Persistent digital divide in access to and use of the Internet as a resource for health information: Results from a California population-based study. Nguyen, A., Mosadeghi, S., & Almario, C., V. International Journal of Medical Informatics, 103:49-54, 2017.
Persistent digital divide in access to and use of the Internet as a resource for health information: Results from a California population-based study [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Objectives Access to the Internet has grown dramatically over the past two decades. Using data from a population-based survey, we aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of (i) access to the Internet, and (ii) use of the Internet to search for health information. Methods We analyzed data from the 2011–12 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) and included all individuals 18 years of age and older. Our outcomes were (i) prior use of the Internet, and (ii) use of the Internet to find health or medical information within the past year. We performed survey-weighted logistic regression models on our outcomes to adjust for potentially confounding demographic and socioeconomic factors. Results Our study included an unweighted and survey-weighted sample of 42,935 and 27,796,484 individuals, respectively. We found that 81.5% of the weighted sample reported having previously used the Internet. Among Internet users, 64.5% stated that they used the Internet within the past year to find health or medical information. Racial/ethnic minorities, older individuals, and those who lived in lower income households and rural areas were less likely to have access to and use the Internet to search for health information. Conversely, English-proficiency and increasing levels of education were positively associated with online health information-seeking. Conclusions We found that most Californians have access to and use the Internet to search for health information, but still noted a persistent digital divide. Interventions to narrow the divide are needed, otherwise this may lead to a continued widening of existing healthcare disparities.
@article{
 title = {Persistent digital divide in access to and use of the Internet as a resource for health information: Results from a California population-based study},
 type = {article},
 year = {2017},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Digital divide,Internet,Patient portals},
 pages = {49-54},
 volume = {103},
 websites = {https://ac-els-cdn-com.libproxy2.usc.edu/S1386505617300862/1-s2.0-S1386505617300862-main.pdf?_tid=976a385a-b84c-11e7-b93f-00000aab0f27&acdnat=1508802655_715c43730ce441306ece2288e83b3268},
 id = {02c579cb-279b-3918-9580-8ce5698e8996},
 created = {2017-12-22T17:40:15.978Z},
 accessed = {2017-10-23},
 file_attached = {false},
 profile_id = {b29b8212-e243-391a-9ac7-cf5e1615a27c},
 group_id = {e8a34f5c-64dc-3f7f-8db5-2c8388e9551e},
 last_modified = {2017-12-22T17:40:15.978Z},
 read = {true},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {true},
 hidden = {false},
 private_publication = {false},
 abstract = {Objectives Access to the Internet has grown dramatically over the past two decades. Using data from a population-based survey, we aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of (i) access to the Internet, and (ii) use of the Internet to search for health information. Methods We analyzed data from the 2011–12 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) and included all individuals 18 years of age and older. Our outcomes were (i) prior use of the Internet, and (ii) use of the Internet to find health or medical information within the past year. We performed survey-weighted logistic regression models on our outcomes to adjust for potentially confounding demographic and socioeconomic factors. Results Our study included an unweighted and survey-weighted sample of 42,935 and 27,796,484 individuals, respectively. We found that 81.5% of the weighted sample reported having previously used the Internet. Among Internet users, 64.5% stated that they used the Internet within the past year to find health or medical information. Racial/ethnic minorities, older individuals, and those who lived in lower income households and rural areas were less likely to have access to and use the Internet to search for health information. Conversely, English-proficiency and increasing levels of education were positively associated with online health information-seeking. Conclusions We found that most Californians have access to and use the Internet to search for health information, but still noted a persistent digital divide. Interventions to narrow the divide are needed, otherwise this may lead to a continued widening of existing healthcare disparities.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Nguyen, Amy and Mosadeghi, Sasan and Almario, Christopher V.},
 journal = {International Journal of Medical Informatics}
}
Downloads: 0