Effects of speaking rate on voice-onset time in Thai, French, and English. Kessinger, R H and Blumstein, S. E Journal of Phonetics, 25(2):143-168.
abstract   bibtex   
This study investigated the effect of speaking rate on stop consonant production in three languages which have different phonetic categories of voicing. Voice-onset time (VOT) distributions and mean VOT values were examined for initial labial and alveolar stop consonants produced in CV(C) words in isolation and in context at both slow and fast rates of speech. Results revealed that the short lag category did not change as a function of speaking rate in any of the three languages examined, although VOT values for long lag (Thai and English) and pre-voiced (Thai and French) stop consonants were affected by changes in speaking rate. However, the shift of the long lag and pre-voiced categories toward the short lag VOT values in the fast rate condition resulted in little overlap between voicing categories. Implications of these results for the nature of phonetic categories are discussed. © 1997 Academic Press Limited.
@article{kessinger_effects_1997,
	Author = {Kessinger, R H and Blumstein, Sheila E},
	Date = {1997},
	Date-Modified = {2016-09-24 18:56:06 +0000},
	Journal = {Journal of Phonetics},
	Keywords = {consonants, contrastive, English, French, phonetics, prosody, segmental, speech rate, stops, temporal factors, Thai, VOT},
	Number = {2},
	Pages = {143-168},
	Title = {Effects of speaking rate on voice-onset time in Thai, French, and English},
	Volume = {25},
	Abstract = {This study investigated the effect of speaking rate on stop consonant production in three languages which have different phonetic categories of voicing. Voice-onset time (VOT) distributions and mean VOT values were examined for initial labial and alveolar stop consonants produced in CV(C) words in isolation and in context at both slow and fast rates of speech. Results revealed that the short lag category did not change as a function of speaking rate in any of the three languages examined, although VOT values for long lag (Thai and English) and pre-voiced (Thai and French) stop consonants were affected by changes in speaking rate. However, the shift of the long lag and pre-voiced categories toward the short lag VOT values in the fast rate condition resulted in little overlap between voicing categories. Implications of these results for the nature of phonetic categories are discussed. © 1997 Academic Press Limited.}}
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