Healthy Canada by Design CLASP: Lessons learned from the first phase of an intersectoral, cross-provincial, built environment initiative. Miro, A.; Kishchuk, N. A.; Perrotta, K.; and Swinkels, H. M. Canadian Journal of Public Health = Revue Canadienne De Santé Publique, 106(1 Suppl 1):eS50–63, 2015.
Healthy Canada by Design CLASP: Lessons learned from the first phase of an intersectoral, cross-provincial, built environment initiative [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
OBJECTIVES: The Healthy Canada by Design (HCBD) CLASP (Coalitions Linking Action and Science for Prevention) Initiative promotes the building of communities that support health by 1) facilitating the integration of health evidence into built environment decision-making; 2) developing new, cross-sector collaboration models and tools; and 3) fostering a national community of practice. PARTICIPANTS: A coalition of public health professionals, researchers, professional planners and non-governmental organization (NGO) staff from across Canada developed, implemented and participated in the Initiative. SETTINGS: In the first phase, HCBD interventions took place for the most part in large urban and suburban settings in Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia. National knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) activities were delivered both locally and nationally. INTERVENTION: Project participants developed tools or processes for collaboration between the health and the community planning sectors. These were designed to increase the capacity of the health sector to influence decisions about land use and transportation planning. Tool or process development was accompanied by pilot testing, evaluation, and dissemination of findings and lessons learned. On a parallel track, NGOs involved with HCBD led national KTE interventions. OUTCOMES: The first phase of HCBD demonstrated the potential for public health organizations to influence the built environment determinants of cancer and chronic diseases. Public health authorities forged relationships with several organizations with a stake in built environment decisions, including municipal and regional planning departments, provincial governments, federal government agencies, researchers, community groups and NGOs. The Initiative accomplished the following: 1) created new relationships across sectors and across health authorities; 2) improved the knowledge and skills for influencing land use planning processes among public health professionals; 3) increased awareness of health evidence and intent to change practice among built environment decision-makers; and 4) facilitated inclusion of health considerations in local plans, policies and decisions. CONCLUSIONS: The first phase of HCBD engaged built environment stakeholders, including public health professionals, planners, researchers, community groups and NGOs, in ways that would be expected to influence health risk factors and population health outcomes in the long term.
@article{miro_healthy_2015,
	title = {Healthy {Canada} by {Design} {CLASP}: {Lessons} learned from the first phase of an intersectoral, cross-provincial, built environment initiative},
	volume = {106},
	issn = {1920-7476},
	shorttitle = {Healthy {Canada} by {Design} {CLASP}},
	url = {http://journal.cpha.ca/index.php/cjph/article/view/4555},
	abstract = {OBJECTIVES: The Healthy Canada by Design (HCBD) CLASP (Coalitions Linking Action and Science for Prevention) Initiative promotes the building of communities that support health by 1) facilitating the integration of health evidence into built environment decision-making; 2) developing new, cross-sector collaboration models and tools; and 3) fostering a national community of practice.
PARTICIPANTS: A coalition of public health professionals, researchers, professional planners and non-governmental organization (NGO) staff from across Canada developed, implemented and participated in the Initiative.
SETTINGS: In the first phase, HCBD interventions took place for the most part in large urban and suburban settings in Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia. National knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) activities were delivered both locally and nationally.
INTERVENTION: Project participants developed tools or processes for collaboration between the health and the community planning sectors. These were designed to increase the capacity of the health sector to influence decisions about land use and transportation planning. Tool or process development was accompanied by pilot testing, evaluation, and dissemination of findings and lessons learned. On a parallel track, NGOs involved with HCBD led national KTE interventions.
OUTCOMES: The first phase of HCBD demonstrated the potential for public health organizations to influence the built environment determinants of cancer and chronic diseases. Public health authorities forged relationships with several organizations with a stake in built environment decisions, including municipal and regional planning departments, provincial governments, federal government agencies, researchers, community groups and NGOs. The Initiative accomplished the following: 1) created new relationships across sectors and across health authorities; 2) improved the knowledge and skills for influencing land use planning processes among public health professionals; 3) increased awareness of health evidence and intent to change practice among built environment decision-makers; and 4) facilitated inclusion of health considerations in local plans, policies and decisions.
CONCLUSIONS: The first phase of HCBD engaged built environment stakeholders, including public health professionals, planners, researchers, community groups and NGOs, in ways that would be expected to influence health risk factors and population health outcomes in the long term.},
	language = {eng},
	number = {1 Suppl 1},
	journal = {Canadian Journal of Public Health = Revue Canadienne De Santé Publique},
	author = {Miro, Alice and Kishchuk, Natalie A. and Perrotta, Kim and Swinkels, Helena M.},
	year = {2015},
	pmid = {25955549},
	keywords = {Décideurs, Décideurs politiques, Gestionnaires et cadres, Impacts et effets, Modèles, Outils, Rapport, Santé publique, Stratégies},
	pages = {eS50--63}
}
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