A simple, effective enclosure with disposable coverings for inexpensive containment of aerosolized COVID viruses during tracheal intubation and extubation. Monroe, L. W.; Johnson, J. S.; Gutstein, H. B.; Lawrence, J. P.; Lejeune, K.; Sullivan, R. C.; and Jen, C. N. medRxiv, November, 2020. Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
A simple, effective enclosure with disposable coverings for inexpensive containment of aerosolized COVID viruses during tracheal intubation and extubation [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   3 downloads  
\textlessp\textgreaterBackground: SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) is a severe respiratory virus that can be transmitted through aerosol particles produced by coughing, talking, and breathing. Medical procedures used to treat severe cases such as tracheal intubation, extubation, and tracheal suctioning produce infectious aerosol particles. This presents significant risk for viral exposure of nearby healthcare workers during and following tracheal operations. This study looks at an enclosure to limit exposure for medical personnel to these particles. Methods: A low-cost plastic enclosure was designed to reduce aerosol spread and viral transmission during intubation and extubation procedures. The enclosure consists of clear polycarbonate for maximum visibility. Large side cutouts provide health care providers with ease of access to the patient. Aerosol particle instruments measured the aerosol containment efficacy after applying various types of plastic coverings to seal the side openings. The use of negative pressure was also tested. Results: The enclosure with 2 layers of plastic coverings sealing the side openings reduced total escaped particle number concentrations (diameter > 10 nm) by over 93% at 3 inches away from all openings. Concentration decay experiments indicated that the enclosure without active suction should be left on the patient for 15-20 minutes following a tracheal manipulation to allow sufficient time for >90% of aerosol particles to settle upon interior surfaces. This decreases to 5 minutes when 30 LPM suction is applied. Conclusions: This enclosure is an inexpensive, easily implemented additional layer of protection that can be used to reduce the risk of SARS-CoV-2 aerosol transmission between patients and healthcare workers.\textless/p\textgreater
@article{monroe_simple_2020,
	title = {A simple, effective enclosure with disposable coverings for inexpensive containment of aerosolized {COVID} viruses during tracheal intubation and extubation},
	copyright = {© 2020, Posted by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. This pre-print is available under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International), CC BY-NC-ND 4.0, as described at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/},
	url = {https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.11.23.20237255v1},
	doi = {10.1101/2020.11.23.20237255},
	abstract = {{\textless}p{\textgreater}Background: SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) is a severe respiratory virus that can be transmitted through aerosol particles produced by coughing, talking, and breathing. Medical procedures used to treat severe cases such as tracheal intubation, extubation, and tracheal suctioning produce infectious aerosol particles. This presents significant risk for viral exposure of nearby healthcare workers during and following tracheal operations. This study looks at an enclosure to limit exposure for medical personnel to these particles. Methods: A low-cost plastic enclosure was designed to reduce aerosol spread and viral transmission during intubation and extubation procedures. The enclosure consists of clear polycarbonate for maximum visibility. Large side cutouts provide health care providers with ease of access to the patient. Aerosol particle instruments measured the aerosol containment efficacy after applying various types of plastic coverings to seal the side openings. The use of negative pressure was also tested. Results: The enclosure with 2 layers of plastic coverings sealing the side openings reduced total escaped particle number concentrations (diameter \> 10 nm) by over 93\% at 3 inches away from all openings. Concentration decay experiments indicated that the enclosure without active suction should be left on the patient for 15-20 minutes following a tracheal manipulation to allow sufficient time for \>90\% of aerosol particles to settle upon interior surfaces. This decreases to 5 minutes when 30 LPM suction is applied. Conclusions: This enclosure is an inexpensive, easily implemented additional layer of protection that can be used to reduce the risk of SARS-CoV-2 aerosol transmission between patients and healthcare workers.{\textless}/p{\textgreater}},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2020-11-24},
	journal = {medRxiv},
	author = {Monroe, Luke W. and Johnson, Jack S. and Gutstein, Howard B. and Lawrence, John P. and Lejeune, Keith and Sullivan, Ryan C. and Jen, Coty N.},
	month = nov,
	year = {2020},
	note = {Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press},
	pages = {2020.11.23.20237255},
}
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