The nature of the phonological disorder in conduction aphasia. Kohn, S E Brain and Language, 23(1):97-115.
doi  abstract   bibtex   
Sequences of attempts to name pictured objects were used to examine phonological dysfunction in three diagnostic subgroups of aphasia. A prevalence of "phonologically-oriented sequences" (i.e., those sequences that contained only attempts with a phonological resemblance to the target word) was found to be a diagnostic criterion for conduction aphasia. When compared to a group of Broca's (n = 7) and Wernicke's (n = 5) aphasics, all the conduction aphasics (n = 6) produced proportionately more of such phonologically-oriented sequences on a picture naming test. An examination of the phonologically-oriented sequences produced by the conduction aphasics indicates that speech production in conduction aphasia involves dysfunction at an early stage of sound-encoding. The theoretical implications of this view are discussed.
@article{kohn_nature_1984,
	Author = {Kohn, S E},
	Date = {1984},
	Date-Modified = {2017-04-19 08:04:07 +0000},
	Doi = {10.1016/0093-934X(84)90009-9},
	Issn = {0093934X},
	Journal = {Brain and Language},
	Keywords = {aphasia, clinical, clinical phonology, neurolinguistics},
	Number = {1},
	Pages = {97-115},
	Pmid = {6478196},
	Title = {The nature of the phonological disorder in conduction aphasia},
	Volume = {23},
	Abstract = {Sequences of attempts to name pictured objects were used to examine phonological dysfunction in three diagnostic subgroups of aphasia. A prevalence of "phonologically-oriented sequences" (i.e., those sequences that contained only attempts with a phonological resemblance to the target word) was found to be a diagnostic criterion for conduction aphasia. When compared to a group of Broca's (n = 7) and Wernicke's (n = 5) aphasics, all the conduction aphasics (n = 6) produced proportionately more of such phonologically-oriented sequences on a picture naming test. An examination of the phonologically-oriented sequences produced by the conduction aphasics indicates that speech production in conduction aphasia involves dysfunction at an early stage of sound-encoding. The theoretical implications of this view are discussed.},
	Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0093-934X(84)90009-9}}
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