The acoustic and physiologic characteristics of neurologically impaired speech movements. Kent, R. D In Hardcastle, W J and Marchal, A, editors, Speech production and speech modelling, pages 365-401. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht.
abstract   bibtex   
The study of neurologic disorders of spoken language is of course important to the improvement of clinical services for those with communicative impairments. But, in addition, the study of these disorders complements the study of normal speech to reach an understanding of the neural regulation of spoken language. Ideally, data on both normal and disordered speech will be embraced by common theoretical frameworks, so as to permit an effective consideration of these two sources of knowledge. Two such frameworks are discussed. One is an information processing perspective on utterance formulation and production. The other is a model of the neural regulation of voluntary movements. These frameworks are considered in relation to the disorders of conduction aphasia, apraxia of speech, and the dysarthrias associated with Parkinson's disease, cerebellar disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Finally, points of connection between the two theoretical frameworks are discussed.
@incollection{kent_acoustic_1990,
	Address = {Dordrecht},
	Author = {Kent, Raymond D},
	Booktitle = {Speech production and speech modelling},
	Date = {1990},
	Date-Modified = {2016-09-24 18:56:06 +0000},
	Editor = {Hardcastle, W J and Marchal, A},
	Keywords = {clinical, clinical phonetics, dysarthria, neurolinguistics},
	Pages = {365-401},
	Publisher = {Kluwer Academic Publishers},
	Title = {The acoustic and physiologic characteristics of neurologically impaired speech movements},
	Abstract = {The study of neurologic disorders of spoken language is of course important to the improvement of clinical services for those with communicative impairments. But, in addition, the study of these disorders complements the study of normal speech to reach an understanding of the neural regulation of spoken language. Ideally, data on both normal and disordered speech will be embraced by common theoretical frameworks, so as to permit an effective consideration of these two sources of knowledge. Two such frameworks are discussed. One is an information processing perspective on utterance formulation and production. The other is a model of the neural regulation of voluntary movements. These frameworks are considered in relation to the disorders of conduction aphasia, apraxia of speech, and the dysarthrias associated with Parkinson's disease, cerebellar disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Finally, points of connection between the two theoretical frameworks are discussed.}}
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