A theology of higher education /. Higton, M. Oxford University Press,, Oxford ;, 2012.
abstract   bibtex   
Higton, currently a professor at Durham University (UK), asks what those who share his "theological commitments might do to help [secular] universities approximate to their proper good more fully," and develops an answer (representing an "Anglican Theology of Learning") around three themes: 1) higher education as training in intellectual virtue; 2) the inherent sociality of university learning, reason, and knowledge; and 3) the proper orientation of higher education towards the common good--the public good (p. 1). At least some of the founders of the first university in Paris, Higton argues, "understood it as a new form of corporate spiritual discipline." (253) He is, in part, attempting to refute Stanley Hauerwas's contention that Christians cannot legitimately participate "in the university as we know it." (253)
@book{ higton_theology_2012,
  address = {Oxford ;},
  title = {A theology of higher education /},
  isbn = {978019964},
  abstract = {Higton, currently a professor at Durham University (UK), asks what those who share his "theological commitments might do to help [secular] universities approximate to their proper good more fully," and develops an answer (representing an "Anglican Theology of Learning") around three themes: 1) higher education as training in intellectual virtue; 2) the inherent sociality of university learning, reason, and knowledge; and 3) the proper orientation of higher education towards the common good--the public good (p. 1). At least some of the founders of the first university in Paris, Higton argues, "understood it as a new form of corporate spiritual discipline." (253) He is, in part, attempting to refute Stanley Hauerwas's contention that Christians cannot legitimately participate "in the university as we know it." (253)},
  publisher = {Oxford University Press,},
  author = {Higton, Mike},
  year = {2012},
  keywords = {FLphilosophy, FLuniversity}
}

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