Workload and the use of automatic speech recognition: The effects of time and resource demands. Baber, C; Mellor, B; Graham, R; Noyes, J M; and Tunley, C Speech Communication, 20(1-2):37-54.
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Previous research has indicated that workload can have an adverse effect on the use of speech recognition systems. In this paper, the relationship between workload and speech is discussed, and two studies are reported. In the first study, time-stress is considered. In the second study, dual-task performance is considered. Both studies show workload to significantly reduce recognition accuracy and user performance. The nature of the impairment is shown to differ between individuals and types of workload. Furthermore, it appears that workload affects the selection of words to use, the articulation of the words and the relationship between speaking to ASR and performing other tasks. It is proposed that speaking to ASR is, in itself, demanding and that as workload increases so the ability to perform the task within the limits required by ASR suffers.
@article{baber_workload_1996,
	Author = {Baber, C and Mellor, B and Graham, R and Noyes, J M and Tunley, C},
	Date = {1996},
	Date-Modified = {2017-04-19 08:04:06 +0000},
	Doi = {10.1016/S0167-6393(96)00043-X},
	Journal = {Speech Communication},
	Keywords = {accessibility, emotions, speaking styles, speech technology, stress},
	Number = {1-2},
	Pages = {37-54},
	Title = {Workload and the use of automatic speech recognition: The effects of time and resource demands},
	Volume = {20},
	Abstract = {Previous research has indicated that workload can have an adverse effect on the use of speech recognition systems. In this paper, the relationship between workload and speech is discussed, and two studies are reported. In the first study, time-stress is considered. In the second study, dual-task performance is considered. Both studies show workload to significantly reduce recognition accuracy and user performance. The nature of the impairment is shown to differ between individuals and types of workload. Furthermore, it appears that workload affects the selection of words to use, the articulation of the words and the relationship between speaking to ASR and performing other tasks. It is proposed that speaking to ASR is, in itself, demanding and that as workload increases so the ability to perform the task within the limits required by ASR suffers.},
	Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0167-6393(96)00043-X}}
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