Field trials of the Italian Arise train timetable system. Baggia, P.; Castagneri, G.; and Danieli, M. Speech Communication, 31(4):355-367, August.
Field trials of the Italian Arise train timetable system [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
This paper reports results from two field trials of the CSELT Arise spoken dialogue system in the Italian railway call centre FS-Informa. The system provides voice-driven access to railway timetable for the major Italian and some European cities. On the basis of the initial experiences we have been able to integrate the automatic system in the architecture of a typical railway call centre, where preferable timetable information is interchanged with a caller via a spoken dialogue system, and where a human operator is involved only for answering more complex user requests. We argue that the results we present are relevant from different points of view. They allowed us to test the impact of the automatic system on the working routines of the human operators, and the reactions of real callers who are traditionally served by human operators.
@article{baggia_field_2000,
	Author = {Baggia, Paolo and Castagneri, Giuseppe and Danieli, Morena},
	Date = {2000},
	Date-Modified = {2017-04-19 08:04:06 +0000},
	Doi = {10.1016/S0167-6393(99)00068-0},
	Issn = {01676393},
	Journal = {Speech Communication},
	Keywords = {assessment, dialogue systems, speech technology},
	Month = aug,
	Number = {4},
	Pages = {355-367},
	Title = {Field trials of the Italian Arise train timetable system},
	Url = {http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167639399000680},
	Volume = {31},
	Abstract = {This paper reports results from two field trials of the CSELT Arise spoken dialogue system in the Italian railway call centre FS-Informa. The system provides voice-driven access to railway timetable for the major Italian and some European cities. On the basis of the initial experiences we have been able to integrate the automatic system in the architecture of a typical railway call centre, where preferable timetable information is interchanged with a caller via a spoken dialogue system, and where a human operator is involved only for answering more complex user requests. We argue that the results we present are relevant from different points of view. They allowed us to test the impact of the automatic system on the working routines of the human operators, and the reactions of real callers who are traditionally served by human operators.},
	Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167639399000680},
	Bdsk-Url-2 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0167-6393(99)00068-0}}
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