Assessment of technical skills transfer from the bench training model to the human model. Anastakis, D. J; Regehr, G.; Reznick, R. K; Cusimano, M.; Murnaghan, J.; Brown, M.; and Hutchison, C. The American Journal of Surgery, 177(2):167--170, 1999.
Assessment of technical skills transfer from the bench training model to the human model [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Background: This study examines whether technical skills learned on a bench model are transferable to the human cadaver model. Methods: Twenty-three first-year residents were randomly assigned to three groups receiving teaching on six procedures. For each procedure, one group received training on a cadaver model, one received training on a bench model, and one learned independently from a prepared text. Following training, all residents were assessed on their ability to perform the six procedures. Results: Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant effect of training modality for both checklist scores (F2,44 = 3.49, P <0.05) and global scores (F2,44 = 7.48, P <0.01). Post-hoc tests indicated that both bench and cadaver training were superior to text learning and that bench and cadaver training were equivalent. Conclusions: Training on a bench model transfers well to the human model, suggesting strong potential for transfer to the operating room.
@article{anastakis_assessment_1999,
	title = {Assessment of technical skills transfer from the bench training model to the human model},
	volume = {177},
	issn = {0002-9610},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0002961098003274},
	doi = {10.1016/S0002-9610(98)00327-4},
	abstract = {Background: This study examines whether technical skills learned on a bench model are transferable to the human cadaver model. Methods: Twenty-three first-year residents were randomly assigned to three groups receiving teaching on six procedures. For each procedure, one group received training on a cadaver model, one received training on a bench model, and one learned independently from a prepared text. Following training, all residents were assessed on their ability to perform the six procedures. Results: Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant effect of training modality for both checklist scores (F2,44 = 3.49, P \&lt;0.05) and global scores (F2,44 = 7.48, P \&lt;0.01). Post-hoc tests indicated that both bench and cadaver training were superior to text learning and that bench and cadaver training were equivalent. Conclusions: Training on a bench model transfers well to the human model, suggesting strong potential for transfer to the operating room.},
	number = {2},
	urldate = {2013-02-19TZ},
	journal = {The American Journal of Surgery},
	author = {Anastakis, Dimitri J and Regehr, Glenn and Reznick, Richard K and Cusimano, Michael and Murnaghan, John and Brown, Mitchell and Hutchison, Carol},
	year = {1999},
	pages = {167--170}
}
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