Advancing Risk Assessment Models for Invasive Alien Species in the Food Chain: Contending with Climate Change, Economics and Uncertainty. Baker, R.; Koch, F. H.; Kriticos, D. J.; Rafoss, T.; Venette, R. C.; and van der Werf, W., editors .
Advancing Risk Assessment Models for Invasive Alien Species in the Food Chain: Contending with Climate Change, Economics and Uncertainty [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
[Preface] Invasive alien species are widely recognized as a threat to the sustainability of natural resources and agricultural production. Global trade frequently moves pathogens and pests from their native range to new areas where they can become problematic. Insects and diseases initially associated with agriculture can become problematic in natural settings. Biosecurity efforts to protect agriculture and natural resources from new pests depend on accurate forecasts of where new species might arrive, establish, spread and have the greatest impact. This workshop focus on new strategies to improve these forecasts and thereby improve efforts to exclude high-risk pests and diseases, detect recent invaders should an incursion occur, and contain or eradicate biological threats before impacts are widespread. Better pest risk models and maps enable improved plant protection strategies that place greater emphasis on prevention and rely less on reactive control approaches. Pest risk maps are foundational to policy decisions regarding domestic biosecurity and international trade in agro-food and forestry. While the International Plant Protection Convention provides general guidelines for the conduct of pest risk analysis, few guidance documents exist to describe the details of developing, verifying, and validating models to estimate pest risk and represent uncertainty. The European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization and the Australian CRC for Plant Biosecurity consider such documents a critical need and have advocated for their development. Further, the US Department of Agriculture - Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Biosecurity Australia, New Zealand Biosecuity and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency recognize the need for new methods to conduct spatially explicit pest risk assessments. This workshop and resulting products will directly address these needs. Recent invasions of Europe by corn rootworm, North America by spotted wing drosophila, and Australia by myrtle rust continue to illustrate the strong negative impacts invasive alien species can have on agriculture, forestry, and the people who depend on those systems for their economic livelihood. International trade in plants and plant products provides numerous opportunities for the introduction of new pests and diseases. Biosecurity efforts to prevent such pests from entering, spreading, or having widespread impacts depend on reliable forecasts of which species are most threatening and where they pose the greatest risk. This workshop provide new approaches and refine exsiting tools to make these forecasts. Invasive alien species are an international problem and require a coordinated international effort to address.
@collection{bakerAdvancingRiskAssessment2012,
  title = {Advancing Risk Assessment Models for Invasive Alien Species in the Food Chain: Contending with Climate Change, Economics and Uncertainty},
  editor = {Baker, Richard and Koch, Frank H. and Kriticos, Darren J. and Rafoss, Trond and Venette, Rob C. and van der Werf, Wopke},
  date = {2012},
  volume = {7},
  publisher = {{Bioforsk}},
  location = {{Frederik A. Dahls vei 20, 1432 Ås, Norway}},
  issn = {0809-8662},
  url = {http://www.worldcat.org/isbn/9788217009573},
  abstract = {[Preface] Invasive alien species are widely recognized as a threat to the sustainability of natural resources and agricultural production. Global trade frequently moves pathogens and pests from their native range to new areas where they can become problematic. Insects and diseases initially associated with agriculture can become problematic in natural settings. Biosecurity efforts to protect agriculture and natural resources from new pests depend on accurate forecasts of where new species might arrive, establish, spread and have the greatest impact. This workshop focus on new strategies to improve these forecasts and thereby improve efforts to exclude high-risk pests and diseases, detect recent invaders should an incursion occur, and contain or eradicate biological threats before impacts are widespread. Better pest risk models and maps enable improved plant protection strategies that place greater emphasis on prevention and rely less on reactive control approaches. Pest risk maps are foundational to policy decisions regarding domestic biosecurity and international trade in agro-food and forestry. While the International Plant Protection Convention provides general guidelines for the conduct of pest risk analysis, few guidance documents exist to describe the details of developing, verifying, and validating models to estimate pest risk and represent uncertainty. The European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization and the Australian CRC for Plant Biosecurity consider such documents a critical need and have advocated for their development. Further, the US Department of Agriculture - Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Biosecurity Australia, New Zealand Biosecuity and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency recognize the need for new methods to conduct spatially explicit pest risk assessments. This workshop and resulting products will directly address these needs. Recent invasions of Europe by corn rootworm, North America by spotted wing drosophila, and Australia by myrtle rust continue to illustrate the strong negative impacts invasive alien species can have on agriculture, forestry, and the people who depend on those systems for their economic livelihood. International trade in plants and plant products provides numerous opportunities for the introduction of new pests and diseases. Biosecurity efforts to prevent such pests from entering, spreading, or having widespread impacts depend on reliable forecasts of which species are most threatening and where they pose the greatest risk. This workshop provide new approaches and refine exsiting tools to make these forecasts. Invasive alien species are an international problem and require a coordinated international effort to address.},
  isbn = {978-82-17-00957-3},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-11729546,assessment,biodiversity,biodiversity-impacts,biosecurity,forest-pests,forest-resources,global-scale,integration-techniques,plant-pests,risk-assessment,science-policy-interface,scientific-communication,species-distribution},
  number = {10},
  options = {useprefix=true},
  series = {Bioforsk {{FOKUS}}}
}
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