Randomized Trial of a Literacy-Sensitive, Culturally Tailored Diabetes Self-Management Intervention for Low-Income Latinos Latinos en Control. Rosal, M., C., Ockene, I., S., Restrepo, A., White, M., J., Borg, A., Olendzki, B., Scavron, J., Candib, L., Welch, G., & Reed, G.
Randomized Trial of a Literacy-Sensitive, Culturally Tailored Diabetes Self-Management Intervention for Low-Income Latinos Latinos en Control [pdf]Paper  Randomized Trial of a Literacy-Sensitive, Culturally Tailored Diabetes Self-Management Intervention for Low-Income Latinos Latinos en Control [pdf]Website  abstract   bibtex   
OBJECTIVE—To test whether a theory-based, literacy, and culturally tailored self-management intervention, Latinos en Control, improves glycemic control among low-income Latinos with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A total of 252 patients recruited from com-munity health centers were randomized to the Latinos en Control intervention or to usual care. The primarily group-based intervention consisted of 12 weekly and 8 monthly sessions and targeted knowledge, attitudes, and self-management behaviors. The primary outcome was HbA 1c . Secondary outcomes included diet, physical activity, blood glucose self-monitoring, diabetes knowledge and self-efficacy, and other physiological factors (e.g., lipids, blood pressure, and weight). Measures were collected at baseline and at 4-and 12-month follow-up. Change in outcomes over time between the groups and the association between HbA 1c and possible medi-ators were estimated using mixed-effects models and an intention-to-treat approach. RESULTS—A significant difference in HbA 1c change between the groups was observed at 4 months (intervention 20.88 [21.15 to 20.60] versus control 20.35 [20.62 to 0.07], P , 0.01), although this difference decreased and lost statistical significance at 12 months (inter-vention 20.46 [20.77 to 20.13] versus control 20.20 [20.53 to 0.13], P = 0.293). The interven-tion resulted in significant change differences in diabetes knowledge at 12 months (P = 0.001), self-efficacy (P = 0.001), blood glucose self-monitoring (P = 0.02), and diet, including dietary quality (P = 0.01), kilocalories consumed (P , 0.001), percentage of fat (P = 0.003), and percentage of saturated fat (P = 0.04). These changes were in turn significantly associated with HbA 1c change at 12 months. CONCLUSIONS—Literacy-sensitive, culturally tailored interventions can improve diabetes control among low-income Latinos; however, strategies to sustain improvements are needed.
@article{
 title = {Randomized Trial of a Literacy-Sensitive, Culturally Tailored Diabetes Self-Management Intervention for Low-Income Latinos Latinos en Control},
 type = {article},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 websites = {http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/diacare/34/4/838.full.pdf},
 id = {95cc2be7-9459-3fed-aae8-3cd8795ac628},
 created = {2017-12-02T22:20:16.720Z},
 accessed = {2017-12-02},
 file_attached = {true},
 profile_id = {b29b8212-e243-391a-9ac7-cf5e1615a27c},
 group_id = {e8a34f5c-64dc-3f7f-8db5-2c8388e9551e},
 last_modified = {2017-12-02T22:20:16.822Z},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {false},
 hidden = {false},
 private_publication = {false},
 abstract = {OBJECTIVE—To test whether a theory-based, literacy, and culturally tailored self-management intervention, Latinos en Control, improves glycemic control among low-income Latinos with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A total of 252 patients recruited from com-munity health centers were randomized to the Latinos en Control intervention or to usual care. The primarily group-based intervention consisted of 12 weekly and 8 monthly sessions and targeted knowledge, attitudes, and self-management behaviors. The primary outcome was HbA 1c . Secondary outcomes included diet, physical activity, blood glucose self-monitoring, diabetes knowledge and self-efficacy, and other physiological factors (e.g., lipids, blood pressure, and weight). Measures were collected at baseline and at 4-and 12-month follow-up. Change in outcomes over time between the groups and the association between HbA 1c and possible medi-ators were estimated using mixed-effects models and an intention-to-treat approach. RESULTS—A significant difference in HbA 1c change between the groups was observed at 4 months (intervention 20.88 [21.15 to 20.60] versus control 20.35 [20.62 to 0.07], P , 0.01), although this difference decreased and lost statistical significance at 12 months (inter-vention 20.46 [20.77 to 20.13] versus control 20.20 [20.53 to 0.13], P = 0.293). The interven-tion resulted in significant change differences in diabetes knowledge at 12 months (P = 0.001), self-efficacy (P = 0.001), blood glucose self-monitoring (P = 0.02), and diet, including dietary quality (P = 0.01), kilocalories consumed (P , 0.001), percentage of fat (P = 0.003), and percentage of saturated fat (P = 0.04). These changes were in turn significantly associated with HbA 1c change at 12 months. CONCLUSIONS—Literacy-sensitive, culturally tailored interventions can improve diabetes control among low-income Latinos; however, strategies to sustain improvements are needed.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Rosal, Milagros C and Ockene, Ira S and Restrepo, Angela and White, Mary Jo and Borg, Amy and Olendzki, Barbara and Scavron, Jeffrey and Candib, Lucy and Welch, Garry and Reed, George}
}
Downloads: 0