Effects of Tree Species on Understory Vegetation and Environmental Conditions in Temperate Forests. Augusto, L., Dupouey, J., & Ranger, J. Annals of Forest Science, 60(8):823–831, December, 2003.
doi  abstract   bibtex   
The objective of this study was to compare the impact of six tree species on vegetation and soil. Eighty stands growing side by side, and of different dominant species, were selected in 26 locations. Within each location the stands had the same soil condition, landscape position and previous land-use history. Ground vegetation and soil were sampled in each stand. The tree species were: Norway spruce (Picea abies Karsten.), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco), silver fir (Abies alba Miller), European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and oaks (Quercus robur L., Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.). The geographic and geological characteristics of sites influenced the vegetation and the soil chemistry more than the tree species did. Forest management influenced the ground flora more than the tree species did. Number of species and equitability differed little with tree species. The ground flora under Norway spruce included more mosses than under the other trees species except silver fir. The ground flora under Norway spruce was more typical of oligotrophic and acidic conditions than the flora under European beech. Soils under coniferous species, especially Norway spruce, were more acidic and had higher concentrations of aluminium than soils under hardwoods. The effect of tree species on soils was greatest in the topsoil (0-10 cm).
@article{augustoEffectsTreeSpecies2003,
  title = {Effects of Tree Species on Understory Vegetation and Environmental Conditions in Temperate Forests},
  author = {Augusto, Laurent and Dupouey, Jean-Luc and Ranger, Jacques},
  year = {2003},
  month = dec,
  volume = {60},
  pages = {823--831},
  issn = {1286-4560},
  doi = {10.1051/forest:2003077},
  abstract = {The objective of this study was to compare the impact of six tree species on vegetation and soil. Eighty stands growing side by side, and of different dominant species, were selected in 26 locations. Within each location the stands had the same soil condition, landscape position and previous land-use history. Ground vegetation and soil were sampled in each stand. The tree species were: Norway spruce (Picea abies Karsten.), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco), silver fir (Abies alba Miller), European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and oaks (Quercus robur L., Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.). The geographic and geological characteristics of sites influenced the vegetation and the soil chemistry more than the tree species did. Forest management influenced the ground flora more than the tree species did. Number of species and equitability differed little with tree species. The ground flora under Norway spruce included more mosses than under the other trees species except silver fir. The ground flora under Norway spruce was more typical of oligotrophic and acidic conditions than the flora under European beech. Soils under coniferous species, especially Norway spruce, were more acidic and had higher concentrations of aluminium than soils under hardwoods. The effect of tree species on soils was greatest in the topsoil (0-10 cm).},
  journal = {Annals of Forest Science},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-12607336,abies-alba,fagus-sylvatica,forest-management,forest-resources,ground-vegetation,picea-abies,pinus-sylvestris,pseudotsuga-menziesii,quercus-petraea,quercus-robur,soil-resources},
  lccn = {INRMM-MiD:c-12607336},
  number = {8}
}

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