Applications of coarse-grained dataflow in computational mechanics. Baugh Jr., J. & Rehak, D. Engineering with Computers, 8(1):13-30, 1992.
abstract   bibtex   
Dataflow models are free of side effects and have no notion of state or sequencing. Because these representations place a partial, as opposed to a total, ordering on the execution of their component operations, the concurrent aspects of computation are clearly revealed. The correspondence between dataflow graphs and purely functional programs allows computations to be expressed in a high-level functional language and subsequently transformed into a dataflow graph. This paper describes the use of dataflow models as an alternative control strategy for engineering analysis programs and contrasts them with traditional imperative approaches. The characteristics of functional languages are also described, as is their inherent parallelism, which may be realized by compilation into dataflow graphs. The application of functional languages to finite element programming is presented, which allows the alternating assembly and solution of system equations found in frontal solvers. Issues such as the incremental update of arrays and the simulation of state are also addressed. © 1992 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.
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 title = {Applications of coarse-grained dataflow in computational mechanics},
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 abstract = {Dataflow models are free of side effects and have no notion of state or sequencing. Because these representations place a partial, as opposed to a total, ordering on the execution of their component operations, the concurrent aspects of computation are clearly revealed. The correspondence between dataflow graphs and purely functional programs allows computations to be expressed in a high-level functional language and subsequently transformed into a dataflow graph. This paper describes the use of dataflow models as an alternative control strategy for engineering analysis programs and contrasts them with traditional imperative approaches. The characteristics of functional languages are also described, as is their inherent parallelism, which may be realized by compilation into dataflow graphs. The application of functional languages to finite element programming is presented, which allows the alternating assembly and solution of system equations found in frontal solvers. Issues such as the incremental update of arrays and the simulation of state are also addressed. © 1992 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Baugh Jr., J.W. and Rehak, D.R.},
 journal = {Engineering with Computers},
 number = {1}
}
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