Creating Coexistence: Intergroup Contact and Soccer in Post-ISIS Iraq. Mousa, S. In Copenhagen, Denmark, 2020.
Creating Coexistence: Intergroup Contact and Soccer in Post-ISIS Iraq [pdf]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Can intergroup contact build social cohesion after war? I answer this question by randomly assigning Iraqi Christians displaced by ISIS either to an all-Christian soccer team or to a team mixed with Muslims. I find persistent changes to behaviors toward Muslim peers: Christians with Muslim teammates are more likely to sign up for a mixed soccer team in the future (12 pp., p \textless 0.08), vote for a Muslim player (not on their team) to receive a sportsmanship award (16 pp., p \textless 0.01), and train with Muslims six months after the intervention ends (34 pp., p \textless 0.01). Players on mixed teams are also more likely to believe that coexistence is possible (63 SDs., p \textless 0.01). These results seem to be driven by changing norms around social contact as well as a positive experience, with top-performing teams being more likely to patronize a restaurant in Muslim-dominated Mosul. Contact was less effective, however, at shifting generalized tolerance toward Muslim strangers. These findings point to the potential for meaningful social contact to build coexistence after conflict — even if underlying prejudice remains unchanged.
@inproceedings{mousa_creating_2020,
	address = {Copenhagen, Denmark},
	title = {Creating {Coexistence}: {Intergroup} {Contact} and {Soccer} in {Post}-{ISIS} {Iraq}},
	url = {https://www.poverty-action.org/sites/default/files/publications/Mousa.pdf},
	abstract = {Can intergroup contact build social cohesion after war? I answer this question by randomly assigning Iraqi Christians
displaced by ISIS either to an all-Christian soccer team or to a team mixed with Muslims. I find persistent changes to
behaviors toward Muslim peers: Christians with Muslim teammates are more likely to sign up for a mixed soccer team in
the future (12 pp., p {\textless} 0.08), vote for a Muslim player (not on their team) to receive a sportsmanship award (16 pp., p {\textless} 0.01),
and train with Muslims six months after the intervention ends (34 pp., p {\textless} 0.01). Players on mixed teams are also more
likely to believe that coexistence is possible (63 SDs., p {\textless} 0.01). These results seem to be driven by changing norms around
social contact as well as a positive experience, with top-performing teams being more likely to patronize a restaurant in
Muslim-dominated Mosul. Contact was less effective, however, at shifting generalized tolerance toward Muslim strangers.
These findings point to the potential for meaningful social contact to build coexistence after conflict — even if underlying
prejudice remains unchanged.},
	author = {Mousa, Salma},
	year = {2020},
	keywords = {IDPs, Intergroup contact, Iraq, Post-ISIS Iraq, Soccer}
}
Downloads: 0