The role of distinctive features in the dichotic perception of vowels. Blumstein, S. E; Tartter, V C; Michel, D; Hirsch, B; and Leiter, E Brain and Language, 4(4):508-520.
abstract   bibtex   
A dichotic listening experiment was conducted to determine if vowel perception is based on phonetic feature extraction as is consonant perception. Twenty normal right-handed subjects were given dichotic CV syllables contrasting in final vowels. It was found that, unlike consonants, the perception of dichotic vowels was not significantly lateralized, that the dichotic perception of vowels was not significantly enhanced by the number of phonetic features shared, and that the occurrence of double-blend errors was not greater than chance. However, there was strong evidence for the use of phonetic features at the level of response organization. It is suggested that the differences between vowel and consonant perception reflect the differential availability of the underlying acoustic information from auditory store, rather than differences in processing mechanisms.
@article{blumstein_role_1977,
	Author = {Blumstein, Sheila E and Tartter, V C and Michel, D and Hirsch, B and Leiter, E},
	Date = {1977},
	Date-Modified = {2016-09-24 18:55:59 +0000},
	Journal = {Brain and Language},
	Keywords = {phonetics, phonology, segmental, speech perception},
	Number = {4},
	Pages = {508-520},
	Title = {The role of distinctive features in the dichotic perception of vowels},
	Volume = {4},
	Abstract = {A dichotic listening experiment was conducted to determine if vowel perception is based on phonetic feature extraction as is consonant perception. Twenty normal right-handed subjects were given dichotic CV syllables contrasting in final vowels. It was found that, unlike consonants, the perception of dichotic vowels was not significantly lateralized, that the dichotic perception of vowels was not significantly enhanced by the number of phonetic features shared, and that the occurrence of double-blend errors was not greater than chance. However, there was strong evidence for the use of phonetic features at the level of response organization. It is suggested that the differences between vowel and consonant perception reflect the differential availability of the underlying acoustic information from auditory store, rather than differences in processing mechanisms.}}
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