The Transmission of Origen From Athanasius to the Cappadocians. Louth, A. In Heine, R. E. & Torjesen, K. J., editors, The Oxford Handbook of Origen, pages 429–444. Oxford University Press, 2022.
The Transmission of Origen From Athanasius to the Cappadocians [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Tracing Origen’s influence in the fourth century is constrained by the realization that our knowledge of Origen derives from the fourth century itself, thus already affected by its controversies. We have to project backwards from what we know of fourth-century theology to a presumed Origenian original: a hazardous task. Athanasius, in his Contra Gentes and De Incarnatione, manifests the influence of Origen primarily in his essentially contemplative understanding of what it is to be human. The principal evidence of Origenist influence in this century is the Origenian anthology, the Philokalia, arguably drawn up by Basil and Gregory of Nazianzus, which sets forth a Christocentric understanding of Scripture and the coinherence of divine providence and human free will. Gregory of Nyssa constitutes the most profound engagement with Origen, exploring the consequences of divine infinity and the essentially finite nature of the human, fulfilled in never-ending progress.
@incollection{louth_transmission_2022,
	title = {The {Transmission} of {Origen} {From} {Athanasius} to the {Cappadocians}},
	isbn = {978-0-19-968403-8},
	url = {https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199684038.013.25},
	abstract = {Tracing Origen’s influence in the fourth century is constrained by the realization that our knowledge of Origen derives from the fourth century itself, thus already affected by its controversies. We have to project backwards from what we know of fourth-century theology to a presumed Origenian original: a hazardous task. Athanasius, in his Contra Gentes and De Incarnatione, manifests the influence of Origen primarily in his essentially contemplative understanding of what it is to be human. The principal evidence of Origenist influence in this century is the Origenian anthology, the Philokalia, arguably drawn up by Basil and Gregory of Nazianzus, which sets forth a Christocentric understanding of Scripture and the coinherence of divine providence and human free will. Gregory of Nyssa constitutes the most profound engagement with Origen, exploring the consequences of divine infinity and the essentially finite nature of the human, fulfilled in never-ending progress.},
	urldate = {2023-05-30},
	booktitle = {The {Oxford} {Handbook} of {Origen}},
	publisher = {Oxford University Press},
	author = {Louth, Andrew},
	editor = {Heine, Ronald E. and Torjesen, Karen Jo},
	year = {2022},
	doi = {10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199684038.013.25},
	keywords = {Origen, Origène},
	pages = {429--444},
}

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