Connecting research and practice. Gershoff, E. T., Mistry, R., & Crosby, D. A., editors In Gershoff, E. T., Mistry, R., & Crosby, D. A., editors, Societal contexts of child development: pathways of influence and implications for practice and policy. Oxford University Press, Oxford ; New York, 2014.
abstract   bibtex   
(from the chapter) There is a common model-shared by many researchers and funders-that describes how applied developmental science is used to improve young people's lives. Researchers do rigorous studies, develop important findings, and clearly communicate those findings to policy makers and practiioners, who in turn use them to shape policy and practice to improve the lives of young people. Given the significant changes over the past 30 years in how research is conducted and disseminated, we should expect to see accompanying improvements in child and youth outcomes. There are, however, few examples of research informing policy or practice and improving youth outcomes on a broad scale (Granger, 2011). We frame our discussion around three reasons why research and practice are poorly connected: 1. Differences in areas such as language, norms, and incentives separate researchers and practitioners and lead to differing definitions of what counts as evidence; 2. Practitioners do not trust the relevance of research findings or the motives behind many interpretations of findings; and 3. Research evidence is not readily accessible or easily interpreted. In developing our analysis, we draw on research studies as well as on conceptual and exploratory work we commissioned in the past few years (Coburn, Penuel, & Geil, 2012; Davies & Nutley, 2008; Nelson, Leffler, & Hansen, 2009) and a framework we developed for guiding our grant making in this area (Tseng, 2012b). These sources consider the processes by which practitioners and policy makers define, acquire, interpret, and use research evidence. In general, we are less focused on the individual actors and more on how their social networks, organizational settings, and political, policy, and service contexts affect such processes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
@incollection{gershoff_connecting_2014,
	address = {Oxford ; New York},
	title = {Connecting research and practice},
	isbn = {9780199943913},
	abstract = {(from the chapter) There is a common model-shared by many researchers and funders-that describes how applied developmental science is used to improve young people's lives. Researchers do rigorous studies, develop important findings, and clearly communicate those findings to policy makers and practiioners, who in turn use them to shape policy and practice to improve the lives of young people. Given the significant changes over the past 30 years in how research is conducted and disseminated, we should expect to see accompanying improvements in child and youth outcomes. There are, however, few examples of research informing policy or practice and improving youth outcomes on a broad scale (Granger, 2011). We frame our discussion around three reasons why research and practice are poorly connected: 1. Differences in areas such as language, norms, and incentives separate researchers and practitioners and lead to differing definitions of what counts as evidence; 2. Practitioners do not trust the relevance of research findings or the motives behind many interpretations of findings; and 3. Research evidence is not readily accessible or easily interpreted. In developing our analysis, we draw on research studies as well as on conceptual and exploratory work we commissioned in the past few years (Coburn, Penuel, \& Geil, 2012; Davies \& Nutley, 2008; Nelson, Leffler, \& Hansen, 2009) and a framework we developed for guiding our grant making in this area (Tseng, 2012b). These sources consider the processes by which practitioners and policy makers define, acquire, interpret, and use research evidence. In general, we are less focused on the individual actors and more on how their social networks, organizational settings, and political, policy, and service contexts affect such processes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)},
	booktitle = {Societal contexts of child development: pathways of influence and implications for practice and policy},
	publisher = {Oxford University Press},
	editor = {Gershoff, Elizabeth T. and Mistry, Rashmita and Crosby, Danielle A.},
	year = {2014},
	keywords = {Article théorique, Chapitre de livre, Décideurs, Décideurs politiques, Déterminants, Impacts et effets, Intervenants et praticiens, Modèles, Santé publique}
}

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