Engaging Practitioners in State School Improvement Initiatives. Massell, D.; Goertz, M. E.; and Barnes, C. A. Peabody Journal of Education, 90(1):113–127, January, 2015.
Engaging Practitioners in State School Improvement Initiatives [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
For most of U.S. history, local communities were the primary arbiters of school quality. Beginning in the mid-twentieth century, states began assuming more and more control over school standards and outcomes. The question we seek to answer is whether and the extent to which a particular kind of local voice—the voice of education practitioners—is represented in states' current, significant initiatives to improve low-performing schools. In the article, we focus on the role that practitioner knowledge played in the development of school improvement policies across three state education agencies. We draw on interviews, surveys, and document analyses collected for a larger exploratory study of knowledge utilization. Contrary to earlier research showing weak or uneven connections between state agencies and practitioners, we found that practitioner advice networks were generally stronger than states' research advice networks. We found ample illustration of staff using this advice to make sense of research for their own contexts, and for their own approaches to school improvement. Agencies formed ties to practitioners in districts and schools, in professional membership associations, within their own agencies, or in other agencies wrestling with similar problems. Who they turned to differed depending on earlier improvement policies and institutional histories.
@article{massell_engaging_2015,
	title = {Engaging {Practitioners} in {State} {School} {Improvement} {Initiatives}},
	volume = {90},
	issn = {0161-956X},
	url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0161956X.2015.988540},
	doi = {10.1080/0161956X.2015.988540},
	abstract = {For most of U.S. history, local communities were the primary arbiters of school quality. Beginning in the mid-twentieth century, states began assuming more and more control over school standards and outcomes. The question we seek to answer is whether and the extent to which a particular kind of local voice—the voice of education practitioners—is represented in states' current, significant initiatives to improve low-performing schools. In the article, we focus on the role that practitioner knowledge played in the development of school improvement policies across three state education agencies. We draw on interviews, surveys, and document analyses collected for a larger exploratory study of knowledge utilization. Contrary to earlier research showing weak or uneven connections between state agencies and practitioners, we found that practitioner advice networks were generally stronger than states' research advice networks. We found ample illustration of staff using this advice to make sense of research for their own contexts, and for their own approaches to school improvement. Agencies formed ties to practitioners in districts and schools, in professional membership associations, within their own agencies, or in other agencies wrestling with similar problems. Who they turned to differed depending on earlier improvement policies and institutional histories.},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2015-04-24},
	journal = {Peabody Journal of Education},
	author = {Massell, Diane and Goertz, Margaret E. and Barnes, Carol A.},
	month = jan,
	year = {2015},
	keywords = {Décideurs, Décideurs politiques, Déterminants, Stratégies, Éducation, Étude qualitative},
	pages = {113--127}
}
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