Some constraints on functionally disordered phonologies: phonetic inventories and phonotactics. Dinnsen, D. A; Chin, S. B; Elbert, M.; and Powell, T. W Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 33(1):28-37.
abstract   bibtex   
The phonological systems of 40 functional misarticulators, ages 40 to 80 months were examined in terms of the nature and variation of phonetic inventories and phonotactic constraints. It was found that these properties of disordered systems were governed by severe constraints that yielded a typological characterization of such systems along with associated implicational laws. The principles governing disordered systems were also found to parallel closely the principles governing normal first language acquisition. The evidence suggests that at least these properties of disordered systems represent delays in the normal acquisition process and are not otherwise deviant. The assessment and treatment of functional disorders along with the projection of learning patterns can thus appeal to principles of governing such phonological systems.
@article{dinnsen_constraints_1990,
	Author = {Dinnsen, Daniel A and Chin, Steven B and Elbert, Mary and Powell, Thomas W},
	Date = {1990},
	Date-Modified = {2016-09-24 18:56:02 +0000},
	Journal = {Journal of Speech and Hearing Research},
	Keywords = {clinical, clinical phonetics, clinical phonology},
	Number = {1},
	Pages = {28-37},
	Title = {Some constraints on functionally disordered phonologies: phonetic inventories and phonotactics},
	Volume = {33},
	Abstract = {The phonological systems of 40 functional misarticulators, ages 40 to 80 months were examined in terms of the nature and variation of phonetic inventories and phonotactic constraints. It was found that these properties of disordered systems were governed by severe constraints that yielded a typological characterization of such systems along with associated implicational laws. The principles governing disordered systems were also found to parallel closely the principles governing normal first language acquisition. The evidence suggests that at least these properties of disordered systems represent delays in the normal acquisition process and are not otherwise deviant. The assessment and treatment of functional disorders along with the projection of learning patterns can thus appeal to principles of governing such phonological systems.}}
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