Virtual reality in preoperative imaging in maxillofacial surgery: implementation of “the next level”?. Bartella, A., Kamal, M., Scholl, I., Schiffer, S., Steegmann, J., Ketelsen, D., Hölzle, F., & Lethaus, B. British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 57(7):644–648, 2019.
Virtual reality in preoperative imaging in maxillofacial surgery: implementation of “the next level”? [link]Paper  Virtual reality in preoperative imaging in maxillofacial surgery: implementation of “the next level”? [link]Bjoms  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Not only are current imaging techniques - cone-beam computed tomography (CT), CT, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - becoming more precise in capturing data, but the illustration and interpretation of the acquired images is no longer limited to conventional display screens or projectors. The so-called “virtual reality” (VR) glasses have the potential to engage the viewer in a 3-dimensional space, and ultimately to enable evaluation of the reconstructed anatomical structures from a new perspective. For the first time in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS), a 3-dimensional imaging dataset (cone-beam CT, CT, and MRI) can be evaluated by using VR glasses. A medical student, an OMFS resident, and an OMFS consultant rated the preoperative usability of VR glasses to improve the operative understanding of three cases: a deeply impacted wisdom tooth, a fracture of the lower jaw, and an oncological resection. VR glasses seem to help to simplify operations and give the surgeon a good preoperative overview of the intraoperative findings, particularly in the evaluation of impacted teeth and hard tissue structures. In addition, VR glasses seem to be a promising innovation to help in the training of surgical residents and to teach students. However, the more experienced the surgeon, the smaller is the additional value of VR glasses. Preoperative examination using VR glasses can aid better understanding and planning of the surgical site in the future, and is an innovative piece of advanced technology for displaying CT, cone-beam CT, and MRI anatomical data.
@article{ Bartella:EtAl:BJOMS2019:VR-in-preop-Img,
  title        = "Virtual reality in preoperative imaging in maxillofacial surgery: implementation of “the next level”?",
  author       = "A.K. Bartella and M. Kamal and I. Scholl and S. Schiffer and
                  J. Steegmann and D. Ketelsen and F. Hölzle and B. Lethaus",
  journal      = "British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery",
  volume       = "57",
  number       = "7",
  pages        = "644--648",
  year         = "2019",
  issn         = "0266-4356",
  doi          = "https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjoms.2019.02.014",
  url          = "http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0266435619302104",
  url_BJOMS    = {https://www.bjoms.com/article/S0266-4356(19)30210-4/fulltext},
  keywords     = "VR, Virtual Reality, Preoperative Planning, CT, MRI",
  abstract     = "Not only are current imaging techniques - cone-beam
                  computed tomography (CT), CT, and magnetic resonance
                  imaging (MRI) - becoming more precise in capturing
                  data, but the illustration and interpretation of the
                  acquired images is no longer limited to conventional
                  display screens or projectors. The so-called
                  “virtual reality” (VR) glasses have the potential to
                  engage the viewer in a 3-dimensional space, and
                  ultimately to enable evaluation of the reconstructed
                  anatomical structures from a new perspective. For
                  the first time in the field of oral and
                  maxillofacial surgery (OMFS), a 3-dimensional
                  imaging dataset (cone-beam CT, CT, and MRI) can be
                  evaluated by using VR glasses. A medical student, an
                  OMFS resident, and an OMFS consultant rated the
                  preoperative usability of VR glasses to improve the
                  operative understanding of three cases: a deeply
                  impacted wisdom tooth, a fracture of the lower jaw,
                  and an oncological resection. VR glasses seem to
                  help to simplify operations and give the surgeon a
                  good preoperative overview of the intraoperative
                  findings, particularly in the evaluation of impacted
                  teeth and hard tissue structures. In addition, VR
                  glasses seem to be a promising innovation to help in
                  the training of surgical residents and to teach
                  students. However, the more experienced the surgeon,
                  the smaller is the additional value of VR
                  glasses. Preoperative examination using VR glasses
                  can aid better understanding and planning of the
                  surgical site in the future, and is an innovative
                  piece of advanced technology for displaying CT,
                  cone-beam CT, and MRI anatomical data.",
}

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