COVID-19: community CPAP and NIV should be stopped unless medically necessary to support life. Barker, J.; Oyefeso, O.; Koeckerling, D.; Mudalige, N., L.; and Pan, D. Thorax.
COVID-19: community CPAP and NIV should be stopped unless medically necessary to support life [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   

Dear Editor,

Data from the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 1 (SARS-CoV-1) outbreak suggest high viral load at the time of transmission is associated with worse clinical outcomes.1 Non-invasive ventilation (NIV), including CPAP, is currently listed by the WHO as a high-risk aerosol-generating procedure putting healthcare workers at risk and necessitates the use of personal protective equipment.2 3

The current UK guidance does not account for high-dose viral transmission risk to family and carers in patients using community NIV and CPAP for treatment of chronic respiratory disease, especially obstructive sleep apnoea.

National Health Service guidance states for patients who remain at home during the coronavirus pandemic to continue with their usual method of ventilation.4 The British Thoracic Society guidance for obstructive sleep apnoea advocates patient choice to determine implementation of distancing measures while using CPAP or stopping CPAP for a short...

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 abstract = {<p>Dear Editor,</p> <p>Data from the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 1 (SARS-CoV-1) outbreak suggest high viral load at the time of transmission is associated with worse clinical outcomes.1 Non-invasive ventilation (NIV), including CPAP, is currently listed by the WHO as a high-risk aerosol-generating procedure putting healthcare workers at risk and necessitates the use of personal protective equipment.2 3</p> <p>The current UK guidance does not account for high-dose viral transmission risk to family and carers in patients using community NIV and CPAP for treatment of chronic respiratory disease, especially obstructive sleep apnoea.</p> <p>National Health Service guidance states for patients who remain at home during the coronavirus pandemic to continue with their usual method of ventilation.4 The British Thoracic Society guidance for obstructive sleep apnoea advocates patient choice to determine implementation of distancing measures while using CPAP or stopping CPAP for a short...</p>},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Barker, Joseph and Oyefeso, Oluwatobiloba and Koeckerling, David and Mudalige, Nadeesha Lakmal and Pan, Daniel},
 journal = {Thorax}
}
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