The breast-cancer-ization of cancer survivorship: Implications for experiences of the disease. Bell, K. Social Science & Medicine.
The breast-cancer-ization of cancer survivorship: Implications for experiences of the disease [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Numerous observers have commented on the cultural prominence of breast cancer in North America. However, although popular and biomedical conceptions of cancer survivorship have been influenced to an inordinate degree by breast cancer, few researchers have examined the impact of dominant discourses on people diagnosed with other forms of cancer. Drawing on interviews with 32 Canadian men and women with a history of cancer conducted between 2010-2013, I demonstrate that breast cancer became central to their own experiences of cancer, providing an important lens through which to understand the effects of the disease. The effects of these comparisons were diverse, leading some participants to want to differentiate themselves from this implicit norm, leading others to downplay the seriousness of their own forms of suffering, and amplifying a sense of shame and stigma in yet others.
@article{bell_breast-cancer-ization_????,
	title = {The breast-cancer-ization of cancer survivorship: {Implications} for experiences of the disease},
	issn = {0277-9536},
	shorttitle = {The breast-cancer-ization of cancer survivorship},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953614002007},
	doi = {10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.03.031},
	abstract = {Numerous observers have commented on the cultural prominence of breast cancer in North America. However, although popular and biomedical conceptions of cancer survivorship have been influenced to an inordinate degree by breast cancer, few researchers have examined the impact of dominant discourses on people diagnosed with other forms of cancer. Drawing on interviews with 32 Canadian men and women with a history of cancer conducted between 2010-2013, I demonstrate that breast cancer became central to their own experiences of cancer, providing an important lens through which to understand the effects of the disease. The effects of these comparisons were diverse, leading some participants to want to differentiate themselves from this implicit norm, leading others to downplay the seriousness of their own forms of suffering, and amplifying a sense of shame and stigma in yet others.},
	urldate = {2014-03-31},
	journal = {Social Science \& Medicine},
	author = {Bell, Kirsten},
	keywords = {biosociality, Canada, cancer, cancer survivorship, discourse analysis, Interviews, North America},
	file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:files/48783/Bell - The breast-cancer-ization of cancer survivorship .pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:files/48773/S0277953614002007.html:text/html}
}
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