Fibers in lung tissues of mesothelioma cases among miners and millers of the township of asbestos, quebec. Dufresne, A., Harrigan, M., Massé, S., & Bégin, R. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 27(4):581–592, 1995.
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Twenty cases of mesothelioma among miners of the township of Asbestos, Quebec, Canada, have been reported. To further explore the mineral characteristics of various fibrous material, we studied the fibrous inorganic content of postmortem lung tissues of 12 of 20 available cases. In each case, we measured concentrations of chrysotile, amosite, crocidolite, tremolite, talc‐anthophyllite, and other fibrous minerals. The average diameter, length, and length‐to‐diameter ratio of each type of fiber were also calculated. For total fibers \textgreater 5 μm, we found \textgreater 1,000 asbestos fibers per mg tissue (f/mg) in all cases; tremolite was above 1,000 f/mg in 8 cases, chrysotile in 6 cases, crocidolite in 4 cases, and talc anthophyllite in 5 cases. Among cases with asbestos fibers, the tremolite count was highest in 7 cases, chrysotile in 3 cases, and crocidolite in 2 cases. The geometric mean concentrations of fibers ⩾ 5 μm were in the following decreasing order: tremolite \textgreater crocidolite \textgreater chrysotile \textgreater other fibers \textgreater talc‐anthophyllite \textgreater amosite. For total fibers \textless 5 μm, we found \textgreater 1,000 fibers per mg tissue (f/mg) in all cases; tremolite was above 1,000 f/mg in 12 cases, chrysotile in 8 cases, crocidolite in 7 cases, and talc‐anthophyllite in 6 cases. Tremolite was highest in 8 cases, chrysotile in 2 cases, and crocidolite and amosite in 2 cases. The geometric mean concentrations of fibers \textless 5 μm were in the following decreasing order: tremolite \textgreater other fibers \textgreater chrysotile \textgreater crocidolite \textgreater talc‐anthophyllite \textgreater amosite. We conclude, on the basis of the lung burden analyses of 12 mesothelioma cases from the Asbestos township of Quebec, that the imported amphibole (crocidolite and amosite) were the dominant fibers retained in the lung tissue in 2/12 cases. In 10/12 cases, fibers from the mine site (chrysotile and tremolite) were found at highest counts; tremolite was clearly the highest in 6, chrysotile in 2, and 2 cases had about the same counts for tremolite and chrysotile. If a relation of fiber burden‐causality of mesothelioma is accepted, mesothelioma would be likely caused by amphibole contamination of the plant in 2/12 cases and by the mineral fibers (tremolite and chrysotile) from the mine site in the 10 other cases. Copyright © 1995 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company
@article{dufresne_fibers_1995,
	title = {Fibers in lung tissues of mesothelioma cases among miners and millers of the township of asbestos, quebec},
	volume = {27},
	doi = {10.1002/ajim.4700270412},
	abstract = {Twenty cases of mesothelioma among miners of the township of Asbestos, Quebec, Canada, have been reported. To further explore the mineral characteristics of various fibrous material, we studied the fibrous inorganic content of postmortem lung tissues of 12 of 20 available cases. In each case, we measured concentrations of chrysotile, amosite, crocidolite, tremolite, talc‐anthophyllite, and other fibrous minerals. The average diameter, length, and length‐to‐diameter ratio of each type of fiber were also calculated. For total fibers {\textgreater} 5 μm, we found {\textgreater} 1,000 asbestos fibers per mg tissue (f/mg) in all cases; tremolite was above 1,000 f/mg in 8 cases, chrysotile in 6 cases, crocidolite in 4 cases, and talc anthophyllite in 5 cases. Among cases with asbestos fibers, the tremolite count was highest in 7 cases, chrysotile in 3 cases, and crocidolite in 2 cases. The geometric mean concentrations of fibers ⩾ 5 μm were in the following decreasing order: tremolite {\textgreater} crocidolite {\textgreater} chrysotile {\textgreater} other fibers {\textgreater} talc‐anthophyllite {\textgreater} amosite. For total fibers {\textless} 5 μm, we found {\textgreater} 1,000 fibers per mg tissue (f/mg) in all cases; tremolite was above 1,000 f/mg in 12 cases, chrysotile in 8 cases, crocidolite in 7 cases, and talc‐anthophyllite in 6 cases. Tremolite was highest in 8 cases, chrysotile in 2 cases, and crocidolite and amosite in 2 cases. The geometric mean concentrations of fibers {\textless} 5 μm were in the following decreasing order: tremolite {\textgreater} other fibers {\textgreater} chrysotile {\textgreater} crocidolite {\textgreater} talc‐anthophyllite {\textgreater} amosite. We conclude, on the basis of the lung burden analyses of 12 mesothelioma cases from the Asbestos township of Quebec, that the imported amphibole (crocidolite and amosite) were the dominant fibers retained in the lung tissue in 2/12 cases. In 10/12 cases, fibers from the mine site (chrysotile and tremolite) were found at highest counts; tremolite was clearly the highest in 6, chrysotile in 2, and 2 cases had about the same counts for tremolite and chrysotile. If a relation of fiber burden‐causality of mesothelioma is accepted, mesothelioma would be likely caused by amphibole contamination of the plant in 2/12 cases and by the mineral fibers (tremolite and chrysotile) from the mine site in the 10 other cases. Copyright © 1995 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company},
	number = {4},
	journal = {American Journal of Industrial Medicine},
	author = {Dufresne, A. and Harrigan, M. and Massé, S. and Bégin, R.},
	year = {1995},
	keywords = {tremolite et chrysotile cause mésotholiome},
	pages = {581--592}
}

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