Estimating Midflame Windspeeds. Baughman, R. G. and Albini, F. A. In Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Fire and Forest Meteorology, pages 88–92. Society of Americal Foresters.
Estimating Midflame Windspeeds [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Wind is one of the major factors involved in predicting forest fire behavior. Fire behavior models require wind information to predict fire spread in various fuel types and within forest stands in complex terrain. The oeans of providing the necessary wind data in remote areas, however, are presently not available in usable forms. Studies are now underway at the Northern Forest Fire Laboratory to develop ways of estimating or predicting wind velocities on a local scale of a fire given various topographic and vegetative conditions. Rothermel (1972) gives a mathematical model for predicting the rate of spread of a surface fire. This model uses an average windspeec at "midflame height" to account for the influence of wind on the rate of spread. But the windspeed is usually measured or forecast at a standard height of 20 feet (6 m) above the vegetation (Fischer and Hardy 1972), making it necessary to approximate the "midflame windspeed given the 20-foot standard height wind. Recently, Albini and Baughman (1979) published a mathematical treatment of the problem. But the analytical developnent was not in a form convenient for application, so a more practical tabular form was subsequently produced. The two forms, analytical and tabular, are discussed here to provide continuity and proper documentation. The basic concepts and results are presented along with the more convenient tabular data presently used by fire behavior officers. We first describe the wind field over a vegetative cover that is a single-stratum fuel (grass, brush, and so forth). The second part of the paper deals with wind under a forest canopy.
@inproceedings{baughmanEstimatingMidflameWindspeeds1980,
  title = {Estimating Midflame Windspeeds},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the {{Sixth Conference}} on {{Fire}} and {{Forest Meteorology}}},
  author = {Baughman, Robert G. and Albini, Frank A.},
  date = {1980},
  pages = {88--92},
  publisher = {{Society of Americal Foresters}},
  url = {https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cluster=3550631316312946269},
  abstract = {Wind is one of the major factors involved in predicting forest fire behavior. Fire behavior models require wind information to predict fire spread in various fuel types and within forest stands in complex terrain. The oeans of providing the necessary wind data in remote areas, however, are presently not available in usable forms. Studies are now underway at the Northern Forest Fire Laboratory to develop ways of estimating or predicting wind velocities on a local scale of a fire given various topographic and vegetative conditions. Rothermel (1972) gives a mathematical model for predicting the rate of spread of a surface fire. This model uses an average windspeec at "midflame height" to account for the influence of wind on the rate of spread. But the windspeed is usually measured or forecast at a standard height of 20 feet (6 m) above the vegetation (Fischer and Hardy 1972), making it necessary to approximate the "midflame windspeed given the 20-foot standard height wind. Recently, Albini and Baughman (1979) published a mathematical treatment of the problem. But the analytical developnent was not in a form convenient for application, so a more practical tabular form was subsequently produced. The two forms, analytical and tabular, are discussed here to provide continuity and proper documentation. The basic concepts and results are presented along with the more convenient tabular data presently used by fire behavior officers. We first describe the wind field over a vegetative cover that is a single-stratum fuel (grass, brush, and so forth). The second part of the paper deals with wind under a forest canopy.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-11900175,computational-science,environmental-modelling,forest-fires,forest-resources,modelling,wildfires,wind},
  venue = {Seattle, WA, United States}
}
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