Language experience in second language speech learning: In honor of James Emil Flege. Bohn, O. and Munro, M. J, editors John Benjamins, Amsterdam.
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Dedication ix Alphabetical List of Contributors xi--xiii Acknowledgments xv Biographical Note James Emil Flege xvii PART I: The nature of L2 speech learning 1 The study of second language speech learning: A brief overview Murray J. Munro and Ocke-Schwen Bohn 3--11 Nonnative and second-language speech perception: Commonalities and complementarities Catherine T. Best and Michael D. Tyler 13--34 Cross-language phonetic similarity of vowels: Theoretical and methodological issues Winifred Strange 35--55 Investigating the role of attention in phonetic learning Susan G. Guion and Eric Pederson 57--77 You are what you eat phonetically: The effect of linguistic experience on the perception of foreign vowels Elaina M. Frieda and Takeshi Nozawa 79--96 PART II: The concept of foreign accent 97 Nativelike pronunciation among late learners of French as a second language David Birdsong 99--116 Second language acquisition of a regional dialect of American English by native Japanese speakers Robert Allen Fox and Julie Tevis McGory 117--134 Acoustic variability and perceptual learning: The case of non-native accented speech Allard Jongman and Travis Wade 135--150 PART III: Consonants and vowels 151 Strategies for Realization of L2-Categories: English /s/ --- /z/ Robert McAllister 153--166 Temporal remnants from Mandarin in nonnative English speech Yue Wang and Dawn Behne 167--184 Cross-language consonant identification: English and Korean Anna Marie Schmidt 185--200 The relationship between identification and discrimination in cross-language perception: The case of Korean and Thai Ratree P. Wayland 201--218 PART IV: Beyond consonants and vowels 219 Music and language learning: Effect of musical training on learning L2 speech contrasts Terry L. Gottfried 221--237 Behavioral and cortical effects of learning a second language: The acquisition of tone Joan A. Sereno and Yue Wang 239--258 The perception of tones and phones Denis Burnham and Karen Mattock 259--280 Prosody in second language acquisition: Acoustic analyses of duration and F0 range Katsura Aoyama and Susan G. Guion 281--297 PART V: Emerging issues 299 Implications of James E. Flege's research for the foreign language classroom Thorsten Piske 301--314 Speech learning, lexical reorganization, and the development of word recognition by native and non-native English speakers Amanda C. Walley 315--330 Phonemic errors in different word positions and their effects on intelligibility of non-native speech: All's well that begins well Tessa Bent, Ann R. Bradlow and Bruce Smith 331--347 The graphical basis of phones and phonemes Robert F. Port 349--365 References 367--398 Author Index 399--403 Subject Index 405--40
@book{bohn_language_2007,
	Address = {Amsterdam},
	Date = {2007},
	Date-Modified = {2016-09-23 19:24:16 +0000},
	Editor = {Bohn, Ocke-Schwen and Munro, Murray J},
	Isbn = {978-90-272-1973-2},
	Keywords = {L2, phonetics},
	Publisher = {John Benjamins},
	Series = {Language {Learning} and {Language} {Teaching}},
	Title = {Language experience in second language speech learning: In honor of James Emil Flege},
	Abstract = {Dedication ix Alphabetical List of Contributors xi--xiii Acknowledgments xv Biographical Note James Emil Flege xvii PART I: The nature of L2 speech learning 1 The study of second language speech learning: A brief overview Murray J. Munro and Ocke-Schwen Bohn 3--11 Nonnative and second-language speech perception: Commonalities and complementarities Catherine T. Best and Michael D. Tyler 13--34 Cross-language phonetic similarity of vowels: Theoretical and methodological issues Winifred Strange 35--55 Investigating the role of attention in phonetic learning Susan G. Guion and Eric Pederson 57--77 You are what you eat phonetically: The effect of linguistic experience on the perception of foreign vowels Elaina M. Frieda and Takeshi Nozawa 79--96 PART II: The concept of foreign accent 97 Nativelike pronunciation among late learners of French as a second language David Birdsong 99--116 Second language acquisition of a regional dialect of American English by native Japanese speakers Robert Allen Fox and Julie Tevis McGory 117--134 Acoustic variability and perceptual learning: The case of non-native accented speech Allard Jongman and Travis Wade 135--150 PART III: Consonants and vowels 151 Strategies for Realization of L2-Categories: English /s/ --- /z/ Robert McAllister 153--166 Temporal remnants from Mandarin in nonnative English speech Yue Wang and Dawn Behne 167--184 Cross-language consonant identification: English and Korean Anna Marie Schmidt 185--200 The relationship between identification and discrimination in cross-language perception: The case of Korean and Thai Ratree P. Wayland 201--218 PART IV: Beyond consonants and vowels 219 Music and language learning: Effect of musical training on learning L2 speech contrasts Terry L. Gottfried 221--237 Behavioral and cortical effects of learning a second language: The acquisition of tone Joan A. Sereno and Yue Wang 239--258 The perception of tones and phones Denis Burnham and Karen Mattock 259--280 Prosody in second language acquisition: Acoustic analyses of duration and F0 range Katsura Aoyama and Susan G. Guion 281--297 PART V: Emerging issues 299 Implications of James E. Flege's research for the foreign language classroom Thorsten Piske 301--314 Speech learning, lexical reorganization, and the development of word recognition by native and non-native English speakers Amanda C. Walley 315--330 Phonemic errors in different word positions and their effects on intelligibility of non-native speech: All's well that begins well Tessa Bent, Ann R. Bradlow and Bruce Smith 331--347 The graphical basis of phones and phonemes Robert F. Port 349--365 References 367--398 Author Index 399--403 Subject Index 405--40}}
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