Will one size fit all? Incentives designed to nurture prosocial behaviour. Barile, L.; Cullis, J.; and Jones, P. Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics.
Will one size fit all? Incentives designed to nurture prosocial behaviour [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Gneezy et al. (2011) review a literature that assesses the relevance of the form (monetary or non-monetary) of incentives employed to nurture prosocial behaviour. Here the objective is to assess the relevance of characteristics employed to describe individuals when comparing the efficacy of incentives designed to nurture prosocial behaviour. The impact of different incentives depends on the form they take and on the way they are received. This paper compares the impact of different incentives designed to increase pro-environmental behavior (by increasing individuals’ willingness to recycle household waste). Some individuals are more responsive to a nudge (that increases individuals’ perceptions of the intrinsic value of action) than to a threat (that they will be punished if they refuse to comply). The relative efficacy of these incentives depends on the extent to which individuals are motivated by ‘environmental morale’. When designing policy to increase prosocial behavior, ‘one size will not fit all’.
@article{barile_will_????,
	title = {Will one size fit all? {Incentives} designed to nurture prosocial behaviour},
	issn = {2214-8043},
	shorttitle = {Will one size fit all?},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214804315000464},
	doi = {10.1016/j.socec.2015.04.004},
	abstract = {Gneezy et al. (2011) review a literature that assesses the relevance of the form (monetary or non-monetary) of incentives employed to nurture prosocial behaviour. Here the objective is to assess the relevance of characteristics employed to describe individuals when comparing the efficacy of incentives designed to nurture prosocial behaviour. The impact of different incentives depends on the form they take and on the way they are received. This paper compares the impact of different incentives designed to increase pro-environmental behavior (by increasing individuals’ willingness to recycle household waste). Some individuals are more responsive to a nudge (that increases individuals’ perceptions of the intrinsic value of action) than to a threat (that they will be punished if they refuse to comply). The relative efficacy of these incentives depends on the extent to which individuals are motivated by ‘environmental morale’. When designing policy to increase prosocial behavior, ‘one size will not fit all’.},
	urldate = {2015-05-01},
	journal = {Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics},
	author = {Barile, Lory and Cullis, John and Jones, Philip},
	keywords = {Crowding-in, crowding-out, Environmental morale, nudging, recycling},
	file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:files/51323/Barile et al. - Will one size fit all Incentives designed to nurt.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:files/51324/S2214804315000464.html:text/html}
}
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