The role of acoustic cues in the development of (non-) target-like second-language prosodic representations. Tremblay, A. and Owens, N The Canadian Journal of Linguistics, 55(1):85-114.
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This study investigates the acquisition of English (primary) word stress by native speakers of Canadian French, with focus on the trochaic foot and the alignment of its head with heavy syllables. L2 learners and native English speakers produced disyllabic and trisyllabic nonsense nouns. The participants with consistent stress patterns were grouped according to their prosodic grammar, and their productions were analyzed acoustically. The results indicate that the L2 learners who failed to align the head of the trochaic foot with the heavy syllable realized stress with higher pitch. Conversely, the L2 learners who aligned the head of the trochaic foot with the heavy syllable realized non-initial stress by lengthening the syllable. Surprisingly, the native speakers produced higher pitch on the initial syllable irrespective of stress, and they used length to realize stress on the heavy syllable. These findings suggest that L2 learners may have reached different prosodic grammars as a result of attending to distinct acoustic cues to English stress.
@article{tremblay_role_2010,
	Author = {Tremblay, Annie and Owens, N},
	Date = {2010},
	Date-Modified = {2017-04-19 08:04:09 +0000},
	Doi = {10.1353/cjl.0.0067},
	Journal = {The Canadian Journal of Linguistics},
	Keywords = {acoustic phonetics, EFL, French, L2, lexical stress, phonetics, prosody},
	Number = {1},
	Pages = {85-114},
	Title = {The role of acoustic cues in the development of (non-) target-like second-language prosodic representations},
	Volume = {55},
	Abstract = {This study investigates the acquisition of English (primary) word stress by native speakers of Canadian French, with focus on the trochaic foot and the alignment of its head with heavy syllables. L2 learners and native English speakers produced disyllabic and trisyllabic nonsense nouns. The participants with consistent stress patterns were grouped according to their prosodic grammar, and their productions were analyzed acoustically. The results indicate that the L2 learners who failed to align the head of the trochaic foot with the heavy syllable realized stress with higher pitch. Conversely, the L2 learners who aligned the head of the trochaic foot with the heavy syllable realized non-initial stress by lengthening the syllable. Surprisingly, the native speakers produced higher pitch on the initial syllable irrespective of stress, and they used length to realize stress on the heavy syllable. These findings suggest that L2 learners may have reached different prosodic grammars as a result of attending to distinct acoustic cues to English stress.},
	Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/cjl.0.0067}}
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