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  Alim, S. (1)
Sami H. Alim. Hip Hop national language. In Language in the USA: Themes for the twenty-first century, pages 387–409. Cambridge University Press, .
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  Bailey, G. (2)
Guy Bailey; and Marvin Bassett. Invariant be in the Lower South. In Michael Montgomery; and Guy Bailey., editor(s), Language variety in the South: Perspectives in Black and White, pages 158–179. The University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa, AL, 1986.
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Guy Bailey; and Natalie Maynor. The present tense of be in White Folk speech in the Southern United States. English World-Wide, 6: 199–216. 1985.
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  Bassett, M. (1)
Guy Bailey; and Marvin Bassett. Invariant be in the Lower South. In Michael Montgomery; and Guy Bailey., editor(s), Language variety in the South: Perspectives in Black and White, pages 158–179. The University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa, AL, 1986.
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  Baugh, J. (1)
John Baugh. Black street speech: Its history, structure, and survival. of Texas Linguistics SeriesUniversity of Texas Press, Austin, 1983.
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  Brewer, J. (1)
Jeutonne P Brewer. Nonagreeing am and invariant be in early Black English. SECOL Bulletin, 3: 81–100. 1979.
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  Clarke, S. (2)
Sandra Clarke. The search for origins: Habitual aspect and Newfoundland Vernacular English. Journal of English Linguistics, 27(4): 328–340. December 1999.
The search for origins: Habitual aspect and Newfoundland Vernacular English [link]Paper   doi   link   bibtex   6 downloads  
Sandra Clarke. Newfoundland English: Morphology and syntax. In Edgar W. Schneider; and Edgar W. Schneider., editor(s), Varieties of English: The Americas and the Caribbean, volume 2, pages 492–509. De Gruyter, Berlin, 2008.
Newfoundland English: Morphology and syntax [link]Paper   link   bibtex   7 downloads  
  Cohen, P. (1)
William Labov; Paul Cohen; Clarence Robins; and John Lewis. A study of the non-standard English of Negro and Puerto Rican speakers in New York City. Vol. 1: Phonological and grammatical analysis. Technical Report CRP-3288, Columbia University, New York, 1968.
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  Dayton, E. (1)
Elizabeth Dayton. Grammatical categories of the verb in African-American Vernacular English. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Pennsylvania, January 1996.
Grammatical categories of the verb in African-American Vernacular English [link]Paper   link   bibtex   5 downloads  
  Dunlap, H. (1)
Howard G Dunlap. Social aspects of a verbal form: native Atlanta fifth-grade speech - the present tense of be. Ph.D. Thesis, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 1973.
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  Fasold, R. (2)
Ralph W. Fasold. Tense and the form be in Black English. Language, 45(4): 763–776. 1969.
Tense and the form be in Black English [link]Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract   5 downloads  
Ralph W. Fasold. Tense marking in Black English: A linguistic and social analysis. of Urban language seriesCenter for Applied Linguistics, Arlington, VA, 1972.
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  Green, L. (3)
Lisa Green. Aspectual be-type constructions and coercion in African American English. Natural Language Semantics, 8(1): 1–25. 2000.
Aspectual be-type constructions and coercion in African American English [link]Paper   link   bibtex   abstract   13 downloads  
Lisa J. Green. Language and the African American child. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2011.
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Lisa J. Green. African American English: A linguistic introduction. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2002.
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  Harris, A. (1)
Alysia Nicole Harris. The non-aspectual meaning of African American English 'aspect' markers: A grammar for emotion and expectation. Ph.D. Thesis, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 2016.
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  Harris, J. (2)
John Harris. The underlying non-identity of English dialects: A look at the Hiberno-English verb phrase. Belfast working papers in language and linguistics, 6: 1–36. 1982.
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John Harris. Expanding the superstrate: habitual aspect markers in Atlantic Englishes. Sheffield Working Papers in Linguistics, 2: 72–97. 1985.
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  Henry, A. (1)
Alison Henry. Belfast English and standard English: Dialect variation and parameter setting. of Oxford studies in comparative syntaxOxford University Press, New York, 1995.
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  Hill, A. (1)
Archibald A. Hill. The Habituative Aspect of Verbs in \Black English, Irish English, and Standard English\. American Speech, 50(3/4): 323–324. 1975.
The Habituative Aspect of Verbs in \Black English, Irish English, and Standard English\ [link]Paper   doi   link   bibtex   1 download  
  Jones, T. (1)
Taylor Jones. Toward a Description of African American Vernacular English Dialect Regions Using “Black Twitter”. American Speech, 90(4): 403–440. November 2015.
Toward a Description of African American Vernacular English Dialect Regions Using “Black Twitter” [link]Paper   doi   link   bibtex   3 downloads  
  Jones-Jackson, P. (1)
Patricia Jones-Jackson. When roots die: Endangered traditions on the Sea Islands. University of Georgia Press, Athens, GA, 1987.
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  Kallen, J. (1)
Jeffrey L. Kallen. The co-occurrence of do and be in Hiberno-English. In John Harris; David Little; and Singleton., editor(s), Perspectives on the English language in Ireland. Center for Language and Communication Studies, Trinity College Dublin, 1986.
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  Labov, W. (2)
William Labov. Coexistent systems in African-American vernacular English. In Salikoko S. Mufwene; John R. Rickford; Guy Bailey; and John Baugh., editor(s), African-American English: Structure, history, and use, pages 110–153. Routledge, London, 1998.
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William Labov; Paul Cohen; Clarence Robins; and John Lewis. A study of the non-standard English of Negro and Puerto Rican speakers in New York City. Vol. 1: Phonological and grammatical analysis. Technical Report CRP-3288, Columbia University, New York, 1968.
link   bibtex  
  Lewis, J. (1)
William Labov; Paul Cohen; Clarence Robins; and John Lewis. A study of the non-standard English of Negro and Puerto Rican speakers in New York City. Vol. 1: Phonological and grammatical analysis. Technical Report CRP-3288, Columbia University, New York, 1968.
link   bibtex  
  Loflin, M. (1)
Marvin D. Loflin. A note on the deep structure of non-standard English in Washington, D.C. Glossa, 1: 26–37. 1967.
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  Maynor, N. (1)
Guy Bailey; and Natalie Maynor. The present tense of be in White Folk speech in the Southern United States. English World-Wide, 6: 199–216. 1985.
link   bibtex  
  Mishoe, M. (1)
Michael Montgomery; and Margaret Mishoe. "He Bes Took Up with a Yankee Girl and Moved Up There to New York": The Verb bes in the Carolinas and Its History. American Speech, 74(3): 240–281. 1999.
"He Bes Took Up with a Yankee Girl and Moved Up There to New York": The Verb bes in the Carolinas and Its History [link]Paper   link   bibtex   1 download  
  Montgomery, M. (1)
Michael Montgomery; and Margaret Mishoe. "He Bes Took Up with a Yankee Girl and Moved Up There to New York": The Verb bes in the Carolinas and Its History. American Speech, 74(3): 240–281. 1999.
"He Bes Took Up with a Yankee Girl and Moved Up There to New York": The Verb bes in the Carolinas and Its History [link]Paper   link   bibtex   1 download  
  Mufwene, S. (3)
Salikoko Mufwene. Gullah. In Bernd Kortmann; and Kerstin Lunkenheimer., editor(s), The electronic world atlas of varieties of English. Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, 2013.
Gullah [link]Paper   link   bibtex  
Salikoko S. Mufwene. Gullah: morphology and syntax. In Edgar W. Schneider., editor(s), Varieties of English: The Americas and the Caribbean, volume 2, pages 551–571. Mouton de Gruyter, The Hague, 2008.
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Salikoko S. Mufwene. Gullah's development: Myth and sociohistorical evidence. In Cynthia Bernstein; Thomas Nunnally; and Sabino., editor(s), Language variety in the South revisited, pages 113–122. The University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa, AL, 1997.
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  Rickford, J. (3)
John R. Rickford. Social contact and linguistic diffusion: Hiberno-English and New World Black English. Language, 62(2): 245–289. 1986.
Social contact and linguistic diffusion: Hiberno-English and New World Black English [link]Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract   2 downloads  
John R. Rickford. Number delimitation in Gullah: A response to Mufwene. American Speech, 65: 148–163. 1990.
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John R. Rickford. Invariant be in the Lower South. In Michael Montgomery; and Guy Bailey., editor(s), Language variety in the South: Perspectives in Black and White, pages 38–62. The University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa, AL, 1986.
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  Robins, C. (1)
William Labov; Paul Cohen; Clarence Robins; and John Lewis. A study of the non-standard English of Negro and Puerto Rican speakers in New York City. Vol. 1: Phonological and grammatical analysis. Technical Report CRP-3288, Columbia University, New York, 1968.
link   bibtex  
  Weldon, T. (1)
Tracy L. Weldon. Gullah Gullah islands (Sea Island, SC, GA). In Walt Wolfram; and Ben Ward., editor(s), American voices: How dialects differ from coast to coast, pages 178–182. Blackwell, Malden, MA, 2006.
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  Wolfram, W. (1)
Walt Wolfram. A sociolinguistic description of Detroit Negro speech. Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, D.C., 1969.
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