The International Plant Sentinel Network: A Tool for Regional and National Plant Protection Organizations. Barham, E.; Sharrock, S.; Lane, C.; and Baker, R. 46(1):156–162.
The International Plant Sentinel Network: A Tool for Regional and National Plant Protection Organizations [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
[Excerpt:Introduction] A 2011 global survey of botanic gardens and arboreta, which included 204 respondents from 146 institutes, revealed that the botanic garden community has the potential to play a significant role in safeguarding plant health. However, responding institutes cited a lack of available training, resources and coordination to support any such work (Kramer & Hird 2011). Since its launch in November 2013, the International Plant Sentinel Network (IPSN) has been working to provide this support and illustrate the usefulness of such a global network to those working within plant health. The IPSN's ultimate aim is to provide an early warning system for new and emerging pest and pathogen risks. [] The IPSN is a developing network of botanic gardens, arboreta, National Plant Protection Organizations (NPPOs) and plant health scientists. Funded through EUPHRESCO (EUropean PHytosanitary RESearch COordination) Phytosanitary ERA-Net, the project is now coming to the end of its initial 3 years. During this time, the IPSN has worked to promote engagement, increase awareness and provide the resources to support gardens in carrying out plant health research. The next phase of the IPSN will be to coordinate and facilitate sentinel research projects around the world, working in close collaboration with gardens, NPPOs and scientists. In this way, valuable information will be collected in botanic gardens to aid plant health, for example for pest risk analysis (PRA) and other methods of assessing risk. [] [...] [IPSN participation and coordination] In the UK the EUPHRESCO project has been funded by the UK's Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) and led by FERA, with CABI-UK and Forest Research (UK). Other project partners are the Julius Kühn-Institut (Germany), the Plant Protection Services (Netherlands) and the Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest Systems, University of Tuscia (Italy). The network is, and will continue to be, coordinated by Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI). [] BGCI is an international consortium of botanic gardens and arboreta dedicated to conserving global plant diversity. The organization, which was established in 1987, sits at the heart of over 3000 gardens worldwide and has much experience coordinating and supporting the work of these institutes. [...] [] [...] [Conclusions] Sentinel research can provide scientists, RPPOs and NPPOs with important information required for making statutory decisions and developing management programmes for damaging plant pests and diseases. Botanic gardens and arboreta provide unique resources in which to carry out this research, and have in the past demonstrated on a small scale the potential role they can play. However, providing support and coordination on a global level can help to realize their true worth to plant health. In the last 3 years the IPSN has developed many of the tools required to engage and support the botanic garden community in this area. The project has raised awareness and understanding around the world, and developed a network of interested and willing individual and institutional participants. The next step of the IPSN will be to facilitate research and provide meaningful and valuable data to NPPOs and RPPOS across the world. To do this, the IPSN needs engagement and support from such government organizations, both financial and in kind. The ultimate goal will be to create a sustainable network, coordinated by BGCI, supported by NPPOs, RPPOs and plant health scientists, but led by the gardens themselves.
@article{barhamInternationalPlantSentinel2016,
  title = {The {{International Plant Sentinel Network}}: A Tool for Regional and National Plant Protection Organizations},
  author = {Barham, E. and Sharrock, S. and Lane, C. and Baker, R.},
  date = {2016-04},
  journaltitle = {EPPO Bulletin},
  volume = {46},
  pages = {156--162},
  issn = {0250-8052},
  doi = {10.1111/epp.12283},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1111/epp.12283},
  abstract = {[Excerpt:Introduction]

A 2011 global survey of botanic gardens and arboreta, which included 204 respondents from 146 institutes, revealed that the botanic garden community has the potential to play a significant role in safeguarding plant health. However, responding institutes cited a lack of available training, resources and coordination to support any such work (Kramer \& Hird 2011). Since its launch in November 2013, the International Plant Sentinel Network (IPSN) has been working to provide this support and illustrate the usefulness of such a global network to those working within plant health. The IPSN's ultimate aim is to provide an early warning system for new and emerging pest and pathogen risks.

[] The IPSN is a developing network of botanic gardens, arboreta, National Plant Protection Organizations (NPPOs) and plant health scientists. Funded through EUPHRESCO (EUropean PHytosanitary RESearch COordination) Phytosanitary ERA-Net, the project is now coming to the end of its initial 3 years. During this time, the IPSN has worked to promote engagement, increase awareness and provide the resources to support gardens in carrying out plant health research. The next phase of the IPSN will be to coordinate and facilitate sentinel research projects around the world, working in close collaboration with gardens, NPPOs and scientists. In this way, valuable information will be collected in botanic gardens to aid plant health, for example for pest risk analysis (PRA) and other methods of assessing risk.

[] [...]

[IPSN participation and coordination]

In the UK the EUPHRESCO project has been funded by the UK's Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) and led by FERA, with CABI-UK and Forest Research (UK). Other project partners are the Julius Kühn-Institut (Germany), the Plant Protection Services (Netherlands) and the Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest Systems, University of Tuscia (Italy). The network is, and will continue to be, coordinated by Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI).

[] BGCI is an international consortium of botanic gardens and arboreta dedicated to conserving global plant diversity. The organization, which was established in 1987, sits at the heart of over 3000 gardens worldwide and has much experience coordinating and supporting the work of these institutes. [...]

[] [...]

[Conclusions]

Sentinel research can provide scientists, RPPOs and NPPOs with important information required for making statutory decisions and developing management programmes for damaging plant pests and diseases. Botanic gardens and arboreta provide unique resources in which to carry out this research, and have in the past demonstrated on a small scale the potential role they can play. However, providing support and coordination on a global level can help to realize their true worth to plant health. In the last 3 years the IPSN has developed many of the tools required to engage and support the botanic garden community in this area. The project has raised awareness and understanding around the world, and developed a network of interested and willing individual and institutional participants. The next step of the IPSN will be to facilitate research and provide meaningful and valuable data to NPPOs and RPPOS across the world. To do this, the IPSN needs engagement and support from such government organizations, both financial and in kind. The ultimate goal will be to create a sustainable network, coordinated by BGCI, supported by NPPOs, RPPOs and plant health scientists, but led by the gardens themselves.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-14128453,field-measurements,forest-pests,forest-resources,global-scale,monitoring,plant-pests,risk-assessment,uncertainty,unknown,vegetation},
  number = {1}
}
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