Second language accent and pronunciation teaching: A research-based approach. Derwing, T. M and Munro, M. J TESOL Quarterly, 39(3):379-397.
Second language accent and pronunciation teaching: A research-based approach [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Empirical studies are essential to improving our understanding of the relationship between accent and pronunciation teaching. However, the study of pronunciation has been marginalized within the field of applied linguistics. As a result, teachers are often left to rely on their own intuitions with little direction. Although some instructors can successfully assist their students under these conditions, many others are reluctant to teach pronunciation. In this article we call for more research to enhance our knowledge of the nature of foreign accents and their effects on communication. Research of this type has much to offer to teachers and students in terms of helping them to set learning goals, identifying appropriate pedagogical priorities for the classroom, and determining the most effective approaches to teaching. We discuss these possibilities within a framework in which mutual intelligibility is the primary consideration, although social ramifications of accent must also be taken into account. We describe several problem areas and identify some misconceptions about pronunciation instruction. In addition, we make suggestions for future research that would address intelligibility, functional load, computer-assisted language learning, and the role of the listener. Finally, we recommend greater collaboration between researchers and practitioners, such that more classroom-relevant research is undertaken.
@article{derwing_second_2005,
	Author = {Derwing, Tracey M and Munro, Murray J},
	Date = {2005},
	Date-Modified = {2017-04-19 08:04:06 +0000},
	Doi = {10.2307/3588486},
	Issn = {00398322},
	Journal = {TESOL Quarterly},
	Keywords = {L2, L2 teaching, pronunciation teaching},
	Number = {3},
	Pages = {379-397},
	Title = {Second language accent and pronunciation teaching: A research-based approach},
	Url = {http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/3588486?origin=crossref},
	Volume = {39},
	Abstract = {Empirical studies are essential to improving our understanding of the relationship between accent and pronunciation teaching. However, the study of pronunciation has been marginalized within the field of applied linguistics. As a result, teachers are often left to rely on their own intuitions with little direction. Although some instructors can successfully assist their students under these conditions, many others are reluctant to teach pronunciation. In this article we call for more research to enhance our knowledge of the nature of foreign accents and their effects on communication. Research of this type has much to offer to teachers and students in terms of helping them to set learning goals, identifying appropriate pedagogical priorities for the classroom, and determining the most effective approaches to teaching. We discuss these possibilities within a framework in which mutual intelligibility is the primary consideration, although social ramifications of accent must also be taken into account. We describe several problem areas and identify some misconceptions about pronunciation instruction. In addition, we make suggestions for future research that would address intelligibility, functional load, computer-assisted language learning, and the role of the listener. Finally, we recommend greater collaboration between researchers and practitioners, such that more classroom-relevant research is undertaken.},
	Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/3588486?origin=crossref},
	Bdsk-Url-2 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/3588486}}
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