On the Use of Nudges to Affect Spillovers in Environmental Behaviors. Fanghella, V., d’Adda , G., & Tavoni, M. Frontiers in Psychology, 10:61, January, 2019.
On the Use of Nudges to Affect Spillovers in Environmental Behaviors [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Environmental self-identity is considered a promising lever to generate positive spillovers across pro-environmental behaviors: existing evidence shows that it is positively correlated with pro-environmental choices and that it can be easily manipulated, by reminding individuals of their past pro-environmental actions. However, it remains unclear whether it can be successfully used for environmental policy making. In two online, incentive-compatible experiments, we manipulate participants’ environmental self-identity and test whether this leads to increased donations to an environmental charity. Additionally, we investigate the interaction between self-identity priming and two commonly used behavioral policy tools: social information (Study 1, N = 400) and goal commitment (Study 2, N = 495). Our results suggest caution in leveraging environmental self-identity to promote pro-environmental behaviors, provide indications on how to target policies based on self-identity primes, and offer novel evidence on the interaction between different behavioral policy tools.
@article{fanghella_use_2019,
	title = {On the {Use} of {Nudges} to {Affect} {Spillovers} in {Environmental} {Behaviors}},
	volume = {10},
	issn = {1664-1078},
	url = {https://www.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00061/full},
	doi = {10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00061},
	abstract = {Environmental self-identity is considered a promising lever to generate positive spillovers across pro-environmental behaviors: existing evidence shows that it is positively correlated with pro-environmental choices and that it can be easily manipulated, by reminding individuals of their past pro-environmental actions. However, it remains unclear whether it can be successfully used for environmental policy making. In two online, incentive-compatible experiments, we manipulate participants’ environmental self-identity and test whether this leads to increased donations to an environmental charity. Additionally, we investigate the interaction between self-identity priming and two commonly used behavioral policy tools: social information (Study 1, N = 400) and goal commitment (Study 2, N = 495). Our results suggest caution in leveraging environmental self-identity to promote pro-environmental behaviors, provide indications on how to target policies based on self-identity primes, and offer novel evidence on the interaction between different behavioral policy tools.},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2020-09-28},
	journal = {Frontiers in Psychology},
	author = {Fanghella, Valeria and d’Adda, Giovanna and Tavoni, Massimo},
	month = jan,
	year = {2019},
	pages = {61}
}

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