Basic science at the intersection of speech science and communication disorders. Bernstein, L E and Weismer, G. G Journal of Phonetics, 28(3):225-232.
abstract   bibtex   
In this introduction to this special issue of the Journal of Phonetics, the concept of generalization of scientific explanations across normal individuals and individuals with identified clinical disorders that affect speech production and perception is discussed. Papers dealing with speech production in persons with hearing impairment, aphasia, dysarthria, voice disorders, and structural modifications of the vocal tract, as well as simulations of hearing loss and lexicons show how data from speech and hearing disorders may inform theory about normal processes. In this context, clinical disorders are seen as opportunities for basic scientific research. Associated with these opportunities are potential pitfalls for scientific experimental design. Chief among such pitfalls is the loss of randomized selection of individuals for experimental study. The effect of this problem on experimental design is discussed along with some suggestions for alternative research designs and methods for incorporating results from clinical disorders in basic scientific explanations. © 2000 Academic Press.
@article{bernstein_basic_2000,
	Author = {Bernstein, L E and Weismer, Gary G},
	Date = {2000},
	Date-Modified = {2016-09-24 18:55:59 +0000},
	Issn = {3-4},
	Journal = {Journal of Phonetics},
	Keywords = {clinical, clinical phonetics},
	Number = {3},
	Pages = {225-232},
	Title = {Basic science at the intersection of speech science and communication disorders},
	Volume = {28},
	Abstract = {In this introduction to this special issue of the Journal of Phonetics, the concept of generalization of scientific explanations across normal individuals and individuals with identified clinical disorders that affect speech production and perception is discussed. Papers dealing with speech production in persons with hearing impairment, aphasia, dysarthria, voice disorders, and structural modifications of the vocal tract, as well as simulations of hearing loss and lexicons show how data from speech and hearing disorders may inform theory about normal processes. In this context, clinical disorders are seen as opportunities for basic scientific research. Associated with these opportunities are potential pitfalls for scientific experimental design. Chief among such pitfalls is the loss of randomized selection of individuals for experimental study. The effect of this problem on experimental design is discussed along with some suggestions for alternative research designs and methods for incorporating results from clinical disorders in basic scientific explanations. © 2000 Academic Press.}}
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