Effects of syllable-initial voicing and speaking rate on the temporal characteristics of monosyllabic words. Allen, J S. and Miller, J. L The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 106(4):2031--2039, 1999. bibtex: allen_effects_1999
Effects of syllable-initial voicing and speaking rate on the temporal characteristics of monosyllabic words [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Two speech production experiments tested the validity of the traditional method of creating voice-onset-time (VOT) continua for perceptual studies in which the systematic increase in VOT across the continuum is accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the duration of the following vowel. In experiment 1, segmental durations were measured for matched monosyllabic words beginning with either a voiced stop (e.g., big, duck, gap) or a voiceless stop (e.g., pig, tuck, cap). Results from four talkers showed that the change from voiced to voiceless stop produced not only an increase in VOT, but also a decrease in vowel duration. However, the decrease in vowel duration was consistently less than the increase in VOT. In experiment 2, results from four new talkers replicated these findings at two rates of speech, as well as highlighted the contrasting temporal effects on vowel duration of an increase in VOT due to a change in syllable-initial voicing versus a change in speaking rate. It was concluded that the traditional method of creating VOT continua for perceptual experiments, although not perfect, approximates natural speech by capturing the basic trade-off between VOT and vowel duration in syllable-initial voiced versus voiceless stop consonants.
@article{allen_effects_1999,
	Abstract = {Two speech production experiments tested the validity of the traditional method of creating voice-onset-time (VOT) continua for perceptual studies in which the systematic increase in VOT across the continuum is accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the duration of the following vowel. In experiment 1, segmental durations were measured for matched monosyllabic words beginning with either a voiced stop (e.g., big, duck, gap) or a voiceless stop (e.g., pig, tuck, cap). Results from four talkers showed that the change from voiced to voiceless stop produced not only an increase in VOT, but also a decrease in vowel duration. However, the decrease in vowel duration was consistently less than the increase in VOT. In experiment 2, results from four new talkers replicated these findings at two rates of speech, as well as highlighted the contrasting temporal effects on vowel duration of an increase in VOT due to a change in syllable-initial voicing versus a change in speaking rate. It was concluded that the traditional method of creating VOT continua for perceptual experiments, although not perfect, approximates natural speech by capturing the basic trade-off between VOT and vowel duration in syllable-initial voiced versus voiceless stop consonants.},
	Author = {Allen, J Sean and Miller, Joanne L},
	Doi = {10.1121/1.427949},
	Issn = {00014966},
	Journal = {The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America},
	Keywords = {acoustic phonetics, consonants, duration, phonetics, prosody, segmental, speech rate, temporal factors, voicing},
	Note = {bibtex: allen\_effects\_1999},
	Number = {4},
	Pages = {2031--2039},
	Pmid = {10530026},
	Title = {Effects of syllable-initial voicing and speaking rate on the temporal characteristics of monosyllabic words},
	Url = {http://scitation.aip.org/content/asa/journal/jasa/106/4/10.1121/1.427949},
	Volume = {106},
	Year = {1999},
	Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://scitation.aip.org/content/asa/journal/jasa/106/4/10.1121/1.427949},
	Bdsk-Url-2 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.427949}}
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