Is it worth engaging in multi-stakeholder health services research collaborations? Reflections on key benefits, challenges and enabling mechanisms. Hinchcliff, R., Greenfield, D., & Braithwaite, J. International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 26(2):124–128, April, 2014. Multi-Stakeholder Health Services Research Collaborations (M-SHSRCs) are increasingly pursued internationally to undertake complex implementation research that aims to directly improve the organisation and delivery of health care. Yet the empirical evidence supporting M-SHSRCs’ capacity to achieve such goals is limited, and significant impediments to effective implementation are identified in the literature. This dichotomy raises the question, ‘is it worth engaging in M-SHSRCs?’ In this paper, we contribute to the narrative evidence-base by outlining key issues emerging from our substantial collaborative experience in Australia. Key benefits, challenges and mechanisms that may enable effective implementation of M-SHSRCs in other contexts are highlighted. We conclude that M-SHSRCs are worthwhile and succeed through significant financial, temporal and emotional investments.
Is it worth engaging in multi-stakeholder health services research collaborations? Reflections on key benefits, challenges and enabling mechanisms [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Multi-Stakeholder Health Services Research Collaborations (M-SHSRCs) are increasingly pursued internationally to undertake complex implementation research that aims to directly improve the organisation and delivery of health care. Yet the empirical evidence supporting M-SHSRCs’ capacity to achieve such goals is limited, and significant impediments to effective implementation are identified in the literature. This dichotomy raises the question, ‘is it worth engaging in M-SHSRCs?’ In this paper, we contribute to the narrative evidence-base by outlining key issues emerging from our substantial collaborative experience in Australia. Key benefits, challenges and mechanisms that may enable effective implementation of M-SHSRCs in other contexts are highlighted. We conclude that M-SHSRCs are worthwhile and succeed through significant financial, temporal and emotional investments.
@article{hinchcliff_is_2014,
	title = {Is it worth engaging in multi-stakeholder health services research collaborations? {Reflections} on key benefits, challenges and enabling mechanisms},
	volume = {26},
	copyright = {© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved},
	issn = {1353-4505, 1464-3677},
	shorttitle = {Is it worth engaging in multi-stakeholder health services research collaborations?},
	url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/intqhc/mzu009},
	abstract = {Multi-Stakeholder Health Services Research Collaborations (M-SHSRCs) are increasingly pursued internationally to undertake complex implementation research that aims to directly improve the organisation and delivery of health care. Yet the empirical evidence supporting M-SHSRCs’ capacity to achieve such goals is limited, and significant impediments to effective implementation are identified in the literature. This dichotomy raises the question, ‘is it worth engaging in M-SHSRCs?’ In this paper, we contribute to the narrative evidence-base by outlining key issues emerging from our substantial collaborative experience in Australia. Key benefits, challenges and mechanisms that may enable effective implementation of M-SHSRCs in other contexts are highlighted. We conclude that M-SHSRCs are worthwhile and succeed through significant financial, temporal and emotional investments.},
	language = {en},
	number = {2},
	urldate = {2015-01-19},
	journal = {International Journal for Quality in Health Care},
	author = {Hinchcliff, Reece and Greenfield, David and Braithwaite, Jeffrey},
	month = apr,
	year = {2014},
	pmid = {24519121},
	note = {Multi-Stakeholder Health Services Research Collaborations (M-SHSRCs) are increasingly pursued internationally to undertake complex implementation research that aims to directly improve the organisation and delivery of health care. Yet the empirical evidence supporting M-SHSRCs’ capacity to achieve such goals is limited, and significant impediments to effective implementation are identified in the literature. This dichotomy raises the question, ‘is it worth engaging in M-SHSRCs?’ In this paper, we contribute to the narrative evidence-base by outlining key issues emerging from our substantial collaborative experience in Australia. Key benefits, challenges and mechanisms that may enable effective implementation of M-SHSRCs in other contexts are highlighted. We conclude that M-SHSRCs are worthwhile and succeed through significant financial, temporal and emotional investments.},
	keywords = {Article théorique, Déterminants, Impacts et effets, Méthodologie, Santé et services sociaux, Stratégies},
	pages = {124--128}
}

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