A Space-based Decametric Wavelength Radio Telescope Concept. Belov, K.; Branch, A.; Broschart, S.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Chien, S.; Clare, L.; Dengler, R.; Gao, J.; Garza, D.; Hegedus, A.; Hernandez, S.; Herzig, S.; Imken, T.; Kim, H.; Mandutianu, S.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Schaffer, S.; Troesch, M.; Wyatt, E. J.; and Lazio, J. Experimental Astronomy, Springer, August, 2018.
A Space-based Decametric Wavelength Radio Telescope Concept [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   9 downloads  
This paper reports a design study for a space-based decametric wavelength telescope. While not a new concept, this design study focused on many of the operational aspects that would be required for an actual mission. This design optimized the number of spacecraft to insure good visibility of approx. 80 percent of the radio galaxies – the primary science target for the mission. A 5,000 km lunar orbit was selected to guarantee minimal gravitational perturbations from Earth and lower radio interference. Optimal schemes for data downlink, spacecraft ranging, and power consumption were identified. An optimal mission duration of 1 year was chosen based on science goals, payload complexity, and other factors. Finally, preliminary simulations showing image reconstruction were conducted to confirm viability of the mission. This work is intended to show the viability and science benefits of conducting multi-spacecraft networked radio astronomy missions in the next few years.
@article{ belov_ea2018_decametric,
  author = {K. Belov and A. Branch and S. Broschart and J. Castillo-Rogez and S. Chien and L. Clare and R. Dengler and J. Gao and D. Garza and A. Hegedus and S. Hernandez and S. Herzig and T. Imken and H. Kim and S. Mandutianu and A. Romero-Wolf and S. Schaffer and M. Troesch and E. J. Wyatt and J. Lazio},
  title = {A Space-based Decametric Wavelength Radio Telescope Concept},
  journal = {Experimental Astronomy},
  year = {2018},
  month = {August},
  publisher = {Springer},
  abstract = {This paper reports a design study for a space-based decametric wavelength telescope. While not a new concept, this design study focused on many of the operational aspects that would be required for an actual mission. This design optimized the number of spacecraft to insure good visibility of approx. 80 percent of the radio galaxies -- the primary science target for the mission. A 5,000 km lunar orbit was selected to guarantee minimal gravitational perturbations from Earth and lower radio interference. Optimal schemes for data downlink, spacecraft ranging, and power consumption were identified. An optimal mission duration of 1 year was chosen based on science goals, payload complexity, and other factors. Finally, preliminary simulations showing image reconstruction were conducted to confirm viability of the mission. This work is intended to show the viability and science benefits of conducting multi-spacecraft networked radio astronomy missions in the next few years.},
  doi = {10.1007/s10686-018-9601-6},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s10686-018-9601-6},
  clearance = {CL#18-4423},
  project = {relic},
}
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