Realizing the Promise of Research in Policymaking: Theoretical Guidance Grounded in Policymaker Perspectives. Bogenschneider, K.; Corbett, T. J.; and Parrott, E. Journal of Family Theory & Review.
Realizing the Promise of Research in Policymaking: Theoretical Guidance Grounded in Policymaker Perspectives [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
This article explores growing pessimism among those scholars who wish to see rigorous research used more frequently to formulate public policy. That commonsense aspiration is threatened by the impoverished dialogue between the communities that conduct studies (researchers) and those that apply them to decisions (policymakers). To examine this disconnect, the authors advance community dissonance theory, which proposes that a better understanding in the research community of the inhabitants, institutions, and cultures of the policy community could increase communication and trust. Community dissonance theory extends earlier two-communities theories by deconstructing the cultural impediments to optimal communication. Building on previous literature and supported with in-depth interviews of state policymakers, this article examines professional culture and institutional culture (e.g., preferred decision-making processes, interactional preferences, favored epistemological frameworks, dominant influence loops, salient goals, salient stakeholders). The article presents several frictions that occur when cultures clash, discussing their promise and peril for improving research use in policymaking.
@article{bogenschneider_realizing_nodate,
	title = {Realizing the {Promise} of {Research} in {Policymaking}: {Theoretical} {Guidance} {Grounded} in {Policymaker} {Perspectives}},
	volume = {0},
	copyright = {© 2019 National Council on Family Relations},
	issn = {1756-2589},
	shorttitle = {Realizing the {Promise} of {Research} in {Policymaking}},
	url = {https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jftr.12310},
	doi = {10.1111/jftr.12310},
	abstract = {This article explores growing pessimism among those scholars who wish to see rigorous research used more frequently to formulate public policy. That commonsense aspiration is threatened by the impoverished dialogue between the communities that conduct studies (researchers) and those that apply them to decisions (policymakers). To examine this disconnect, the authors advance community dissonance theory, which proposes that a better understanding in the research community of the inhabitants, institutions, and cultures of the policy community could increase communication and trust. Community dissonance theory extends earlier two-communities theories by deconstructing the cultural impediments to optimal communication. Building on previous literature and supported with in-depth interviews of state policymakers, this article examines professional culture and institutional culture (e.g., preferred decision-making processes, interactional preferences, favored epistemological frameworks, dominant influence loops, salient goals, salient stakeholders). The article presents several frictions that occur when cultures clash, discussing their promise and peril for improving research use in policymaking.},
	language = {en},
	number = {0},
	urldate = {2019-02-05},
	journal = {Journal of Family Theory \& Review},
	author = {Bogenschneider, Karen and Corbett, Thomas J. and Parrott, Emily},
	keywords = {Article théorique, Chercheurs, Décideurs, Décideurs politiques, Généralités, Libre accès, Politiques}
}
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