndemonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions\ncan have a significantly different saturation concentration. There was\nno clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this\nrelatively hygroscopic SOA.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Hildebrandt Ruiz, L and Paciga, A L and Cerully, K M and Nenes, A and Donahue, N M and Pandis, S N},\n journal = {ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS},\n number = {14}\n}
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\n Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial\nformation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood.\nExperiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber\nto form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photo-oxidation of\ntoluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in\nthe presence of NOx under different oxidizing conditions. The effects of\nthe oxidizing condition on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield,\nvolatility, and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the\nhydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon\noxidation state (OSc), and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally\nincreased during photo-oxidation, and the final OA OSc ranged from -0.29\nto 0.16 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in\nthese different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30,\ndemonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions\ncan have a significantly different saturation concentration. There was\nno clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this\nrelatively hygroscopic SOA.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Elemental Ratio Measurements of Organic Compounds using Aerosol Mass Spectrometry: Characterization, Improved Calibration, and Implications.\n \n\n\n \n Canagaratna, M., R.; Jimenez, J., L.; Kroll, J.; Chen, Q.; Kessler, S.; Massoli, P.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Fortner, E.; Williams, L.; Wilson, K.; Surratt, J.; Donahue, N., M.; Jayne, J., T.; and Worsnop, D., R.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 15: 253-272. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"ElementalWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Elemental Ratio Measurements of Organic Compounds using Aerosol Mass Spectrometry: Characterization, Improved Calibration, and Implications},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {253-272},\n volume = {15},\n websites = {http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/253/2015/},\n id = {729bc949-a465-36a3-be9b-223ef94e84c5},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Canagaratna:acp:2015a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Canagaratna, M R and Jimenez, J L and Kroll, J and Chen, Q and Kessler, S and Massoli, P and Hildebrandt Ruiz, L and Fortner, E and Williams, L and Wilson, K and Surratt, J and Donahue, N M and Jayne, J T and Worsnop, D R},\n journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Semi-empirical process-based models for ammonia emissions from beef, swine, and poultry operations in the United States.\n \n\n\n \n McQuilling, A., M.; and Adams, P., J.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Environment, 120: 127-136. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Semi-empirical process-based models for ammonia emissions from beef, swine, and poultry operations in the United States},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {127-136},\n volume = {120},\n id = {b2965f28-c646-337a-9516-3c00b2ab334e},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {McQuilling2015},\n source_type = {Journal Article},\n short_title = {Semi-empirical process-based models for ammonia em},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {McQuilling, Alyssa M and Adams, Peter J},\n journal = {Atmospheric Environment}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Evaluation of the global aerosol microphysical ModelE2-TOMAS model against satellite and ground-based observations.\n \n\n\n \n Lee, Y., H.; Adams, P., J.; and Shindell, D., T.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Geoscientific Model Development, 8(3): 631-667. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Evaluation of the global aerosol microphysical ModelE2-TOMAS model against satellite and ground-based observations},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {631-667},\n volume = {8},\n id = {ba64b50e-f7b4-3b9a-bc38-6feb434da92d},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Lee2015},\n source_type = {Journal Article},\n notes = {Times Cited: 0},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {The TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics model has been integrated into the state-of-the-art general circulation model, GISS ModelE2. This paper provides a detailed description of the ModelE2-TOMAS model and evaluates the model against various observations including aerosol precursor gas concentrations, aerosol mass and number concentrations, and aerosol optical depths. Additionally, global budgets in ModelE2-TOMAS are compared with those of other global aerosol models, and the ModelE2-TOMAS model is compared to the default aerosol model in ModelE2, which is a one-moment aerosol (OMA) model (i.e. no aerosol microphysics). Overall, the ModelE2-TOMAS predictions are within the range of other global aerosol model predictions, and the model has a reasonable agreement (mostly within a factor of 2) with observations of sulfur species and other aerosol components as well as aerosol optical depth. However, ModelE2-TOMAS (as well as ModelE2-OMA) cannot capture the observed vertical distribution of sulfur dioxide over the Pacific Ocean, possibly due to overly strong convective transport and overpredicted precipitation. The ModelE2-TOMAS model simulates observed aerosol number concentrations and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations roughly within a factor of 2. Anthropogenic aerosol burdens in ModelE2-OMA differ from ModelE2-TOMAS by a few percent to a factor of 2 regionally, mainly due to differences in aerosol processes including deposition, cloud processing, and emission parameterizations. We observed larger differences for naturally emitted aerosols such as sea salt and mineral dust, as those emission rates are quite different due to different upper size cutoff assumptions.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Lee, Y H and Adams, P J and Shindell, D T},\n journal = {Geoscientific Model Development},\n number = {3}\n}
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\n The TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics model has been integrated into the state-of-the-art general circulation model, GISS ModelE2. This paper provides a detailed description of the ModelE2-TOMAS model and evaluates the model against various observations including aerosol precursor gas concentrations, aerosol mass and number concentrations, and aerosol optical depths. Additionally, global budgets in ModelE2-TOMAS are compared with those of other global aerosol models, and the ModelE2-TOMAS model is compared to the default aerosol model in ModelE2, which is a one-moment aerosol (OMA) model (i.e. no aerosol microphysics). Overall, the ModelE2-TOMAS predictions are within the range of other global aerosol model predictions, and the model has a reasonable agreement (mostly within a factor of 2) with observations of sulfur species and other aerosol components as well as aerosol optical depth. However, ModelE2-TOMAS (as well as ModelE2-OMA) cannot capture the observed vertical distribution of sulfur dioxide over the Pacific Ocean, possibly due to overly strong convective transport and overpredicted precipitation. The ModelE2-TOMAS model simulates observed aerosol number concentrations and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations roughly within a factor of 2. Anthropogenic aerosol burdens in ModelE2-OMA differ from ModelE2-TOMAS by a few percent to a factor of 2 regionally, mainly due to differences in aerosol processes including deposition, cloud processing, and emission parameterizations. We observed larger differences for naturally emitted aerosols such as sea salt and mineral dust, as those emission rates are quite different due to different upper size cutoff assumptions.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Effect of ions on sulfuric acid-water binary particle formation II: Experimental data and comparison with QC-normalized classical nucleation theory.\n \n\n\n \n Duplissy, J.; Merikanto, J.; Franchin, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Kangasluoma, J.; Wimmer, D.; Vuollekoski, H.; Schobesberger, S.; Lehtipalo, K.; Flagan, R.; Brus, D.; Donahue, N.; Vehkämäki, H.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Barmet, P.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Dunne, E.; Guida, R.; Henschel, H.; Junninen, H.; Kirkby, J.; Kürten, A.; Kupc, A.; Määttänen, A.; Makhmutov, V.; Mathot, S.; Nieminen, T.; Onnela, A.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rondo, L.; Steiner, G.; Tome, A.; Walther, H.; Baltensperger, U.; Carslaw, K.; Dommen, J.; Hansel, A.; Petäjä, T.; Sipilä, M.; Stratmann, F.; Vrtala, A.; Wagner, P.; Worsnop, D.; Curtius, J.; and Kulmala, M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, in press: n/a-n/a. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"EffectWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Effect of ions on sulfuric acid-water binary particle formation II: Experimental data and comparison with QC-normalized classical nucleation theory},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {n/a-n/a},\n volume = {in press},\n websites = {http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015JD023539},\n id = {cef08634-8912-3dfe-9969-f3922b0ecb07},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Duplissy:jgra:2015a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Duplissy, J and Merikanto, J and Franchin, A and Tsagkogeorgas, G and Kangasluoma, J and Wimmer, D and Vuollekoski, H. and Schobesberger, S and Lehtipalo, K. and Flagan, R.C. and Brus, D and Donahue, N.M. and Vehkämäki, H and Almeida, J and Amorim, A and Barmet, P and Bianchi, F. and Breitenlechner, M and Dunne, E.M. and Guida, R and Henschel, H and Junninen, H and Kirkby, J and Kürten, A. and Kupc, A and Määttänen, A and Makhmutov, V and Mathot, S and Nieminen, T and Onnela, A and Praplan, A.P. and Riccobono, F and Rondo, L and Steiner, G and Tome, A and Walther, H and Baltensperger, U and Carslaw, K.S. and Dommen, J and Hansel, A and Petäjä, T. and Sipilä, M and Stratmann, F and Vrtala, A and Wagner, P.E. and Worsnop, D.R. and Curtius, J and Kulmala, M},\n journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Integrating laboratory and field data to quantify the immersion freezing ice nucleation activity of mineral dust particles.\n \n\n\n \n DeMott, P., J.; Prenni, A., J.; McMeeking, G., R.; Sullivan, R., C.; Petters, M., D.; Tobo, Y.; Niemand, M.; Möhler, O.; Snider, J., R.; Wang, Z.; and Kreidenweis, S., M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 15(1): 393-409. 1 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"IntegratingWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Integrating laboratory and field data to quantify the immersion freezing ice nucleation activity of mineral dust particles},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {393-409},\n volume = {15},\n websites = {http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/393/2015/acp-15-393-2015.html,http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/393/2015/},\n month = {1},\n publisher = {Copernicus GmbH},\n day = {13},\n id = {de2cb496-43f2-340f-ab3d-0f673e00fa3e},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n accessed = {2015-01-13},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {true},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {DeMott2015},\n language = {English},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {Data from both laboratory studies and atmospheric measurements are used to develop an empirical parameterization for the immersion freezing activity of natural mineral dust particles. Measurements made with the Colorado State University (CSU) continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) when processing mineral dust aerosols at a nominal 105% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw) are taken as a measure of the immersion freezing nucleation activity of particles. Ice active frozen fractions vs. temperature for dusts representative of Saharan and Asian desert sources were consistent with similar measurements in atmospheric dust plumes for a limited set of comparisons available. The parameterization developed follows the form of one suggested previously for atmospheric particles of non-specific composition in quantifying ice nucleating particle concentrations as functions of temperature and the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.5 μm diameter. Such an approach does not explicitly account for surface area and time dependencies for ice nucleation, but sufficiently encapsulates the activation properties for potential use in regional and global modeling simulations, and possible application in developing remote sensing retrievals for ice nucleating particles. A calibration factor is introduced to account for the apparent underestimate (by approximately 3, on average) of the immersion freezing fraction of mineral dust particles for CSU CFDC data processed at an RHw of 105% vs. maximum fractions active at higher RHw. Instrumental factors that affect activation behavior vs. RHw in CFDC instruments remain to be fully explored in future studies. Nevertheless, the use of this calibration factor is supported by comparison to ice activation data obtained for the same aerosols from Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics of the Atmosphere (AIDA) expansion chamber cloud parcel experiments. Further comparison of the new parameterization, including calibration correction, to predictions of the immersion freezing surface active site density parameterization for mineral dust particles, developed separately from AIDA experimental data alone, shows excellent agreement for data collected in a descent through a Saharan aerosol layer. These studies support the utility of laboratory measurements to obtain atmospherically relevant data on the ice nucleation properties of dust and other particle types, and suggest the suitability of considering all mineral dust as a single type of ice nucleating particle as a useful first-order approximation in numerical modeling investigations.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {DeMott, P. J. and Prenni, A. J. and McMeeking, G. R. and Sullivan, R. C. and Petters, M. D. and Tobo, Y. and Niemand, M. and Möhler, O. and Snider, J. R. and Wang, Z. and Kreidenweis, S. M.},\n journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics},\n number = {1}\n}
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\n Data from both laboratory studies and atmospheric measurements are used to develop an empirical parameterization for the immersion freezing activity of natural mineral dust particles. Measurements made with the Colorado State University (CSU) continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) when processing mineral dust aerosols at a nominal 105% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw) are taken as a measure of the immersion freezing nucleation activity of particles. Ice active frozen fractions vs. temperature for dusts representative of Saharan and Asian desert sources were consistent with similar measurements in atmospheric dust plumes for a limited set of comparisons available. The parameterization developed follows the form of one suggested previously for atmospheric particles of non-specific composition in quantifying ice nucleating particle concentrations as functions of temperature and the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.5 μm diameter. Such an approach does not explicitly account for surface area and time dependencies for ice nucleation, but sufficiently encapsulates the activation properties for potential use in regional and global modeling simulations, and possible application in developing remote sensing retrievals for ice nucleating particles. A calibration factor is introduced to account for the apparent underestimate (by approximately 3, on average) of the immersion freezing fraction of mineral dust particles for CSU CFDC data processed at an RHw of 105% vs. maximum fractions active at higher RHw. Instrumental factors that affect activation behavior vs. RHw in CFDC instruments remain to be fully explored in future studies. Nevertheless, the use of this calibration factor is supported by comparison to ice activation data obtained for the same aerosols from Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics of the Atmosphere (AIDA) expansion chamber cloud parcel experiments. Further comparison of the new parameterization, including calibration correction, to predictions of the immersion freezing surface active site density parameterization for mineral dust particles, developed separately from AIDA experimental data alone, shows excellent agreement for data collected in a descent through a Saharan aerosol layer. These studies support the utility of laboratory measurements to obtain atmospherically relevant data on the ice nucleation properties of dust and other particle types, and suggest the suitability of considering all mineral dust as a single type of ice nucleating particle as a useful first-order approximation in numerical modeling investigations.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Saturation vapor pressures and transition enthalpies of low-volatility organic molecules of atmospheric relevance: from dicarboxylic acids to complex mixtures.\n \n\n\n \n Bilde, M.; Barsanti, K.; Booth, A.; Cappa, C.; Donahue, N., M.; McFiggans, G.; Krieger, U.; Marcolli, C.; Topping, D.; Ziemann, P.; Barley, M.; Clegg, S.; Dennis-Smither, B.; Emanuelsson, E.; Hallquist, M.; Hallquist, Å.; Khlystov, A.; Kulmala, M.; Mogensen, D.; Percival, C.; Pope, F.; Reid, J.; Rosenoern, T.; da Silva, M.; Salo, K.; Soonsin, V.; Yli-Juuti, T.; Prisle, N.; Pagels, J.; Rarey, J.; Zardini, A.; and Riipinen, I.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Chemical Reviews, 115: 4115-4156. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"SaturationWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Saturation vapor pressures and transition enthalpies of low-volatility organic molecules of atmospheric relevance: from dicarboxylic acids to complex mixtures},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {4115-4156},\n volume = {115},\n websites = {http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/cr5005502},\n id = {f819027c-3005-394a-b574-1aa7d5ec5fa5},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:25.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Bilde:cr:2015a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Bilde, Merete and Barsanti, Kelley and Booth, Alastair and Cappa, Christopher and Donahue, Neil M and McFiggans, Gordon and Krieger, Ulrich and Marcolli, Claudia and Topping, David and Ziemann, Paul and Barley, Mark and Clegg, Simon and Dennis-Smither, Benjamin and Emanuelsson, Eva and Hallquist, Mattias and Hallquist, Åsa and Khlystov, Andrey and Kulmala, Markku and Mogensen, Ditte and Percival, Carl and Pope, Francis and Reid, Jonathan and Rosenoern, Thomas and da Silva, Manuel and Salo, Kent and Soonsin, Vacharaporn and Yli-Juuti, Taina and Prisle, Nønne and Pagels, Joakim and Rarey, Juergen and Zardini, Alessandro and Riipinen, Ilona},\n journal = {Chemical Reviews}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Probing the evaporation dynamics of mixed SOA/squalane particles using size-resolved composition and single-particle measurements.\n \n\n\n \n Robinson, E., S.; Saleh, R.; and Donahue, N., M.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Environmental Science & Technology, 49: 9724-9732. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"ProbingWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Probing the evaporation dynamics of mixed SOA/squalane particles using size-resolved composition and single-particle measurements},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {9724-9732},\n volume = {49},\n websites = {http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.est.5b01692},\n id = {eb4060f3-5ca2-3763-850f-34f769e4a63d},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:26.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ERobinson:est:2015a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Robinson, E S and Saleh, R and Donahue, N M},\n journal = {Environmental Science & Technology}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Effects of a changing climate on summertime fine particulate matter levels in the eastern US.\n \n\n\n \n Day, M., C.; and Pandis, S., N.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES, 120(11): 5706-5720. 6 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n  \n \n abstract \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Effects of a changing climate on summertime fine particulate matter levels in the eastern US},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {5706-5720},\n volume = {120},\n month = {6},\n id = {bafcb285-19f0-34dd-abb7-2deaf8baf7bc},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:26.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {ISI:000356975700025},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n abstract = {The chemical transport model PMCAMx is used to examine the effect of\nclimate change on fine (under 2.5 mu ms) particulate matter (PM2.5)\nduring the summer in the eastern United States. Meteorology from 10years\nin the 1990s (present) and 10years in the 2050s (future) based on the\nIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change A2 scenario is used.\nAnthropogenic pollutant emissions are assumed to remain constant, while\nbiogenic emissions are climate sensitive and, depending on species,\nincrease between 15 and 27% on average. The predicted changes of PM2.5\nare modest (increases of less than 10% on average across the domain)\nand quite variable in space, ranging from +13% in the Plains to -7% in\nthe Northeast. Variability is driven concurrently by changes in\ntemperature, wind speed, rainfall, and relative humidity, with no single\ndominant meteorological factor. Sulfate and organic aerosol are\nresponsible for most of the PM2.5 change. The improved treatment of\norganic aerosol using the volatility basis set does not increase\nsignificantly its sensitivity to climate change compared to traditional\ntreatments that neglect the volatility of primary particles and do not\nsimulate the chemical aging processes. Future organic aerosol is\npredicted to be more oxidized due to increases of its secondary biogenic\nand anthropogenic components. These results suggest that the effects of\nplanned and expected emission anthropogenic emission controls will be\nmore important than those of climate change for PM2.5 concentrations in\n2050. Maximum daily 8h average ozone increases by 5% on average are\npredicted, with a marked increase in the Northeast, Southeast, and\nMidwest.},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Day, Melissa C and Pandis, Spyros N},\n journal = {JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES},\n number = {11}\n}
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\n The chemical transport model PMCAMx is used to examine the effect of\nclimate change on fine (under 2.5 mu ms) particulate matter (PM2.5)\nduring the summer in the eastern United States. Meteorology from 10years\nin the 1990s (present) and 10years in the 2050s (future) based on the\nIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change A2 scenario is used.\nAnthropogenic pollutant emissions are assumed to remain constant, while\nbiogenic emissions are climate sensitive and, depending on species,\nincrease between 15 and 27% on average. The predicted changes of PM2.5\nare modest (increases of less than 10% on average across the domain)\nand quite variable in space, ranging from +13% in the Plains to -7% in\nthe Northeast. Variability is driven concurrently by changes in\ntemperature, wind speed, rainfall, and relative humidity, with no single\ndominant meteorological factor. Sulfate and organic aerosol are\nresponsible for most of the PM2.5 change. The improved treatment of\norganic aerosol using the volatility basis set does not increase\nsignificantly its sensitivity to climate change compared to traditional\ntreatments that neglect the volatility of primary particles and do not\nsimulate the chemical aging processes. Future organic aerosol is\npredicted to be more oxidized due to increases of its secondary biogenic\nand anthropogenic components. These results suggest that the effects of\nplanned and expected emission anthropogenic emission controls will be\nmore important than those of climate change for PM2.5 concentrations in\n2050. Maximum daily 8h average ozone increases by 5% on average are\npredicted, with a marked increase in the Northeast, Southeast, and\nMidwest.\n
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Photochemical aging of secondary organic aerosols generated from the photooxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the gas-phase.\n \n\n\n \n Riva, M.; Robinson, E., S.; Perraudin, E.; Donahue, N., M.; and Villenave, E.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Environmental Science & Technology, 49: 5407-5416. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"PhotochemicalWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Photochemical aging of secondary organic aerosols generated from the photooxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the gas-phase},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n keywords = {Ellis},\n pages = {5407-5416},\n volume = {49},\n websites = {http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.est.5b00442},\n id = {d826c2aa-bcb2-332c-b590-e4c72e8b5546},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:26.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Riva:est:2015a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Riva, M and Robinson, E S and Perraudin, E and Donahue, N M and Villenave, E},\n journal = {Environmental Science & Technology}\n}
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\n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n Elemental composition and clustering of α-pinene oxidation products for different oxidation conditions.\n \n\n\n \n Praplan, A., P.; Schobesberger, S.; Bianchi, F.; Rissanen, M., P.; Ehn, M.; Jokinen, T.; Junninen, H.; Adamov, A.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Duplissy, J.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Heinritzi, M.; Kangasluoma, J.; Kirkby, J.; Krapf, M.; Kürten, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Riccobono, F.; Rondo, L.; Sarnela, N.; Simon, M.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Winkler, P., M.; Williamson, C.; Ye, P.; Curtius, J.; Baltensperger, U.; Donahue, N., M.; Kulmala, M.; and Worsnop, D., R.\n \n\n\n \n\n\n\n Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 15: 4145-4159. 2015.\n \n\n\n\n
\n\n\n \n \n \n \"ElementalWebsite\n  \n \n\n \n\n bibtex \n \n \n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n\n
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@article{\n title = {Elemental composition and clustering of α-pinene oxidation products for different oxidation conditions},\n type = {article},\n year = {2015},\n identifiers = {[object Object]},\n pages = {4145-4159},\n volume = {15},\n websites = {http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/4145/2015/},\n id = {fc80f374-b3e7-3639-9350-fd7fc89fffdb},\n created = {2016-12-06T23:23:26.000Z},\n file_attached = {false},\n profile_id = {363623ef-1990-38f1-b354-f5cdaa6548b2},\n group_id = {d70c81c8-7b32-33ca-a271-e42fa5fcc476},\n last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:22:25.304Z},\n read = {false},\n starred = {false},\n authored = {false},\n confirmed = {true},\n hidden = {false},\n citation_key = {Praplan:acp:2015a},\n source_type = {article},\n private_publication = {false},\n bibtype = {article},\n author = {Praplan, A P and Schobesber