Identifying the Representational Structure of Affect Using fMRI. Mattek, A. M.; Burr, D. A.; Shin, J.; Whicker, C. L.; and Kim, M. J. Affective Science, 1(1):42–56, March, 2020.
Identifying the Representational Structure of Affect Using fMRI [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
The events we experience day to day can be described in terms of their affective quality: some are rewarding, others are upsetting, and still others are inconsequential. These natural distinctions reflect an underlying representational structure used to classify affective quality. In affective psychology, many experiments model this representational structure with two dimensions, using either the dimensions of valence and arousal, or alternatively, the dimensions of positivity and negativity. Using fMRI, we show that it is optimal to use all four dimensions to examine the data. Our findings include (1) a gradient representation of valence that is anatomically organized along the fusiform gyrus and (2) distinct sub-regions within bilateral amygdala that track arousal versus negativity. Importantly, these results would have remained concealed had either of the commonly used 2-dimensional approaches been adopted a priori, demonstrating the utility of our approach.
@article{mattek_identifying_2020,
	title = {Identifying the {Representational} {Structure} of {Affect} {Using} {fMRI}},
	volume = {1},
	issn = {2662-205X},
	url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s42761-020-00007-9},
	doi = {10.1007/s42761-020-00007-9},
	abstract = {The events we experience day to day can be described in terms of their affective quality: some are rewarding, others are upsetting, and still others are inconsequential. These natural distinctions reflect an underlying representational structure used to classify affective quality. In affective psychology, many experiments model this representational structure with two dimensions, using either the dimensions of valence and arousal, or alternatively, the dimensions of positivity and negativity. Using fMRI, we show that it is optimal to use all four dimensions to examine the data. Our findings include (1) a gradient representation of valence that is anatomically organized along the fusiform gyrus and (2) distinct sub-regions within bilateral amygdala that track arousal versus negativity. Importantly, these results would have remained concealed had either of the commonly used 2-dimensional approaches been adopted a priori, demonstrating the utility of our approach.},
	language = {en},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2020-12-23},
	journal = {Affective Science},
	author = {Mattek, Alison M. and Burr, Daisy A. and Shin, Jin and Whicker, Cady L. and Kim, M. Justin},
	month = mar,
	year = {2020},
	pages = {42--56},
}
Downloads: 0