Fire and restoration of piñon–juniper woodlands in the western United States: a review. Baker, W. L. & Shinneman, D. J. Forest Ecology and Management, 189(1):1–21, February, 2004.
Fire and restoration of piñon–juniper woodlands in the western United States: a review [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Piñons and junipers, that dominate many semi-arid landscapes in the western United States, have invaded some sagebrush and grassland areas and possibly increased in density since EuroAmerican settlement. Exclusion of fire by livestock grazing and intentional suppression is thought to have been a cause of these changes. National assessments suggest that many woodlands have missed one or more low-severity surface fires and are thus in poor condition, requiring restoration. We undertook a systematic review of seven questions about fire history, fire severity, and the role of fire in these woodlands to evaluate the scientific basis for the national assessment. First, unless piñons and junipers record fire by means of fire scars, it will be difficult to reconstruct fire history. Evidence suggests that most species of piñons and junipers can record fire by means of scars, but scars may be uncommon or absent in some cases and common in others. This variability in scarring has competing explanations that are poorly substantiated. Second, evidence exists for at least three modes of low-severity surface fires in these woodlands: (1) spreading surface fires, (2) patchy surface fires of small extent, and (3) an absence or near absence of surface fires. Methodological problems limit our ability to assess how common each mode is, but spreading, low-severity surface fires were likely not common. Third, there are no reliable estimates of mean fire intervals for low-severity surface fires in these woodlands because of methodological problems. Fourth, fires can kill small trees in true savannas and grasslands, helping to maintain a low tree density, but in most piñon–juniper woodlands low-severity surface fires do not consistently lower tree density and may become high-severity fires. Fifth, nearly all observed fires since EuroAmerican settlement in these woodlands were high-severity fires. In only two studies is there sufficient information to allow a conclusion about whether high-severity fires have or have not increased since settlement, and in these cases the authors conclude they have not. Sixth, the fire rotation for high-severity fires is estimated in only two studies, 400 years in one case, 480 years in the other. Finally, fires may in some cases burn with mixed severity. In conclusion, national fire plans and assessments of the condition and health of piñon–juniper woodlands in the western United States are based on premature and likely incorrect conclusions about the natural fire regime in piñon–juniper woodlands. Local research is essential, at the present time, if effective, scientifically based restoration prescriptions are to be derived.
@article{baker_fire_2004,
	title = {Fire and restoration of piñon–juniper woodlands in the western {United} {States}: a review},
	volume = {189},
	issn = {0378-1127},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112703004420},
	doi = {10.1016/j.foreco.2003.09.006},
	abstract = {Piñons and junipers, that dominate many semi-arid landscapes in the western United States, have invaded some sagebrush and grassland areas and possibly increased in density since EuroAmerican settlement. Exclusion of fire by livestock grazing and intentional suppression is thought to have been a cause of these changes. National assessments suggest that many woodlands have missed one or more low-severity surface fires and are thus in poor condition, requiring restoration. We undertook a systematic review of seven questions about fire history, fire severity, and the role of fire in these woodlands to evaluate the scientific basis for the national assessment. First, unless piñons and junipers record fire by means of fire scars, it will be difficult to reconstruct fire history. Evidence suggests that most species of piñons and junipers can record fire by means of scars, but scars may be uncommon or absent in some cases and common in others. This variability in scarring has competing explanations that are poorly substantiated. Second, evidence exists for at least three modes of low-severity surface fires in these woodlands: (1) spreading surface fires, (2) patchy surface fires of small extent, and (3) an absence or near absence of surface fires. Methodological problems limit our ability to assess how common each mode is, but spreading, low-severity surface fires were likely not common. Third, there are no reliable estimates of mean fire intervals for low-severity surface fires in these woodlands because of methodological problems. Fourth, fires can kill small trees in true savannas and grasslands, helping to maintain a low tree density, but in most piñon–juniper woodlands low-severity surface fires do not consistently lower tree density and may become high-severity fires. Fifth, nearly all observed fires since EuroAmerican settlement in these woodlands were high-severity fires. In only two studies is there sufficient information to allow a conclusion about whether high-severity fires have or have not increased since settlement, and in these cases the authors conclude they have not. Sixth, the fire rotation for high-severity fires is estimated in only two studies, 400 years in one case, 480 years in the other. Finally, fires may in some cases burn with mixed severity. In conclusion, national fire plans and assessments of the condition and health of piñon–juniper woodlands in the western United States are based on premature and likely incorrect conclusions about the natural fire regime in piñon–juniper woodlands. Local research is essential, at the present time, if effective, scientifically based restoration prescriptions are to be derived.},
	number = {1},
	journal = {Forest Ecology and Management},
	author = {Baker, William L. and Shinneman, Douglas J.},
	month = feb,
	year = {2004},
	keywords = {Ecosystem health, Fire history, Piñon–juniper, Restoration, Western US, Woodland},
	pages = {1--21},
}

Downloads: 0