Aspectual be-type constructions and coercion in African American English. Green, L. Natural Language Semantics, 8(1):1–25, 2000.
Aspectual be-type constructions and coercion in African American English [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
This paper examines aspectual be—type constructions in African American English. These constructions receive a habitual interpretation, but they are distinguished from simple tense generics in that they are not ambiguous between generic/habitual and capacity readings. The analysis proposed to account for these constructions is one in which aspectual be neutralizes the distinction between stage- and individual-level predicates. Following Kratzer (1995), I assume that stage-level predicates have a separate event argument associated with them, but individual-level predicates do not. Aspectual be forces individual-level predicates to take an eventuality argument which coerces them into stage-level predicates. The logical representations of these constructions are given a tripartite structure in which a habitual operator binds variables ranging over eventualities. The analysis can be extended to account for constructions in which permanently stable entities indicated by bare plural subjects occur with be—type predicates. The solution proposed here accounts for some well-known properties of aspectual be that have not been discussed in the literature.
@article{green_aspectual_2000,
	title = {Aspectual be-type constructions and coercion in {African} {American} {English}},
	volume = {8},
	issn = {0925-854X},
	url = {http://www.jstor.org/stable/23748550},
	abstract = {This paper examines aspectual be—type constructions in African American English. These constructions receive a habitual interpretation, but they are distinguished from simple tense generics in that they are not ambiguous between generic/habitual and capacity readings. The analysis proposed to account for these constructions is one in which aspectual be neutralizes the distinction between stage- and individual-level predicates. Following Kratzer (1995), I assume that stage-level predicates have a separate event argument associated with them, but individual-level predicates do not. Aspectual be forces individual-level predicates to take an eventuality argument which coerces them into stage-level predicates. The logical representations of these constructions are given a tripartite structure in which a habitual operator binds variables ranging over eventualities. The analysis can be extended to account for constructions in which permanently stable entities indicated by bare plural subjects occur with be—type predicates. The solution proposed here accounts for some well-known properties of aspectual be that have not been discussed in the literature.},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2017-04-06},
	journal = {Natural Language Semantics},
	author = {Green, Lisa},
	year = {2000},
	keywords = {Stressed BIN},
	pages = {1--25},
}

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