Peptic Ulcer Disease in Children: Etiology, Clinical Findings, and Clinical Course. Drumm, B., Rhoads, J. M., Stringer, D. A., Sherman, P. M., Ellis, L. E., & Durie, P. R. Pediatrics, 82(3):410--414, September, 1988. 00126
Peptic Ulcer Disease in Children: Etiology, Clinical Findings, and Clinical Course [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
The records of all children with peptic ulcer disease at the Hospital for Sick Children were retrospectively evaluated, excluding neonates, throughout a 5-year period. Only cases with a definite ulcer crater identified either at endoscopy or at surgery were included. There were 36 patients, 20 boys and 16 girls. Duodenal ulcers were more common than gastric ulcers (2.8:1). Ages ranged from 3 months to 17 years, with a mean age of 10 years. Patients were reviewed with respect to etiology of peptic ulcer disease, age when first examined, initial symptoms, and clinical course. Patients were divided into two groups, those with primary (n = 19) and those with secondary (n = 17) peptic ulcer disease. All peptic ulcers in patients younger than 10 years of age were secondary in nature. Secondary ulcers occurred generally in association with a severe underlying illness (11/17), and many ulcers necessitated emergency surgery because of perforation and/or severe hemorrhage (8/17). None of these patients had chronic or recurrent symptoms. In contrast, in children with primary peptic ulcer disease, initial symptoms were more benign. Most patients had abdominal pain and only one required emergency surgery. Children with primary duodenal ulcer disease had a high incidence of recurrent symptoms (67%), however, with surgery for intractable disease necessitated in 40%. Single-contrast barium meals were found to be unreliable in establishing a diagnosis of peptic ulcer disease, particularly cases of gastric ulcer disease.
@article{drumm_peptic_1988,
	title = {Peptic {Ulcer} {Disease} in {Children}: {Etiology}, {Clinical} {Findings}, and {Clinical} {Course}},
	volume = {82},
	issn = {0031-4005, 1098-4275},
	shorttitle = {Peptic {Ulcer} {Disease} in {Children}},
	url = {http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/82/3/410},
	abstract = {The records of all children with peptic ulcer disease at the Hospital for Sick Children were retrospectively evaluated, excluding neonates, throughout a 5-year period. Only cases with a definite ulcer crater identified either at endoscopy or at surgery were included. There were 36 patients, 20 boys and 16 girls. Duodenal ulcers were more common than gastric ulcers (2.8:1). Ages ranged from 3 months to 17 years, with a mean age of 10 years. Patients were reviewed with respect to etiology of peptic ulcer disease, age when first examined, initial symptoms, and clinical course. Patients were divided into two groups, those with primary (n = 19) and those with secondary (n = 17) peptic ulcer disease. All peptic ulcers in patients younger than 10 years of age were secondary in nature. Secondary ulcers occurred generally in association with a severe underlying illness (11/17), and many ulcers necessitated emergency surgery because of perforation and/or severe hemorrhage (8/17). None of these patients had chronic or recurrent symptoms. In contrast, in children with primary peptic ulcer disease, initial symptoms were more benign. Most patients had abdominal pain and only one required emergency surgery. Children with primary duodenal ulcer disease had a high incidence of recurrent symptoms (67\%), however, with surgery for intractable disease necessitated in 40\%. Single-contrast barium meals were found to be unreliable in establishing a diagnosis of peptic ulcer disease, particularly cases of gastric ulcer disease.},
	language = {en},
	number = {3},
	urldate = {2015-06-19TZ},
	journal = {Pediatrics},
	author = {Drumm, Brendan and Rhoads, J. Marc and Stringer, David A. and Sherman, Phillip M. and Ellis, Lynda E. and Durie, Peter R.},
	month = sep,
	year = {1988},
	pmid = {3405676},
	note = {00126 },
	keywords = {Endoscopy, peptic ulcer},
	pages = {410--414}
}

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