Temporal dimensions of consonant and vowel production: An acoustic and CT scan analysis of aphasic speech. Baum, S. R; Blumstein, S. E; Naeser, M A; and Palumbo, C L Brain and Language, 39(1):33-56.
doi  abstract   bibtex   
This study explored a number of temporal (durational) parameters of consonant and vowel production in order to determine whether the speech production impairments of aphasics are the result of the same or different underlying mechanisms and in particular whether they implicate deficits that are primarily phonetic or phonological in nature. Detailed analyses of CT scan lesion data were also conducted to explore whether more specific neuroanatomical correlations could be made with speech production deficits. A series of acoustic analyses were conducted including voice-onset time, intrinsic and contrastive fricative duration, and intrinsic and contrastive vowel duration as produced by Broca's aphasics with anterior lesions (A patients), nonfluent aphasics with anterior and posterior lesions (AP patients), and fluent aphasics with posterior lesions (P patients). The constellation of impairments for the anterior aphasics including both the A and AP patients suggests that their disorder primarily reflects an inability to implement particular types of articulatory gestures or articulatory parameters rather than an inability to implement particular phonetic features. They display impairments in the implementation of laryngeal gestures for both consonant and vowel production. These patterns seem to relate to particular anatomical sites involving Broca's area, the anterior limb of the internal capsule, and the lowest motor cortex areas for larynx and tongue. The posterior patients also show evidence of subtle phonetic impairments suggesting that the neural instantiation of speech may require more extensive involvement, including the perisylvian area, than previously suggested.
@article{baum_temporal_1990,
	Author = {Baum, Shari R and Blumstein, Sheila E and Naeser, M A and Palumbo, C L},
	Date = {1990},
	Date-Modified = {2017-04-19 08:04:06 +0000},
	Doi = {10.1016/0093-934X(90)90003-Y},
	Issn = {0093934X},
	Journal = {Brain and Language},
	Keywords = {aphasia, clinical, clinical phonetics, duration, neurolinguistics, phonetics, prosody, temporal factors},
	Number = {1},
	Pages = {33-56},
	Pmid = {2207620},
	Title = {Temporal dimensions of consonant and vowel production: An acoustic and CT scan analysis of aphasic speech},
	Volume = {39},
	Abstract = {This study explored a number of temporal (durational) parameters of consonant and vowel production in order to determine whether the speech production impairments of aphasics are the result of the same or different underlying mechanisms and in particular whether they implicate deficits that are primarily phonetic or phonological in nature. Detailed analyses of CT scan lesion data were also conducted to explore whether more specific neuroanatomical correlations could be made with speech production deficits. A series of acoustic analyses were conducted including voice-onset time, intrinsic and contrastive fricative duration, and intrinsic and contrastive vowel duration as produced by Broca's aphasics with anterior lesions (A patients), nonfluent aphasics with anterior and posterior lesions (AP patients), and fluent aphasics with posterior lesions (P patients). The constellation of impairments for the anterior aphasics including both the A and AP patients suggests that their disorder primarily reflects an inability to implement particular types of articulatory gestures or articulatory parameters rather than an inability to implement particular phonetic features. They display impairments in the implementation of laryngeal gestures for both consonant and vowel production. These patterns seem to relate to particular anatomical sites involving Broca's area, the anterior limb of the internal capsule, and the lowest motor cortex areas for larynx and tongue. The posterior patients also show evidence of subtle phonetic impairments suggesting that the neural instantiation of speech may require more extensive involvement, including the perisylvian area, than previously suggested.},
	Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0093-934X(90)90003-Y}}
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