Interpreting Anzac and Gallipoli through a Century of Anglophone Screen Representations. Bennett, J. In Collins, F., Landman, J., & Bye, S., editors, A Companion to Australian Cinema, pages 205–227. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 2019.
Interpreting Anzac and Gallipoli through a Century of Anglophone Screen Representations [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
War has featured as a recurring theme in Australian cinema and germane to this concern has been the special significance attached by Australians to Gallipoli. This chapter discusses selected examples, situates them in their historical and production contexts, and discusses their shifting nature over the course of a century. One of its major concerns is to assess the extent to which more recent exemplars that embed what has been called the 'global turn' broaden perspective and deepen audience understandings of the Great War. While the emphasis is on Australian texts, the discussion integrates key examples of other English language productions where they advance the argument. Englishness is, for example, a key element in early representations of the Anzac legend, and later functioned as a counterpoint for the new nationalism. British screen representations of Anzac and Gallipoli, albeit few in number, also shed some valuable light on Australian screen constructions.
@incollection{bennett_interpreting_2019,
	title = {Interpreting {Anzac} and {Gallipoli} through a {Century} of {Anglophone} {Screen} {Representations}},
	copyright = {© 2019 John Wiley \& Sons, Inc.},
	isbn = {978-1-118-94256-7},
	url = {https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/9781118942567.ch10},
	abstract = {War has featured as a recurring theme in Australian cinema and germane to this concern has been the special significance attached by Australians to Gallipoli. This chapter discusses selected examples, situates them in their historical and production contexts, and discusses their shifting nature over the course of a century. One of its major concerns is to assess the extent to which more recent exemplars that embed what has been called the 'global turn' broaden perspective and deepen audience understandings of the Great War. While the emphasis is on Australian texts, the discussion integrates key examples of other English language productions where they advance the argument. Englishness is, for example, a key element in early representations of the Anzac legend, and later functioned as a counterpoint for the new nationalism. British screen representations of Anzac and Gallipoli, albeit few in number, also shed some valuable light on Australian screen constructions.},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2019-04-23},
	booktitle = {A {Companion} to {Australian} {Cinema}},
	publisher = {John Wiley \& Sons, Ltd},
	author = {Bennett, James},
	editor = {Collins, Felicity and Landman, Jane and Bye, Susan},
	year = {2019},
	doi = {10.1002/9781118942567.ch10},
	keywords = {🇬🇧🇺🇸English},
	pages = {205--227}
}

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