Systemic Engagement: Universities as Partners in Systemic Approaches to Community Change. McNall, M. A.; Barnes-Najor, J. V.; Doberneck, D. M.; and Fitzgerald, H. E. Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 19(1):7–32, March, 2015.
Systemic Engagement: Universities as Partners in Systemic Approaches to Community Change [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
The most pressing social problems facing humanity in the 21st century are what systems theorist Russell Ackoff referred to as “messes”—complex dynamic systems of problems that interact and reinforce each other over time. In this article, the authors argue that the lack of progress in managing messes is in part due to the predominance of a university-driven isolated-impact approach to social problem solving. The authors suggest an alternative approach called systemic engagement (SE), which involves universities as partners in systemic approaches to community change. The six principles of SE are presented and illustrated with a case example. Barriers to SE are discussed, and strategies are proposed for increasing faculty use of this methodology. The promises and perils of SE as an alternative community-engaged approach to social problem solving are considered.
@article{mcnall_systemic_2015,
	title = {Systemic {Engagement}: {Universities} as {Partners} in {Systemic} {Approaches} to {Community} {Change}},
	volume = {19},
	copyright = {Authors who publish with this journal agree to the following terms:    Authors retain copyright and grant the journal right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a  Creative Commons Attribution License  that allows others to share the work with an acknowledgement of the work's authorship and initial publication in this journal.   Authors are able to enter into separate, additional contractual arrangements for the non-exclusive distribution of the journal's published version of the work (e.g., post it to an institutional repository or publish it in a book), with an acknowledgement of its initial publication in this journal.   Authors are permitted and encouraged to post their work online (e.g., in institutional repositories or on their website) prior to and during the submission process, as it can lead to productive exchanges, as well as earlier and greater citation of published work (See  The Effect of Open Access ).},
	issn = {1534-6102},
	shorttitle = {Systemic {Engagement}},
	url = {http://openjournals.libs.uga.edu/index.php/jheoe/article/view/1390},
	abstract = {The most pressing social problems facing humanity in the 21st century are what systems theorist Russell Ackoff referred to as “messes”—complex dynamic systems of problems that interact and reinforce each other over time. In this article, the authors argue that the lack of progress in managing messes is in part due to the predominance of a university-driven isolated-impact approach to social problem solving. The authors suggest an alternative approach called systemic engagement (SE), which involves universities as partners in systemic approaches to community change. The six principles of SE are presented and illustrated with a case example. Barriers to SE are discussed, and strategies are proposed for increasing faculty use of this methodology. The promises and perils of SE as an alternative community-engaged approach to social problem solving are considered.},
	language = {en},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2015-03-30},
	journal = {Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement},
	author = {McNall, Miles A. and Barnes-Najor, Jessica V. and Doberneck, Diane M. and Fitzgerald, Hiram E.},
	month = mar,
	year = {2015},
	keywords = {Article théorique, Clients et grand public, Déterminants, Organisations, Santé et services sociaux, Stratégies, Théories},
	pages = {7--32}
}
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