Extending formant transitions may not improve aphasics' perception of stop consonant place of articulation. Riedel, K and Studdert-Kennedy, M Brain and Language, 24(2):223--232, 1985. bibtex: riedel_extending_1985
doi  abstract   bibtex   
Synthetic speech stimuli were used to investigate whether aphasics' ability to perceive stop consonant place of articulation was enhanced by the extension of initial formant transitions in CV syllables. Phoneme identification and discrimination tests were administered to 12 aphasic patients, 5 fluent and 7 nonfluent. There were no significant differences in performance due to the extended transitions, and no systematic pattern of performance due to aphasia type. In both groups, discrimination was generally high and significantly better than identification, demonstrating that auditory capacity was retained, while phonetic perception was impaired; this result is consistent with repeated demonstrations that auditory and phonetic processes may be dissociated in normal listeners. Moreover, significant rank order correlations between performances on the Token Test and on both perceptual tasks suggest that impairment on these tests may reflect a general cognitive rather than a language-specific deficit.
@article{riedel_extending_1985,
	Abstract = {Synthetic speech stimuli were used to investigate whether aphasics' ability to perceive stop consonant place of articulation was enhanced by the extension of initial formant transitions in CV syllables. Phoneme identification and discrimination tests were administered to 12 aphasic patients, 5 fluent and 7 nonfluent. There were no significant differences in performance due to the extended transitions, and no systematic pattern of performance due to aphasia type. In both groups, discrimination was generally high and significantly better than identification, demonstrating that auditory capacity was retained, while phonetic perception was impaired; this result is consistent with repeated demonstrations that auditory and phonetic processes may be dissociated in normal listeners. Moreover, significant rank order correlations between performances on the Token Test and on both perceptual tasks suggest that impairment on these tests may reflect a general cognitive rather than a language-specific deficit.},
	Author = {Riedel, K and Studdert-Kennedy, M},
	Doi = {10.1016/0093-934X(85)90132-4},
	Issn = {0093934X},
	Journal = {Brain and Language},
	Keywords = {aphasia, clinical, clinical phonetics, consonants, neurolinguistics, segmental, speech perception},
	Note = {bibtex: riedel\_extending\_1985},
	Number = {2},
	Pages = {223--232},
	Pmid = {3978404},
	Title = {Extending formant transitions may not improve aphasics' perception of stop consonant place of articulation},
	Volume = {24},
	Year = {1985},
	Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0093-934X(85)90132-4}}
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