Vineyard floor management affects soil, plant nutrition, and grape yield and quality. Smith, R., Bettiga, L., Cahn, P. D., Baumgartner, K., Jackson, L., & Bensen, T. California Agriculture, 62(4):184–190, October, 2008.
Vineyard floor management affects soil, plant nutrition, and grape yield and quality [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Management of the vineyard floor affects soil and crop productivity, as well as runoff and sediment that leave the vineyard. In Monterey County, weed control is typically conducted in a 4-foot-wide area under the vines, while cover crops are planted in the middles between vine rows. This 5-year multidisciplinary study in a low rainfall vineyard evaluated the impact of weed control strategies (cultivation, pre-emergence and post-emergence herbicides) in the vine rows, factorially arranged with three cover-crop treatments in the middles. We studied soil compaction, moisture and runoff; vine and soil nutrition; soil microbial biomass and mycorrhizae; and grape yield and quality. The late-maturing 'Trios 102' triticale used more water during the vine growing season than the earlier maturing 'Merced' rye. Cover crops increased organic matter and microbial biomass in the middles and reduced sediment loss. Weed control treatments did not affect crop yield or soil nutritional and microbiological parameters, but cultivation increased soil compaction at 4 to 7 inches deep. Weed control strategies and cover crops must be chosen carefully to maximize benefits and minimize negative environmental impacts.
@article{smith_vineyard_2008,
	title = {Vineyard floor management affects soil, plant nutrition, and grape yield and quality},
	volume = {62},
	issn = {0008-0845},
	url = {http://calag.ucanr.edu/Archive/?article=ca.v062n04p184},
	abstract = {Management of the vineyard floor affects soil and crop productivity, as well as runoff and sediment that leave the vineyard. In Monterey County, weed control is typically conducted in a 4-foot-wide area under the vines, while cover crops are planted in the middles between vine rows. This 5-year multidisciplinary study in a low rainfall vineyard evaluated the impact of weed control strategies (cultivation, pre-emergence and post-emergence herbicides) in the vine rows, factorially arranged with three cover-crop treatments in the middles. We studied soil compaction, moisture and runoff; vine and soil nutrition; soil microbial biomass and mycorrhizae; and grape yield and quality. The late-maturing 'Trios 102' triticale used more water during the vine growing season than the earlier maturing 'Merced' rye. Cover crops increased organic matter and microbial biomass in the middles and reduced sediment loss. Weed control treatments did not affect crop yield or soil nutritional and microbiological parameters, but cultivation increased soil compaction at 4 to 7 inches deep. Weed control strategies and cover crops must be chosen carefully to maximize benefits and minimize negative environmental impacts.},
	language = {English},
	number = {4},
	urldate = {2017-01-30TZ},
	journal = {California Agriculture},
	author = {Smith, R. and Bettiga, L. and Cahn, Ph D. and Baumgartner, K. and Jackson, L. and Bensen, T.},
	month = oct,
	year = {2008},
	pages = {184--190}
}

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