Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO): a longitudinal case series review. Falip, C., Alison, M., Boutry, N., Job-Deslandre, C., Cotten, A., Azoulay, R., & Adamsbaum, C. Pediatric Radiology, 43(3):355--375, March, 2013.
Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO): a longitudinal case series review [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
BackgroundChronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an autoinflammatory disorder that is currently diagnosed based on clinical, radiologic, pathological and longitudinal findings.ObjectiveTo provide detailed descriptions of CRMO lesion patterns seen on radiographs and MRI and to suggest clinical use of whole-body MRI and propose noninvasive diagnostic strategy.Materials and methodsRetrospective longitudinal study (1989–2010) of 31 children (22 girls, 9 boys) diagnosed with CRMO. Imaging data were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists.ResultsMean age at diagnosis was 11 years (3–17). A total of 108 lesions were investigated. The most common sites were the long bone metaphyses (56 lesions in 24 children) especially femoral and tibial (20/24); pelvis (10/31); spine (9/31); clavicle (6/31) and mandible (3/31). In long bones, the radiologic appearance was normal (22/56), mixed lytic and sclerotic (20/56), sclerotic (8/56) or lytic (6/56) often juxtaphyseal (36/56), with hyperostosis or periosteal thickening (10/56). Vertebral involvement was often multifocal (6/9). Medullary edema was seen on MRI (42) with epiphyseal (23/42) or soft-tissue (22/42) inflammation and juxtaphyseal nodule-like appearance (7/42). Whole-body MRI (15/31) was key in detecting subclinical lesions.ConclusionCRMO is a polymorphous disorder in which whole-body MRI is extremely useful for showing subclinical edema. Vertebral collapse requires long-term monitoring.
@article{falip_chronic_2013,
	title = {Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis ({CRMO}): a longitudinal case series review},
	volume = {43},
	issn = {0301-0449, 1432-1998},
	shorttitle = {Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis ({CRMO})},
	url = {https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00247-012-2544-6},
	doi = {10.1007/s00247-012-2544-6},
	abstract = {BackgroundChronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an autoinflammatory disorder that is currently diagnosed based on clinical, radiologic, pathological and longitudinal findings.ObjectiveTo provide detailed descriptions of CRMO lesion patterns seen on radiographs and MRI and to suggest clinical use of whole-body MRI and propose noninvasive diagnostic strategy.Materials and methodsRetrospective longitudinal study (1989–2010) of 31 children (22 girls, 9 boys) diagnosed with CRMO. Imaging data were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists.ResultsMean age at diagnosis was 11 years (3–17). A total of 108 lesions were investigated. The most common sites were the long bone metaphyses (56 lesions in 24 children) especially femoral and tibial (20/24); pelvis (10/31); spine (9/31); clavicle (6/31) and mandible (3/31). In long bones, the radiologic appearance was normal (22/56), mixed lytic and sclerotic (20/56), sclerotic (8/56) or lytic (6/56) often juxtaphyseal (36/56), with hyperostosis or periosteal thickening (10/56). Vertebral involvement was often multifocal (6/9). Medullary edema was seen on MRI (42) with epiphyseal (23/42) or soft-tissue (22/42) inflammation and juxtaphyseal nodule-like appearance (7/42). Whole-body MRI (15/31) was key in detecting subclinical lesions.ConclusionCRMO is a polymorphous disorder in which whole-body MRI is extremely useful for showing subclinical edema. Vertebral collapse requires long-term monitoring.},
	language = {en},
	number = {3},
	urldate = {2017-05-31TZ},
	journal = {Pediatric Radiology},
	author = {Falip, Céline and Alison, Marianne and Boutry, Nathalie and Job-Deslandre, Chantal and Cotten, Anne and Azoulay, Robin and Adamsbaum, Catherine},
	month = mar,
	year = {2013},
	pages = {355--375}
}

Downloads: 0