More accurate neuronavigation data provided by biomechanical modeling instead of rigid registration. Garlapati, R. R., Roy, A., Joldes, G. R., Wittek, A., Mostayed, A., Doyle, B., Warfield, S. K., Kikinis, R., Knuckey, N., Bunt, S., & Miller, K. J Neurosurg, 120(6):1477--1483, Jun, 2014.
More accurate neuronavigation data provided by biomechanical modeling instead of rigid registration. [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
It is possible to improve neuronavigation during image-guided surgery by warping the high-quality preoperative brain images so that they correspond with the current intraoperative configuration of the brain. In this paper, the accuracy of registration results obtained using comprehensive biomechanical models is compared with the accuracy of rigid registration, the technology currently available to patients. This comparison allows investigation into whether biomechanical modeling provides good-quality image data for neuronavigation for a larger proportion of patients than rigid registration. Preoperative images for 33 neurosurgery cases were warped onto their respective intraoperative configurations using both the biomechanics-based method and rigid registration. The Hausdorff distance-based evaluation process, which measures the difference between images, was used to quantify the performance of both registration methods. A statistical test for difference in proportions was conducted to evaluate the null hypothesis that the proportion of patients for whom improved neuronavigation can be achieved is the same for rigid and biomechanics-based registration. The null hypothesis was confidently rejected (p < 10(-4)). Even the modified hypothesis that fewer than 25% of patients would benefit from the use of biomechanics-based registration was rejected at a significance level of 5% (p = 0.02). The biomechanics-based method proved particularly effective in cases demonstrating large craniotomy-induced brain deformations. The outcome of this analysis suggests that nonlinear biomechanics-based methods are beneficial to a large proportion of patients and can be considered for use in the operating theater as a possible means of improving neuronavigation and surgical outcomes.
@Article{2014jungarlapatimillerJNmore,
  author      = {Garlapati, Revanth Reddy and Roy, Aditi and Joldes, Grand Roman and Wittek, Adam and Mostayed, Ahmed and Doyle, Barry and Warfield, Simon Keith and Kikinis, Ron and Knuckey, Neville and Bunt, Stuart and Miller, Karol},
  title       = {More accurate neuronavigation data provided by biomechanical modeling instead of rigid registration.},
  journal     = {J Neurosurg},
  year        = {2014},
  volume      = {120},
  number      = {6},
  pages       = {1477--1483},
  month       = {Jun},
  abstract    = {It is possible to improve neuronavigation during image-guided surgery by warping the high-quality preoperative brain images so that they correspond with the current intraoperative configuration of the brain. In this paper, the accuracy of registration results obtained using comprehensive biomechanical models is compared with the accuracy of rigid registration, the technology currently available to patients. This comparison allows investigation into whether biomechanical modeling provides good-quality image data for neuronavigation for a larger proportion of patients than rigid registration. Preoperative images for 33 neurosurgery cases were warped onto their respective intraoperative configurations using both the biomechanics-based method and rigid registration. The Hausdorff distance-based evaluation process, which measures the difference between images, was used to quantify the performance of both registration methods. A statistical test for difference in proportions was conducted to evaluate the null hypothesis that the proportion of patients for whom improved neuronavigation can be achieved is the same for rigid and biomechanics-based registration. The null hypothesis was confidently rejected (p < 10(-4)). Even the modified hypothesis that fewer than 25\% of patients would benefit from the use of biomechanics-based registration was rejected at a significance level of 5\% (p = 0.02). The biomechanics-based method proved particularly effective in cases demonstrating large craniotomy-induced brain deformations. The outcome of this analysis suggests that nonlinear biomechanics-based methods are beneficial to a large proportion of patients and can be considered for use in the operating theater as a possible means of improving neuronavigation and surgical outcomes.},
  doi         = {10.3171/2013.12.JNS131165},
  file        = {2014jungarlapatimillerJNmore.pdf:2014jungarlapatimillerJNmore.pdf:PDF},
  institution = {Intelligent Systems for Medicine Laboratory;},
  keywords    = {Biomechanical Phenomena; Brain Neoplasms, surgery; Brain, pathology/surgery; Humans; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Models, Biological; Models, Theoretical; Neuronavigation, methods; Neurosurgical Procedures, methods; Surgery, Computer-Assisted, methods},
  language    = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  pmc         = {PMC4386882},
  pmid        = {24460486},
  url         = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2013.12.JNS131165},
}

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