Fourth-Year Medical Student Opinions and Basic Knowledge Regarding the Field of Radiology. Prezzia, C., Vorona, G., & Greenspan, R. Academic Radiology, 20(3):272--283, March, 2013. 00000
Fourth-Year Medical Student Opinions and Basic Knowledge Regarding the Field of Radiology [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Rationale and Objectives This study evaluates the opinions and knowledge of fourth-year US medical students regarding radiology and analyzes the influence of a required or nonrequired radiology rotation as a reflection of the effectiveness of radiology medical student education. Methods and Materials Our institutional review board granted exempt status. An invitation e-mail was sent to 137 US medical schools. Upon receiving approval a second email was sent containing our voluntary anonymous online survey hyperlink to forward to their fourth-year class. Survey topics included demographics, radiology educational experiences, attitudes toward the field, and basic radiology knowledge. Responses were collected between August 4 and September 26, 2011. Results A total of 444 fourth-year medical students from 37 medical schools participated: 89% planned to enter a nonradiology specialty, 10.8% were required to take a dedicated radiology rotation, 34.9% completed one, 77% planned to complete one by graduation, 88.4% thought radiology often changes patient care or is at least as important as physical exam, 91.4% underestimated the cancer risk of an abdomen and pelvis computed tomography by at least one order of magnitude, and 72.9% by at least two orders. Seventy-seven percent had never heard of the American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria. Respondents underestimated the potential risks of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); with 58.3% aware intravenous gadolinium can cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and 79.4% aware of potential injury from metallic projectiles. 40.4% indicated that non-radiologist clinicians in specific medical specialties interpret their respective imaging studies at least as accurately as corresponding subspecialty radiologists. Other results include student opinions regarding teleradiology, radiologist lifestyle, and compensation. Conclusions Fourth-year medical students recognize the importance of radiology but are poorly informed regarding radiation safety, MRI safety, and ACR Appropriateness Criteria, despite 34.9% having a dedicated rotation. This highlights the need for adoption of the Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology curriculum.
@article{prezzia_fourth-year_2013,
	series = {Education {Issue}},
	title = {Fourth-{Year} {Medical} {Student} {Opinions} and {Basic} {Knowledge} {Regarding} the {Field} of {Radiology}},
	volume = {20},
	issn = {1076-6332},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1076633212005442},
	doi = {10.1016/j.acra.2012.10.004},
	abstract = {Rationale and Objectives
This study evaluates the opinions and knowledge of fourth-year US medical students regarding radiology and analyzes the influence of a required or nonrequired radiology rotation as a reflection of the effectiveness of radiology medical student education.
Methods and Materials
Our institutional review board granted exempt status. An invitation e-mail was sent to 137 US medical schools. Upon receiving approval a second email was sent containing our voluntary anonymous online survey hyperlink to forward to their fourth-year class. Survey topics included demographics, radiology educational experiences, attitudes toward the field, and basic radiology knowledge. Responses were collected between August 4 and September 26, 2011.
Results
A total of 444 fourth-year medical students from 37 medical schools participated: 89\% planned to enter a nonradiology specialty, 10.8\% were required to take a dedicated radiology rotation, 34.9\% completed one, 77\% planned to complete one by graduation, 88.4\% thought radiology often changes patient care or is at least as important as physical exam, 91.4\% underestimated the cancer risk of an abdomen and pelvis computed tomography by at least one order of magnitude, and 72.9\% by at least two orders. Seventy-seven percent had never heard of the American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria. Respondents underestimated the potential risks of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); with 58.3\% aware intravenous gadolinium can cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and 79.4\% aware of potential injury from metallic projectiles. 40.4\% indicated that non-radiologist clinicians in specific medical specialties interpret their respective imaging studies at least as accurately as corresponding subspecialty radiologists. Other results include student opinions regarding teleradiology, radiologist lifestyle, and compensation.
Conclusions
Fourth-year medical students recognize the importance of radiology but are poorly informed regarding radiation safety, MRI safety, and ACR Appropriateness Criteria, despite 34.9\% having a dedicated rotation. This highlights the need for adoption of the Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology curriculum.},
	number = {3},
	urldate = {2014-08-04TZ},
	journal = {Academic Radiology},
	author = {Prezzia, Charles and Vorona, Gregory and Greenspan, Robin},
	month = mar,
	year = {2013},
	note = {00000},
	keywords = {Student, education, opinions, survey},
	pages = {272--283}
}

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